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    Hi guys. How many of you have looked into Labour Market Information regarding your future career prospects?
    In other words... do people research how many jobs are actually available in their preferred sector, and do you/have you looked into the geographical locations of jobs?
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    (Original post by Loltait)
    Hi guys. How many of you have looked into Labour Market Information regarding your future career prospects?
    In other words... do people research how many jobs are actually available in their preferred sector, and do you/have you looked into the geographical locations of jobs?
    A lot of people are struggling to understand what subject never mind what career.

    I think students are vaguely aware of a job they might be interested in and do degrees accordingly, lawyer, Dr, scientist etc, but I dont see people looking too much ay jobs unless they are super keen on money and potential investment bankers.

    I do see they are sometimes aware of how the job market is generally i.e limited opportunities in pharmacy, certain job in medicine and highly competitive for law., Ive never seen people mention as detailed as geographical locations.
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    Thanks for your reply. Interesting to find out perspectives.
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    Currently I'm just trying not to drop out of uni and the furthest I've got in finding a potential career is finding something that doesn't want to make me claw my eyes out! Geographical location isn't much of an issue because once I've graduated I'll need a new place to live anyway so I'll just go where a job or postgrad degree takes me. Unless it's London. I'm never moving anywhere near London for any job
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    (Original post by PollyParrot23)
    Currently I'm just trying not to drop out of uni and the furthest I've got in finding a potential career is finding something that doesn't want to make me claw my eyes out! Geographical location isn't much of an issue because once I've graduated I'll need a new place to live anyway so I'll just go where a job or postgrad degree takes me. Unless it's London. I'm never moving anywhere near London for any job
    Thanks for your reply
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    A lot of people are struggling to understand what subject never mind what career.

    I think students are vaguely aware of a job they might be interested in and do degrees accordingly, lawyer, Dr, scientist etc, but I dont see people looking too much ay jobs unless they are super keen on money and potential investment bankers.

    I do see they are sometimes aware of how the job market is generally i.e limited opportunities in pharmacy, certain job in medicine and highly competitive for law., Ive never seen people mention as detailed as geographical locations.
    I think this is part of the issue, people are told study what you love at uni and worry about work later by a lot of colleges and six forms. While in an ideal world that would be great, in reality (from what I see at my own uni) a large proportion of people who followed this advice (that did non-vocational rather than vocational degrees) are now facing either having to do masters to retrain, take years out to learn new skills or are applying for grad jobs they dont really want to do as, now they know what they want to do career wise, they can't gain access to it due to the degree they took.

    I think of all my friends that do non-vocational degrees about 80% had no idea what career they were going to do (or still dont and are in 3rd year now)

    Perhaps people should be told to TRY select a career they think they want to do as a degree is only 3-4 years compared to the length of work like being just under 50 years and the fact that most jobs dont actually use most/all of the info covered in a degree (other than medicine, nursing, dentistry etc)
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    (Original post by Loltait)
    Hi guys. How many of you have looked into Labour Market Information regarding your future career prospects?
    In other words... do people research how many jobs are actually available in their preferred sector, and do you/have you looked into the geographical locations of jobs?
    Not many I dont think, people who pick more vocational degrees know what they want to do as a career but most others who do a non vocational subject (history, physics, maths etc) don't have a clue what they are going to do after uni and just follow the naive 'study what you love' advice.
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    Not many I dont think, people who pick more vocational degrees know what they want to do as a career but most others who do a non vocational subject (history, physics, maths etc) don't have a clue what they are going to do after uni and just follow the naive 'study what you love' advice.
    I think studying what you love is sound advice, however you’ve gotta make sure there’s career options that fit that too. I like the phrase ‘find what you’re good at, and find what you love - your career needs to be an overlap of the two.’
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    Not many I dont think, people who pick more vocational degrees know what they want to do as a career but most others who do a non vocational subject (history, physics, maths etc) don't have a clue what they are going to do after uni and just follow the naive 'study what you love' advice.
    I did the opposite and took the 'study what has job prospects path' and you know what? All the 'sensible' advice does is send you down a path you don't like. I don't think it's naive to say study what you love. It's naive to not consider job prospects and alternative careers, thinking you can go and do a drama degree and suddenly become a Hollywood star is naive. But from my own experience, I would tell people to do what they love.
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    (Original post by PollyParrot23)
    I did the opposite and took the 'study what has job prospects path' and you know what? All the 'sensible' advice does is send you down a path you don't like. I don't think it's naive to say study what you love. It's naive to not consider job prospects and alternative careers, thinking you can go and do a drama degree and suddenly become a Hollywood star is naive. But from my own experience, I would tell people to do what they love.
    Obviously pick a career you think you will enjoy, I didnt just mean pick a career with excellent job prospects and money.

    People don't tend to give the advice 'study what you love and look at the career prospects' most of the time they just say if you dont know what you want to do then study what you love and worry about the job prospects later, rather than actually thinking about what you would like to do as a career.

    My advice is find a career you think you will enjoy working in and make a path to get to it, not what you said above, I think the advice you followed was equally was stupid as the study what you love advice.

    As I said before I think the study what you love advice is crap for non vocational subjects because 99% of people dont end up working in that field.
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    (Original post by Loltait)
    I think studying what you love is sound advice, however you’ve gotta make sure there’s career options that fit that too. I like the phrase ‘find what you’re good at, and find what you love - your career needs to be an overlap of the two.’
    I think I would change the wording a bit to 'find what you love, get good at it and seek the career that uses that' (though obviously within reason, something like astronaut would be unrealistic). As I believe that anyone can get to a good enough skill level in that skill/subject to work in it if they put the work in. The find what you are good at part implies you already should some natural ability in that thing before even starting (maths and art are both good examples of this, people tend to say you need to have some natural ability in them to get anywhere with them, which isn't true in my experience) From what I saw when I was younger this is what discouraged children and early teens from pursing certain things, because people enforced the 'you need to have a natural ability in what you want to do' stereotype

    Though an element of luck comes into play to when securing a career
 
 
 
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