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What's an independent/dependant variable? Watch

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    In my textbook, it says "the variable that the researcher chooses to change or manipulate" then gives an example that if a psychologist wanted to research memory in school kids then the independent variable would be the age. I'm struggling to understand why they would change the age. That doesn't make sense to me. Can someone please dumb down this definition for me? Please.
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    Independent is the one you change. Dependent is the one that changes based on the one you control.

    So if they change age (by choosing 10 year olds) is their memory better than the 12 year olds, or 14 year olds they choose. The age is controlled, so is independent of other factors, memory ability is thought to be dependent on age.
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    Ur dependant variable is a variable that is dependent on the independent variable. A change in the independent variable will result in the change of the dependent variable.

    Dependent variable is the variable that u will measure. Independent Variable is the variable u change.
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    Just remember:

    Dependant is what you measure

    Independent is what you change.
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    Independent variable is one that you change yourself with your experiment, survey etc. A dependent variable is one that changes as a result of the independent one being changed and will be what you are measuring.

    In the example you have given the experiment is looking at how memory differs in school children at different ages (I'm guessing). Age would be the independent variable and whatever signifies memory is the dependent variable as they are investigating how it changes with each age group.

    A physics example is looking at how resistance in a certain component changes as voltage does in a circuit. Voltage would be the independent variable which you manually change with each reading and resistance would be the dependent variable which you are measuring.



    (Original post by Emerald777O)
    Can you please give me another example of an independent variable that can be changed or manipulated?. I still don't understand. If the r wants to investigate memory then the researcher would get school kids from all ages and thats what the independent variable means? but how is that changing anything?
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    (Original post by Tubbz)
    Independent is the one you change. Dependent is the one that changes based on the one you control.

    So if they change age (by choosing 10 year olds) is their memory better than the 12 year olds, or 14 year olds they choose. The age is controlled, so is independent of other factors, memory ability is thought to be dependent on age.
    (Original post by Shaanv)
    Ur dependant variable is a variable that is dependent on the independent variable. A change in the independent variable will result in the change of the dependent variable.

    Dependent variable is the variable that u will measure. Independent Variable is the variable u change.
    (Original post by Texxers)
    Just remember:

    Dependant is what you measure

    Independent is what you change.
    Can you please give me another example of an independent variable that can be changed or manipulated?. I still don't understand. If the r wants to investigate memory then the researcher would get school kids from all ages and thats what the independent variable means? but how is that changing anything?
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    Basically independent variable is the one you change and the dependant variable is the one you measure, control variables are things you need to control to keep it a fair test, extraneous variables are variables that you cant control
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    (Original post by Emerald777O)
    Can you please give me another example of an independent variable that can be changed or manipulated?. I still don't understand. If the r wants to investigate memory then the researcher would get school kids from all ages and thats what the independent variable means? but how is that changing anything?
    It could be the age of the kids? The independent variable (What you change) could be the childrens age...
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    Independent variable is one that you change yourself with your experiment, survey etc. A dependent variable is one that changes as a result of the independent one being changed and will be what you are measuring.

    In the example you have given the experiment is looking at how memory differs in school children at different ages (I'm guessing). Age would be the independent variable and whatever signifies memory is the dependent variable as they are investigating how it changes with each age group.

    A physics example is looking at how resistance in a certain component changes as voltage does in a circuit. Voltage would be the independent variable which you manually change with each reading and resistance would be the dependent variable which you are measuring.
    omg it still dont understand
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    (Original post by Emerald777O)
    Can you please give me another example of an independent variable that can be changed or manipulated?. I still don't understand. If the r wants to investigate memory then the researcher would get school kids from all ages and thats what the independent variable means? but how is that changing anything?
    Gender.

    If they change gender, does memory ability change.

    Is memory ability dependent on gender.

    The question is..

    "Is memory dependent on..."

    Memory is always dependent on something. What those somethings are, are independent, or controlled variables.
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    (Original post by Emerald777O)
    omg it still dont understand
    Which part.
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    (Original post by Tubbz)
    Gender.

    If they change gender, does memory ability change.

    Is memory ability dependent on gender.

    The question is..

    "Is memory dependent on..."

    Memory is always dependent on something. What those somethings are, are independent, or controlled variables.
    ohh so if they change the gender then does it affect ability? ah ok so if for example, in an experiment looking at the effects of studying on test scores, studying would be the IV because why?
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    Which part.
    everything

    (Original post by Texxers)
    It could be the age of the kids? The independent variable (What you change) could be the childrens age...
    Uh ok
    (Original post by rainerrg)
    Basically independent variable is the one you change and the dependant variable is the one you measure, control variables are things you need to control to keep it a fair test, extraneous variables are variables that you cant control
    I know that haha everyone said it already but i dont understand it in my example.
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    (Original post by Emerald777O)
    everything


    Uh ok


    I know that haha everyone said it already but i dont understand it in my example.
    You still seem rather confused haha..
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    (Original post by Emerald777O)
    ohh so if they change the gender then does it affect ability? ah ok so if for example, in an experiment looking at the effects of studying on test scores, studying would be the IV because why?
    Because study hours is controlled. When you see independent, read it as controlled. The test score doesn't affect the study hours, the study hours affects the test score.
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    (Original post by Tubbz)
    Because study hours is controlled. When you see independent, read it as controlled. The test score doesn't affect the study hours, the study hours affects the test score.
    (Original post by Texxers)
    You still seem rather confused haha..
    /
    Ok, i understand. Are independent and dependant variables only in Laboratory experiments because they have controls?
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    (Original post by Emerald777O)
    everything


    Uh ok


    I know that haha everyone said it already but i dont understand it in my example.
    So with an experiment or survey you are looking at the relationship/correlation between different variables. What you will do to observe this relationship/correlation is manually change one of the variables which will be the independent variable then you will measure another variable which changes as you change the independent variable. There's a 3rd variable called the control which you basically keep the same as you are looking at the relationship between two other variables but this one may affect them so you need to state it.

    I'll change the example I gave again. A known physics equation is voltage = current x resistance. A experiment to confirm this equation would be to look at the relationship between two of the variables. In an experiment you would look at the voltage going through a component with a changing resistance. The independent variable would be the resistance which you manually change and you would record the voltage and how it changes as the resistance does. The current is the control variable since it is part of the equation and you need it to be there to confirm its validity but you can simply keep it the same.

    With your example they are looking at how memory differs with children of different ages. They are performing an experiment to see if there is a relationship between memory and age in children. They are changing the age because that's what they are able to and then measure the memory (however they do that) of children in each bracket and look for a relationship.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    So with an experiment or survey you are looking at the relationship/correlation between different variables. What you will do to observe this relationship/correlation is manually change one of the variables which will be the independent variable then you will measure another variable which changes as you change the independent variable. There's a 3rd variable called the control which you basically keep the same as you are looking at the relationship between two other variables but this one may affect them so you need to state it.

    I'll change the example I gave again. A known physics equation is voltage = current x resistance. A experiment to confirm this equation would be to look at the relationship between two of the variables. In an experiment you would look at the voltage going through a component with a changing resistance. The independent variable would be the resistance which you manually change and you would record the voltage and how it changes as the resistance does. The current is the control variable since it is part of the equation and you need it to be there to confirm its validity but you can simply keep it the same.

    With your example they are looking at how memory differs with children of different ages. They are performing an experiment to see if there is a relationship between memory and age in children. They are changing the age because that's what they are able to and then measure the memory (however they do that) of children in each bracket and look for a relationship.
    I understand much better now, thanks so much!
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    (Original post by Emerald777O)
    I understand much better now, thanks so much!
    No problem
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    (Original post by Emerald777O)
    /
    Ok, i understand. Are independent and dependant variables only in Laboratory experiments because they have controls?
    No same with maths.

    If you change x (the independent variable), what happens to y(the variable dependent on the changing variable, x)?
 
 
 
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