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    It's one of the pieces of work I'm struggling with this half-term and I thought some ideas from the community might inspire me
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    tbh this is a book that does not need to be written :rolleyes:

    i suppose you could mention pets which have died idk
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    (Original post by desktopcooking)
    It's one of the pieces of work I'm struggling with this half-term and I thought some ideas from the community might inspire me
    The original fairy tale 'The Little Mermaid' was a story that was meant to make death less scary for children. It is written by Hans Christian Anderson. You can read the whole version here.


    http://hca.gilead.org.il/li_merma.html
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    (Original post by desktopcooking)
    It's one of the pieces of work I'm struggling with this half-term and I thought some ideas from the community might inspire me
    It might help to look at some existing resources like other books or advice on how to explain death to a child.

    Most children's books work by following a character going on a journey or making a realisation so you could write about a child experiencing the death of a loved one. Do you know what sort of age you are looking at? Picture book level or a bit older?

    I would avoid references to the afterlife unless you are wanting to target it to a religion. You could mention that nobody is sure or something, but avoid saying they go to heaven etc unless that is your aim.
    You could have a line like "Mummy says nobody knows where people go when they die, but I think it's somewhere nice." Covers the topic just enough to give comfort, but doesn't give enough detail to offend most beliefs.

    Assuming you're going for picture book level, I would tend to go for a kid (human or animal) watching a loved one get ill, die and the aftermath. Have pictures and a cometary from the kid with a "happy" or accepting ending.
    Try to follow the journey a child might go through when their own loved one dies.

    Do you mind me asking what this is for and if you have ever experienced death before?
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    It might help to look at some existing resources like other books or advice on how to explain death to a child.

    Most children's books work by following a character going on a journey or making a realisation so you could write about a child experiencing the death of a loved one. Do you know what sort of age you are looking at? Picture book level or a bit older?

    I would avoid references to the afterlife unless you are wanting to target it to a religion. You could mention that nobody is sure or something, but avoid saying they go to heaven etc unless that is your aim.
    You could have a line like "Mummy says nobody knows where people go when they die, but I think it's somewhere nice." Covers the topic just enough to give comfort, but doesn't give enough detail to offend most beliefs.

    Assuming you're going for picture book level, I would tend to go for a kid (human or animal) watching a loved one get ill, die and the aftermath. Have pictures and a cometary from the kid with a "happy" or accepting ending.
    Try to follow the journey a child might go through when their own loved one dies.

    Do you mind me asking what this is for and if you have ever experienced death before?
    This is for a mandatory homework project and not really, I've never had any pets and wasn't close to any deceased extended family members.
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    (Original post by desktopcooking)
    This is for a mandatory homework project and not really, I've never had any pets and wasn't close to any deceased extended family members.
    Wow. That's pretty deep for homework. Not sure how I feel about that. Frankly you're probably rather young to be confronting death yourself, let alone making a book about it.

    You're naturally going to find this hard because you don't really know what you're writing about. Death is a pretty unique thing and if you haven't experienced it you aren't going to be able to fully understand it.

    What I would do it read up a little on child grief and how to explain death to kids then use that to make short sentences from the child's perspective. Mush those together into a chain of events an done.
    Kid's books aren't that complex so you don't have to worry too much about story or anything.

    You might be able to find some examples of this sort of book in a public library, bookshop or as online previews. you can take a look at some of them and kid's books in general to give you a better idea of how they work.

    It might also help to check out advice on sites like childline. It will have an older target audience, but could be a decent intro for you if nothing else.

    Anything more specific you want advice/ opinions on just ask.
 
 
 
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