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Struggling to write up my analysis for Computer Science coursework? Watch

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    Hi there,

    For my CS A-Level coursework this year, I'm programming a "Solar System Sandbox" to showcase orbits for planets and use equations for circular motion and gravitational fields. I'm struggling to think of a good application for my analysis...

    I have to begin with explaining and identifying problems with the "current system" and identify the background. Problem is, for a solar system sandbox, I cannot think of a current system or anything to compare with!

    Any help is appreciated. Thanks!
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    (Original post by YeoniSmol)
    Hi there,

    For my CS A-Level coursework this year, I'm programming a "Solar System Sandbox" to showcase orbits for planets and use equations for circular motion and gravitational fields. I'm struggling to think of a good application for my analysis...

    I have to begin with explaining and identifying problems with the "current system" and identify the background. Problem is, for a solar system sandbox, I cannot think of a current system or anything to compare with!

    Any help is appreciated. Thanks!
    Hey mate, I'm currently taking my GCSE AQA CS Controlled Assessment, and I have to do something similar. The program we are writing is very simple, an application that generates and checks password inputted by the user, but we have to do an analysis stage and testing stage, outlining the problems we have come across during our assessment.

    With your scenario, I would just comment on the mathematics behind it and how the maths has developed. Since there is no control system to compare your model with, I wouldn't say that you would need a comparison. If you do really need one though, I would suggest comparing earlier versions of your model to the final and most recently compiled one. Talk about how your model has changed and what problems you encountered at the start, how you fixed them, if they made any new problems and if the bugs in general are gone all together.

    With identifying, talk about and explain deeply (I mean really deeply - line by line) on what the iconic features of your program does. It's really just an extended and more developed version of a task decomposition.

    Hope I helped!
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    (Original post by RickiestRick)
    Hey mate, I'm currently taking my GCSE AQA CS Controlled Assessment, and I have to do something similar. The program we are writing is very simple, an application that generates and checks password inputted by the user, but we have to do an analysis stage and testing stage, outlining the problems we have come across during our assessment.

    With your scenario, I would just comment on the mathematics behind it and how the maths has developed. Since there is no control system to compare your model with, I wouldn't say that you would need a comparison. If you do really need one though, I would suggest comparing earlier versions of your model to the final and most recently compiled one. Talk about how your model has changed and what problems you encountered at the start, how you fixed them, if they made any new problems and if the bugs in general are gone all together.

    With identifying, talk about and explain deeply (I mean really deeply - line by line) on what the iconic features of your program does. It's really just an extended and more developed version of a task decomposition.

    Hope I helped!
    That really has helped, thank you!

    One problem I am finding is that the mark scheme requires the student to tackle a "real world problem" and create a solution - I'm really struggling to find a real world application or problem that would benefit from a solar system simulator. It also states that I would have to consider the need to the consumer.

    Completely lost at the beginning!
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    (Original post by YeoniSmol)
    That really has helped, thank you!

    One problem I am finding is that the mark scheme requires the student to tackle a "real world problem" and create a solution - I'm really struggling to find a real world application or problem that would benefit from a solar system simulator. It also states that I would have to consider the need to the consumer.

    Completely lost at the beginning!
    Sorry for the late reply mate, but some here are some applications for a simulation for the solar system that I can think of:


    - Universities (where they predict the course of our current solar system using a simulation as a reference, changing the environment and all the configurations to match the environment that they're trying to emulate).

    - Games (some games may want a realistic physics plot I guess?)

    Anyway, there you go.
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    Just a reminder to be careful when discussing your NEA task for GCSE Computer Science. Discussion of live, confidential, examination material on social media, such as the specifics of the task or any potential solutions, is against regulations and can affect your results.
    Here is some helpful information to help you stay on the right track when discussing your GCSEs on social media. If you have any questions you can speak to your teacher.
 
 
 
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