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    Hi all,

    I recently received an offer from a bank for an M&A role, and was wondering what a caution for common assault might do to the chances of the offer being withdrawn?

    It was a stupid mistake where I was in an abusive relationship and lashed out at my partner 2 years ago. I called the FCA and they said it would be fine as it has nothing to do with dishonesty/fraud. Was wondering what you guys think?

    Would it be good to let HR know before background check results come back?
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    (Original post by HelpSeeker592)
    Hi all,

    I recently received an offer from a bank for an M&A role, and was wondering what a caution for common assault might do to the chances of the offer being withdrawn?

    It was a stupid mistake where I was in an abusive relationship and lashed out at my partner 2 years ago. I called the FCA and they said it would be fine as it has nothing to do with dishonesty/fraud. Was wondering what you guys think?

    Would it be good to let HR know before background check results come back?
    How old were you went given the caution?
    Are you female? Sorry thats a bit sexist.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    How old were you went given the caution?
    Are you female? Sorry thats a bit sexist.
    I am male, I just turned 21 then. It happened 2 years ago. I know that in a basic DBS check the caution will not come up but I dont know if my bank does basic/standard DBS checks.
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    (Original post by HelpSeeker592)
    I am male, I just turned 21 then. It happened 2 years ago. I know that in a basic DBS check the caution will not come up but I dont know if my bank does basic/standard DBS checks.
    Most banks are allowed to withdraw offers on the basis of cautions as they are permitted to do enhanced/standard checks.

    That being said they'll probably not be too fussed as it wasnt dishonest, it will make working on projects abroad a nightmare though (namely US, Canada and Aus)
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    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    Most banks are allowed to withdraw offers on the basis of cautions as they are permitted to do enhanced/standard checks.

    That being said they'll probably not be too fussed as it wasnt dishonest, it will make working on projects abroad a nightmare though (namely US, Canada and Aus)
    Thanks for the input. Would you recommend I disclose it to HR before the background check or on the background check form? And if it asks "Have you ever been convicted", should I say yes or no? As it is only a caution

    I have also talked to the FCA and they said this is not a problem as it is not related to integrity or dishonesty. So does that put me in a better position with the firm continuing with the offer?
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    Depends if the Police Officer performing it, thinks its relevant to declare.

    I think its unlikely for roles you are not working with children in

    Once you do start the job, try to create a significant saving nest to use, in case you get terminated at any moment
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    (Original post by hannah00)
    Depends if the Police Officer performing it, thinks its relevant to declare.

    I think its unlikely for roles you are not working with children in

    Once you do start the job, try to create a significant saving nest to use, in case you get terminated at any moment
    I think it would be a professional background check company performing the DBS check, and then giving the results to HR. The police will not be involved.
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    (Original post by HelpSeeker592)
    Thanks for the input. Would you recommend I disclose it to HR before the background check or on the background check form? And if it asks "Have you ever been convicted", should I say yes or no? As it is only a caution

    I have also talked to the FCA and they said this is not a problem as it is not related to integrity or dishonesty. So does that put me in a better position with the firm continuing with the offer?
    Banks are exempt so you’re obliged to disclose (best to do it on your terms than have them see it through a DBS imo as it shows honesty) this will also help them prepare for any visa issues in the future.
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    (Original post by HelpSeeker592)
    I think it would be a professional background check company performing the DBS check, and then giving the results to HR. The police will not be involved.
    they still use the police , such companies are just middlemen.

    https://www.disclosureservices.com/p...reau-crb-check
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    (Original post by HelpSeeker592)
    ..................
    Disclose it the first time you are asked, not before, and don't wait for the second time! There's no harm in ticking yes you have a conviction, so long as you can then say more about exactly what, because it is 'only' a caution. Saying yes won't be an automatic exclusion, it will just lead them to reading the rest of the form.

    Ignore all ideas of needing a nest egg or getting terminated suddenly - they'll either proceed with the offer and that's the end of it, or they will terminate the offer. It is unlikely to be an issue for a bank (unless the visa issue is likely to crop up).
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    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    Banks are exempt so you’re obliged to disclose (best to do it on your terms than have them see it through a DBS imo as it shows honesty) this will also help them prepare for any visa issues in the future.
    I see. So are you recommending that I should state it clearly in the background check form or should I take action and call them first? How do you think banks treat these types of situations, especially since it is a caution and not a conviction? I have heard of HR not caring at all to them calling applicants and demanding an answer.
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    Disclose it the first time you are asked, not before, and don't wait for the second time! There's no harm in ticking yes you have a conviction, so long as you can then say more about exactly what, because it is 'only' a caution. Saying yes won't be an automatic exclusion, it will just lead them to reading the rest of the form.

    Ignore all ideas of needing a nest egg or getting terminated suddenly - they'll either proceed with the offer and that's the end of it, or they will terminate the offer. It is unlikely to be an issue for a bank (unless the visa issue is likely to crop up).
    Thank you so much for your help. I don't think the Visa will be a problem as it is based in the UK and I am British. In your opinion, how likely are they to terminate an offer for a caution for common assault? I have also asked my professors to write me character references in case.
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    (Original post by HelpSeeker592)
    Thank you so much for your help. I don't think the Visa will be a problem as it is based in the UK and I am British. In your opinion, how likely are they to terminate an offer for a caution for common assault? I have also asked my professors to write me character references in case.
    Individual organisations will make their own risk assessments, but by and large, they've made an investment in the recruitment process and they've selected you from among hundreds of others, in other words they want you. Generally, banks are concerned with issues of dishonesty, not violence and so they have to be pretty risk averse to withdraw an offer and go back to the applicant pool and try and regenerate a reserve candidate (who may well have another offer by now), or accept a gap. For a 2 year old assault, with the explanation you have given, I doubt they'd terminate, but I can't give a cast iron guarantee.
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    (Original post by HelpSeeker592)
    Thank you so much for your help. I don't think the Visa will be a problem as it is based in the UK and I am British. In your opinion, how likely are they to terminate an offer for a caution for common assault? I have also asked my professors to write me character references in case.
    I dont think they will care about your caution but as they are exempt, not disclosing can be seen as dishonesty.

    Regarding Visas, the US, Australia and Canada are difficult to enter with police cautions.

    Edit: unlike most other companies where you can quite rightly say the caution is none of their business as its spent immediately - banks are treated in the same way a job where you’re working with vulnerable people is, and have the right to know everything. They wont care about it but personally think it might be best to disclose.
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    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    I dont think they will care about your caution but as they are exempt, not disclosing can be seen as dishonesty.

    Regarding Visas, the US, Australia and Canada are difficult to enter with police cautions.

    Edit: unlike most other companies where you can quite rightly say the caution is none of their business as its spent immediately - banks are treated in the same way a job where you’re working with vulnerable people is, and have the right to know everything. They wont care about it but personally think it might be best to disclose.
    After reading all the posts in the forum, it confirms my thinking that I should disclose it. But my question is when. Should I do it now, months before the background check even comes in, or during the process when I am asked on the form?
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    (Original post by HelpSeeker592)
    After reading all the posts in the forum, it confirms my thinking that I should disclose it. But my question is when. Should I do it now, months before the background check even comes in, or during the process when I am asked on the form?
    I cant really say to be honest, I suppose they’re gonna find out anyway so sooner rather than later to save you months of stress/aprehension?
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    (Original post by HelpSeeker592)
    After reading all the posts in the forum, it confirms my thinking that I should disclose it. But my question is when. Should I do it now, months before the background check even comes in, or during the process when I am asked on the form?
    If the form says "Have you ever been convicted?" then absolutely do NOT disclose it. Just answer, quite truthfully, No. In the unlikely event you are later questioned about it just say that unfortunately you threw a punch at someone while drunk and just put it down to student antics.
 
 
 
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