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    Currently at a brick uni but dropping out because its just not for me, going to be studying computing and it, anyone currently studying the course?
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    Noooooooooooooooo don't ruin your life pleaaaaaaaaaaaase
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    (Original post by New_to_tsr)
    Noooooooooooooooo don't ruin your life pleaaaaaaaaaaaase
    Explain?
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    (Original post by egdum)
    Explain?
    Please excuse the ignorant person/troll.

    First you should see if you're eligible financially, it's a tricky thing. I know that part-time funding doesn't matter if you want to go into brick uni like me, as I've got tuition loans for Open Uni and they don't count or effect my student loan. You don't get a maintenance loan with OU. You can Facebook comment on one of their posts on Student Finance England page and they get back to you.

    Open Uni is great if you're not feeling brick uni will get you anywhere. Personally I wish I could have a maintenance loan whilst studying my Engineering degree with Open Uni, in which case I would have stayed. You just can't beat the flexible studying, the lack of pressure, not having to get up early and fit around schedules.

    Can't fault my tutor, can't fault the work. It's fun and has a mixture of textbooks and online activities. Open University degrees are just as credible as any other degree and you can work alongside it! It's simply outdated to suggest OU isn't a credible degree, and that's not me being biased, just look it up.

    Good luck whatever you choose.
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    Wdym I'm a troll employers frown upon OU speaking in the bluntest of terms, moreover a brick uni can provide you with real opportunities since they are partnered with course specific firms.
    And Ofc a OU person will tell you to go, it's subjective advice but let's be honest who wants to say they go to an 'all-in' uni.#realism
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    (Original post by New_to_tsr)
    Wdym I'm a troll employers frown upon OU speaking in the bluntest of terms, moreover a brick uni can provide you with real opportunities since they are partnered with course specific firms.
    And Ofc a OU person will tell you to go, it's subjective advice but let's be honest who wants to say they go to an 'all-in' uni.#realism
    Bullcrap, total bullcrap. Outdated bullcrap. Please, let the educated people answer.
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    (Original post by lukauu)
    Bullcrap, total bullcrap. Outdated bullcrap. Please, let the educated people answer.
    So are you saying the Open Uni can secure you jobs just as good as the red bricks? Do you actually believe that?
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    (Original post by New_to_tsr)
    So are you saying the Open Uni can secure you jobs just as good as the red bricks? Do you actually believe that?
    You would be deluded to believe red brick gives you more opportunities
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    (Original post by egdum)
    You would be deluded to believe red brick gives you more opportunities
    It's really just common sense, I guess you'll find out in half-a-decade's time when you see the career difference of your current cohort to your former's.
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    Oh given the context you're doing a foundation degree in construction, career wise you should be fine with OU providing you do Computing although the reputation and partnerships is still superior at red brick, however my point was say you did CompSci at a league uni they'd be the conversation partner with big-shots like Microsoft and Cisco.
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    (Original post by lukauu)
    Please excuse the ignorant person/troll.

    First you should see if you're eligible financially, it's a tricky thing. I know that part-time funding doesn't matter if you want to go into brick uni like me, as I've got tuition loans for Open Uni and they don't count or effect my student loan. You don't get a maintenance loan with OU. You can Facebook comment on one of their posts on Student Finance England page and they get back to you.

    Open Uni is great if you're not feeling brick uni will get you anywhere. Personally I wish I could have a maintenance loan whilst studying my Engineering degree with Open Uni, in which case I would have stayed. You just can't beat the flexible studying, the lack of pressure, not having to get up early and fit around schedules.

    Can't fault my tutor, can't fault the work. It's fun and has a mixture of textbooks and online activities. Open University degrees are just as credible as any other degree and you can work alongside it! It's simply outdated to suggest OU isn't a credible degree, and that's not me being biased, just look it up.

    Good luck whatever you choose.
    Just to make it clear, you can get a loan to cover all tuition fees for open uni however obviously you don’t get a maintenance loan as you don’t pay for accommodation.
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    (Original post by lukauu)
    Bullcrap, total bullcrap. Outdated bullcrap. Please, let the educated people answer.
    You are so wrong. If you can study an OU degree either part or full time , get a good grade, show decent commitment and motivation... that SHINES over a brick-uni student who studied a degree for three years, spent half of it drunk and then decided they want to study something else completely (don’t even mention the debt). I’m speaking from experience, where I got a job TOTALLY above my experience, age etc and I accredit this partly to studying an OU degree as well as having a full time job at aged 21. My employer then sponsored me to study a Level 4 diploma in Careers Information and Advice with the OU also so it must be doing something right!
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    (Original post by Loltait)
    You are so wrong. If you can study an OU degree either part or full time , get a good grade, show decent commitment and motivation... that SHINES over a brick-uni student who studied a degree for three years, spent half of it drunk and then decided they want to study something else completely (don’t even mention the debt). I’m speaking from experience, where I got a job TOTALLY above my experience, age etc and I accredit this partly to studying an OU degree as well as having a full time job at aged 21. My employer then sponsored me to study a Level 4 diploma in Careers Information and Advice with the OU also so it must be doing something right!
    Sorry replied to wrong post!!!
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    (Original post by New_to_tsr)
    Wdym I'm a troll employers frown upon OU speaking in the bluntest of terms, moreover a brick uni can provide you with real opportunities since they are partnered with course specific firms.
    And Ofc a OU person will tell you to go, it's subjective advice but let's be honest who wants to say they go to an 'all-in' uni.#realism
    [

    (Original post by New_to_tsr)
    Wdym I'm a troll employers frown upon OU speaking in the bluntest of terms, moreover a brick uni can provide you with real opportunities since they are partnered with course specific firms.
    And Ofc a OU person will tell you to go, it's subjective advice but let's be honest who wants to say they go to an 'all-in' uni.#realism
    You are so wrong. If you can study an OU degree either part or full time , get a good grade, show decent commitment and motivation... that SHINES over a brick-uni student who studied a degree for three years, spent half of it drunk and then decided they want to study something else completely (don’t even mention the debt). I’m speaking from experience, where I got a job TOTALLY above my experience, age etc and I accredit this partly to studying an OU degree as well as having a full time job at aged 21. My employer then sponsored me to study a Level 4 diploma in Careers Information and Advice with the OU also so it must be doing something right!
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    (Original post by Loltait)
    Just to make it clear, you can get a loan to cover all tuition fees for open uni however obviously you don’t get a maintenance loan as you don’t pay for accommodation.
    That's what I said lmao . And actually that's not the reason, it's because OU is considered part-time study, that's why you don't get a maintenance loan.
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    (Original post by lukauu)
    That's what I said lmao . And actually that's not the reason, it's because OU is considered part-time study, that's why you don't get a maintenance loan.
    You don’t need a maintenance loan because you aren’t in accommodation to be at university. Also, just to clarify, not all OU study is classed as part time as you can study with the OU full time if desired, and complete a degree in three years.
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    (Original post by Loltait)
    You don’t need a maintenance loan because you aren’t in accommodation to be at university. Also, just to clarify, not all OU study is classed as part time as you can study with the OU full time if desired, and complete a degree in three years.
    LMFAO. Even full-time is part time study. That's why you don't get a maintenance loan. All sites will tell you that exact thing.
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    Well, that went downhill fast.

    Yes, brick universities are often better at securing graduate placements.

    No, there's not much difference between degree-awarding institutions once you've gone past the first job, as employers will care more about your skills, abilities, and real-world performance. (Additionally, graduate placements typically mean less for OU graduates who often already have real-world job experience, though this wouldn't necessarily be the case for you, egdum.)

    Yes, all loans are considered part-time for distance education institutions like the OU, even if you're studying a full intensity 120-credit year. This is why maintenance loans aren't available, though they're likely considered part-time specifically because accommodation isn't required, so you're both right.

    As for the OU Computing & IT course, it starts off very slow, due to the necessity of getting all students up to the appropriate academic skill level, even those without A-levels or out of education for many decades. It can be frustrating, but this can also encourage more independent study, and add even more to your CV, skills, and experience. The OU's multi-path system for the Computing & IT course is brilliant at allowing you to choose your own focus. You can go all coding, all IT, CompSci with coding, IT with web design ... Or you can split from the beginning and take the Computing & IT and a second subject course (Q67), and pair your chosen computing path with business, design, maths, psychology, or statistics (this last one is great for Big Data).

    I'm sure New_to_tsr is offering the best advice he or she can, but it does seem to come from a place without contextual experience.
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    (Original post by JollyCynic)
    Well, that went downhill fast.

    Yes, brick universities are often better at securing graduate placements.

    No, there's not much difference between degree-awarding institutions once you've gone past the first job, as employers will care more about your skills, abilities, and real-world performance. (Additionally, graduate placements typically mean less for OU graduates who often already have real-world job experience, though this wouldn't necessarily be the case for you, egdum.)

    Yes, all loans are considered part-time for distance education institutions like the OU, even if you're studying a full intensity 120-credit year. This is why maintenance loans aren't available, though they're likely considered part-time specifically because accommodation isn't required, so you're both right.

    As for the OU Computing & IT course, it starts off very slow, due to the necessity of getting all students up to the appropriate academic skill level, even those without A-levels or out of education for many decades. It can be frustrating, but this can also encourage more independent study, and add even more to your CV, skills, and experience. The OU's multi-path system for the Computing & IT course is brilliant at allowing you to choose your own focus. You can go all coding, all IT, CompSci with coding, IT with web design ... Or you can split from the beginning and take the Computing & IT and a second subject course (Q67), and pair your chosen computing path with business, design, maths, psychology, or statistics (this last one is great for Big Data).

    I'm sure New_to_tsr is offering the best advice he or she can, but it does seem to come from a place without contextual experience.
    I second this completely, phrased much more succinctly
 
 
 
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