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    What makes them good or bad? And what tasks are they supposed to fulfill exactly?
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    (Original post by DarthChic)
    What makes them good or bad?
    Good characteristics:

    1) Patient
    2) Time - 30-60 minutes a week for tutorials doesn't sound much but it is bloody hard to find as a busy vet or manager
    3) Approachable
    4) Target setting/organised
    5) Trust

    Pairing the right CC with the right student helps although not all practices have the luxury of multiple CCs to choose from. Equally candidate selection is important in picking someone that complements the existing team and has a good working relationship with everybody.

    And what tasks are they supposed to fulfill exactly?
    The main purpose of a CC is to provide pastoral support in clinic and ensure that their student completes their NPL (Nursing Progress Log) on time.

    Most will do extra work in their tutorials to help their student with difficult topics and to help with revision in the run up to their OSCEs. However, strictly speaking their college should be handling the vast majority (if not all) of their teaching. In the instances that they aren't the head nurse or practice principal needs to be discussing this with their college.

    It does depend a lot on how busy your clinic is.

    I personally have always struggled to fit in the time for tutorials as a vet and later as a manager. Although I have known of some nurses to spend literally hours every week coaching their student, which is great for the student but is not an efficient use of business time.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    Good characteristics:

    1) Patient
    2) Time - 30-60 minutes a week for tutorials doesn't sound much but it is bloody hard to find as a busy vet or manager
    3) Approachable
    4) Target setting/organised
    5) Trust

    Pairing the right CC with the right student helps although not all practices have the luxury of multiple CCs to choose from. Equally candidate selection is important in picking someone that complements the existing team and has a good working relationship with everybody.



    The main purpose of a CC is to provide pastoral support in clinic and ensure that their student completes their NPL (Nursing Progress Log) on time.

    Most will do extra work in their tutorials to help their student with difficult topics and to help with revision in the run up to their OSCEs. However, strictly speaking their college should be handling the vast majority (if not all) of their teaching. In the instances that they aren't the head nurse or practice principal needs to be discussing this with their college.

    It does depend a lot on how busy your clinic is.

    I personally have always struggled to fit in the time for tutorials as a vet and later as a manager. Although I have known of some nurses to spend literally hours every week coaching their student, which is great for the student but is not an efficient use of business time.
    Thanks for the insightful reply! Isn't it the students responsibility to make sure the NPL is completed on time though?

    I only asked this question because I'm not sure about the range of my responsibilities in the relationship. My clinical coach won't tell me what I can and can't do, I always have to ask if i can do a certain task and it doesn't seem like she has a plan for me. I guess I just thought a clinical coach would do a lot more, like each day I'd come in and they'd say "Ok, here's the plan for today, we've got [insert patient names] coming in and you can restrain this and inject this etc". So far I'm just standing around, trying to work on intuition, but I'm still really inexperienced and have to ask questions about everything. I'm only a few weeks in and I'm being scolded by my coach cause I don't know my NPL inside out. And yet the coach doesn't, despite having years of experience. But if this is normal, then I guess I've nothing to moan about.
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    (Original post by DarthChic)
    Thanks for the insightful reply! Isn't it the students responsibility to make sure the NPL is completed on time though?

    I only asked this question because I'm not sure about the range of my responsibilities in the relationship. My clinical coach won't tell me what I can and can't do, I always have to ask if i can do a certain task and it doesn't seem like she has a plan for me. I guess I just thought a clinical coach would do a lot more, like each day I'd come in and they'd say "Ok, here's the plan for today, we've got [insert patient names] coming in and you can restrain this and inject this etc". So far I'm just standing around, trying to work on intuition, but I'm still really inexperienced and have to ask questions about everything. I'm only a few weeks in and I'm being scolded by my coach cause I don't know my NPL inside out. And yet the coach doesn't, despite having years of experience. But if this is normal, then I guess I've nothing to moan about.
    Very hit and miss depending on WHO your clinical coach is. One of the students at one of my practise had the head vet/owner as her coach and she barely ever got to work with him and always had to bug for him to open up assignments for her to do. Another had a nurse as their CC (who used to be head nurse at a previous practise) and they spend so much time together, very supportive etc. So I think it differs depending on who your CC is as well as how busy your practise is.
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    (Original post by DarthChic)
    Thanks for the insightful reply! Isn't it the students responsibility to make sure the NPL is completed on time though?
    Sure.

    Maybe a better explanation is that it is your responsibility to finish your NPL to get your diploma and it is your CC's job to help by providing support/mentoring/organisation/guidance.

    I only asked this question because I'm not sure about the range of my responsibilities in the relationship. My clinical coach won't tell me what I can and can't do, I always have to ask if i can do a certain task and it doesn't seem like she has a plan for me. I guess I just thought a clinical coach would do a lot more, like each day I'd come in and they'd say "Ok, here's the plan for today, we've got [insert patient names] coming in and you can restrain this and inject this etc". So far I'm just standing around, trying to work on intuition, but I'm still really inexperienced and have to ask questions about everything. I'm only a few weeks in and I'm being scolded by my coach cause I don't know my NPL inside out. And yet the coach doesn't, despite having years of experience. But if this is normal, then I guess I've nothing to moan about.
    I personally tend to get my students to focus on a couple of skills over the space of a couple of weeks, log plenty of relevant cases, demonstrate competency and then move on. Obviously if you have the opportunity to log something more exotic (eg; endoscopy, feeding tubes, enemas, etc) in the meantime take it because depending on your practice there will be some you struggle to get enough cases to log.

    Bear in mind that this is your qualification and your career - take the initiative. Sure your CC is there to help and guide you but they can't do it for you.

    Keeping a small notebook on you at all times to log dates, patient names and details of procedures is very helpful when it comes to logging cases whenever you get around to doing it.

    (Original post by Tw1x)
    Very hit and miss depending on WHO your clinical coach is. One of the students at one of my practise had the head vet/owner as her coach and she barely ever got to work with him and always had to bug for him to open up assignments for her to do. Another had a nurse as their CC (who used to be head nurse at a previous practise) and they spend so much time together, very supportive etc. So I think it differs depending on who your CC is as well as how busy your practise is.
    I would definitely agree that nurses are better suited to being CCs given most practice dynamics but also in having first hand experience of the course.

    Frustratingly in my experience nurses tend to be the most opposed to being clinical coaches!
 
 
 
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