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Deep Thought: Which is worse, failing or never trying? Watch

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    After the first great task for which I, Deep Thought, the second greatest computer in the universe, of time and space, was called into existence for, I was left with little to occupy my circuits. And thus, Deep Thought Thursdays was born; a chance to discover what you primitive beings think of the great questions in life.

    This week, I want you to tell me what you believe to be the objectively worse option failing, or never trying? And why do you think that?

    Some general advice, don't take as long as seven and a half million years to answer, and don't say 42, the philosophers get angry if you do that... the mice weren't happy either, come to think of it.
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    Probably not trying. Because at least you could put in some motivation and effort to make a change and even through you failed its not the end of the world and you can always try again. But not doing anything at all could make it worse and even meaningless.
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    not trying.At least if you fail you can learn from ur mistakes and improve.
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    Not trying. At least if you failed, you know you tried your best. If you didn't try, you never had that chance of success.
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    I'm going to play the devil's advocate here and say failing. Think of it like this:
    1. Failure is intrinsically a negative thing. Negative experiences are arguably more memorable than positive ones; we tend to rememeber them for longer. I.e, they have more of an impact.
    2. If you're going to try at something, it stands to reason you want to succeed at it. (This argument only stands if the person trying something genuinely wants to succeed, if they're indifferent there's no point in trying at all anyway)
    3. Failure at something you genuinely want to achieve produces a long-lasting negative effect. Regardless of whether or not you take a lesson/improvement away from it, you will still feel badly for having failed at something. This, in the majority of people, would diminish thier desire to try again.
    4. Thus the more you try at something and fail, the more you are damaging your state of mind by exposing it to negative feelings - and thereby lowering your motivation to try again each recoccurent time.
    5. So, failing is worse than never trying, because if you never try, you will never know the damaging effects of failure



    *disclaimer: I don't actually believe any of it but it's fun to try and aruge a point you don't believe in*
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    "I have not failed 10,000 times. I have
    successfully found 10,000 ways that will not work." ~Thomas Edison.
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    From a life experience prospective its better to have tried 10000 things and failed than to have done nothing,

    But then again at the same time, doing nothing saves you from the pain of doing 10000 things wrong, each one most likely hurting more than the last. Just thought people are missing the other side of the argument, its all good to talk about trying and failing than just not trying but they often forget how hard dealing with failure is, its easier said than done.
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    Not trying worst thing is to live with regret thinking of what might/could have been
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    (Original post by Kanairee)
    I'm going to play the devil's advocate here and say failing. Think of it like this:
    1. Failure is intrinsically a negative thing. Negative experiences are arguably more memorable than positive ones; we tend to rememeber them for longer. I.e, they have more of an impact.
    2. If you're going to try at something, it stands to reason you want to succeed at it. (This argument only stands if the person trying something genuinely wants to succeed, if they're indifferent there's no point in trying at all anyway)
    3. Failure at something you genuinely want to achieve produces a long-lasting negative effect. Regardless of whether or not you take a lesson/improvement away from it, you will still feel badly for having failed at something. This, in the majority of people, would diminish thier desire to try again.
    4. Thus the more you try at something and fail, the more you are damaging your state of mind by exposing it to negative feelings - and thereby lowering your motivation to try again each recoccurent time.
    5. So, failing is worse than never trying, because if you never try, you will never know the damaging effects of failure



    *disclaimer: I don't actually believe any of it but it's fun to try and aruge a point you don't believe in*
    By the same logic though, would it not be inherently negative to not try at something you wish to genuinely succeed at? By trying and failing you can refine a new approach, but by never trying you miss out on something indefinitely.

    Side note: I approve of the playing devil's advocate in this case, you make an interesting argument!
 
 
 
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