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    I am exhausted, readings are so long, I am so eager to learn but I feel so oversaturated, I don't even have time to go out and enjoy London... I've been told we need to do like 5 hours of individual studying a day, I'm only managing about 4. I anticipate that at the end of all this I would have regretted not mixing as much with other students... Anyone had any experience with this?
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    Do three hours in the morning and another two in either the evening or night.
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    (Original post by TastyChicken)
    I am exhausted, readings are so long, I am so eager to learn but I feel so oversaturated, I don't even have time to go out and enjoy London... I've been told we need to do like 5 hours of individual studying a day, I'm only managing about 4. I anticipate that at the end of all this I would have regretted not mixing as much with other students... Anyone had any experience with this?
    How is 5 hours of individual study a day tough?
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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    How is 5 hours of individual study a day tough?
    When you have on average another 3 hours a day for classes and lectures it adds up.
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    You're doing 4 hours of reading a day, but don't have enough time to leave your flat to explore London.

    Do you sleep for 20 hours?
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    (Original post by needledropp)
    It adds up to 8? Wasn't A levels similar?

    If you manage your time well you'll be fine
    I am managing its just I feel I'm not taking advantage of location and other opportunities as much, time is also spent on cooking, walking to uni, shopping, fixing IT equipment, going to public lectures, all non-stop. Its nothing like A-levels Im doing geography, but so far its been more about philosophy, literature and gender studies...
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    8hours sleep, 8 hours uni academic study and then you have 8 hours remaining
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    You're doing 4 hours of reading a day, but don't have enough time to leave your flat to explore London.

    Do you sleep for 20 hours?
    I sleep for 8, but I think you're missing out a lot of other necessities.
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    (Original post by SuperHuman98)
    8hours sleep, 8 hours uni academic study and then you have 8 hours remaining
    if only it were that simple.
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    (Original post by TastyChicken)
    I sleep for 8, but I think you're missing out a lot of other necessities.
    I think you're making a mountain out of a molehill.

    And to be honest, I don't know what you're getting out of fishing for sympathy on TSR, beyond the obvious procrastinating (which you're obviously quite good at). I wouldn't be surprised if that 4 hours is closer to 30 mins real studying.
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    I study medicine and we're told to do 1-2 hours a day, how can they ask for 5 that's mad
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    (Original post by TastyChicken)
    if only it were that simple.
    It's better to create a time table of the day. Plan out the times your going to do certain things while ensuring you have priorities in case some things that are unexpected happen during the day.

    Best key to productivity is when doing something focus 100% of your energy into it. If you're reading typically consists of reading a couple of chapters and then surfing the internet for a bit, then your reading is going to take twice as long.

    Try this article: http://www.artofmanliness.com/2017/0...tively-rule-3/
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    (Original post by TastyChicken)
    When you have on average another 3 hours a day for classes and lectures it adds up.
    Well, that highlights a useful way to deal with this issue.

    Go to all of your classes and lectures (it will force you out of bed in the morning). In between them, you'll definitely have 3 hours here and there to spend on reading (if we assume that the 'morning' extends from 9 am to around 4 or 5 pm).

    Once you get home in the evening, take a shower, chill, and then work for another 3 hours. Take a break halfway through for dinner.

    Doing 6 hours of independent work a day will leave you one day of the week free for other pursuits. Use that day to go out, cook, do your washing, etc. It's a full day of nothing but freedom. I'd be surprised if you managed to fill it up with nothing but 'necessities'.

    If you need to go to any societies during the evenings, just make sure that you do a bit more work that morning. Besides, you can always rely on the Christmas holidays to catch up on reading that you missed.

    35 hours a week + 12 hours of lectures is nothing tbh, given that this is spread over a 7-day week. LSE is stressful for those balancing committee obligations, and career-related stuff (e.g. application-writing, interviews, open days, etc) on top of their regular study. It's easy if you do the absolute basics.
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    Sorry to hear you're having a tough time. It sounds like you're a 1st year and the good news is its totally normal to feel a bit overwhelmed - you've probably just moved out of home, to a new city, from a place where you were one of the smartest kids in class used to getting 90%+ to somewhere where everyone is smart and 60% is a good mark. Don't worry - it can and should get better.

    A timetable is a great idea. Make sure you include at least one thing a week where you feel like you're getting that London experience - a walk down the river, a trip to the museum, seeing the changing of the guard. At the end of the year you should have at least 30 fun experiences to look back on.

    With the life stuff, try to optimise. If your walk is longer than 15 minutes, buy a bike or a Boris bike key. If there's space in the fridge, batch cook. If you want to go to lots of public lectures try listening to some as podcasts (I watched a lot while doing the washing up). if there are days when you go into LSE just for one lecture and its recorded, consider just listening to that one on catch up, especially if it's a course you find pretty easy. Do set yourself a time to listen to it though, otherwise you'll never get round to it.

    In terms of the academic work, if you're doing 4 hours a day and only doing the essential readings get yourself to LIFE for some of their reading training - you're doing it too in-depth. Personally for the courses I mostly "got" I didn't do the lecture reading (because it was all in the lecture) and just did the class reading. For the course I knew I struggled with I did the lecture reading before the lecture, then went to the lecture to see if that explained it better/to ask everyone else.

    If you're trying to do all the essential plus all the recommended reading - stop. You (generally) don't need to learn everything, especially for the non-quant courses. You're only going to answer 3-4 exam questions per course, so only go into depth on the topics you enjoy. This will also give you time to go off the reading list for those topics, which should hopefully result in good grades.

    Hopefully you're feeling a bit less stressed now reading week is here. Plan a few nice things to treat yourself. If your academic adviser is nice maybe book in to see them and talk it over, or just drop in to see one of the LIFE advisers. They should have some helpful advice, and even if they don't, you'll get more sympathy than you do on here.

    (Original post by manlike99)
    I study medicine and we're told to do 1-2 hours a day, how can they ask for 5 that's mad
    You almost certainly have more than 8 hours contact time a week though.
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    (Original post by Indigo&Violet)
    Sorry to hear you're having a tough time. It sounds like you're a 1st year and the good news is its totally normal to feel a bit overwhelmed - you've probably just moved out of home, to a new city, from a place where you were one of the smartest kids in class used to getting 90%+ to somewhere where everyone is smart and 60% is a good mark. Don't worry - it can and should get better.

    A timetable is a great idea. Make sure you include at least one thing a week where you feel like you're getting that London experience - a walk down the river, a trip to the museum, seeing the changing of the guard. At the end of the year you should have at least 30 fun experiences to look back on.

    With the life stuff, try to optimise. If your walk is longer than 15 minutes, buy a bike or a Boris bike key. If there's space in the fridge, batch cook. If you want to go to lots of public lectures try listening to some as podcasts (I watched a lot while doing the washing up). if there are days when you go into LSE just for one lecture and its recorded, consider just listening to that one on catch up, especially if it's a course you find pretty easy. Do set yourself a time to listen to it though, otherwise you'll never get round to it.

    In terms of the academic work, if you're doing 4 hours a day and only doing the essential readings get yourself to LIFE for some of their reading training - you're doing it too in-depth. Personally for the courses I mostly "got" I didn't do the lecture reading (because it was all in the lecture) and just did the class reading. For the course I knew I struggled with I did the lecture reading before the lecture, then went to the lecture to see if that explained it better/to ask everyone else.

    If you're trying to do all the essential plus all the recommended reading - stop. You (generally) don't need to learn everything, especially for the non-quant courses. You're only going to answer 3-4 exam questions per course, so only go into depth on the topics you enjoy. This will also give you time to go off the reading list for those topics, which should hopefully result in good grades.

    Hopefully you're feeling a bit less stressed now reading week is here. Plan a few nice things to treat yourself. If your academic adviser is nice maybe book in to see them and talk it over, or just drop in to see one of the LIFE advisers. They should have some helpful advice, and even if they don't, you'll get more sympathy than you do on here.



    You almost certainly have more than 8 hours contact time a week though.
    Wait is that what they have? Only 8?
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    (Original post by manlike99)
    Wait is that what they have? Only 8?
    8-12 hours contact time as a range, 50:50 lectures and classes.
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    LSE is tough, and this much work is certainly a good idea closer to exams and important deadlines (not that I did this haha) but at this sort of time I cannot see any need for 5 hours a day, get your work done to the best of your ability and leave time to enjoy your life! Work isn't everything
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    If you take going to university as like going to work, at least 8 hours a day, then perhaps you may have a different outlook of the 'toughness' of LSE. Work life means at least 40 hours a week. Minus the contact hours of, say, 15 hours, leave you 25 hours. 5 hours a day seems reasonable. If you put those hours in, it will pay off in the coming terms. Important for you to get a strong foundation before the stuff gets more difficult and then catching up will seem impossible.
 
 
 
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