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MyGEMJourney
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Hi guys,

I'm currently in my final year of a Biomedical Science degree and intend to study post grad medicine here in the UK (Im fully aware of the process and competition etc).

I've read that it is extremely difficult for a UK doctor to obtain employment in the US, however my wife is American and I was wondering if this helps at all? BTW I intend to be a Psychiatrist if this is useful info.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Cheers
Stephen
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N/A IS THE NAME
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(Original post by SteveForfar)
Hi guys,

I'm currently in my final year of a Biomedical Science degree and intend to study post grad medicine here in the UK (Im fully aware of the process and competition etc).

I've read that it is extremely difficult for a UK doctor to obtain employment in the US, however my wife is American and I was wondering if this helps at all? BTW I intend to be a Psychiatrist if this is useful info.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Cheers
Stephen
Ive only heard its hard for US drs to find work in NHS. But i do know drs get payed waaay more in America- so hopefully it works out. Good luck
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Nerry
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Remember to take a bulletproof vest
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ts4224
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(Original post by SteveForfar)
Hi guys,

I'm currently in my final year of a Biomedical Science degree and intend to study post grad medicine here in the UK (Im fully aware of the process and competition etc).

I've read that it is extremely difficult for a UK doctor to obtain employment in the US, however my wife is American and I was wondering if this helps at all? BTW I intend to be a Psychiatrist if this is useful info.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Cheers
Stephen
I'm someone who's looking to go back to Canada, so kinda in a similar boat. I would suggest that a specialization such as psychiatry isn't a very popular choice (I mean no disrespect) and therefore has low to none competition, and so I think you'd have a really good chance of coming back. It doesn't matter whether you're American, or your wife's American, because as long as you didn't graduate from an American med school, you'll always be considered an IMG.
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nexttime
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This is my understanding based on reading other threads on the topic:

Your wife being american is important - the green card has all the immigration stuff sorted, as far as i'm aware.

Next you need USMLE, the US equivalent of final exams. This is a series of exams you can pay for privately. All the advice on here is that its much easier to do them as you go through med school rather than waiting until after, so you need to be determined and proactive about doing these exams. They are no small feat - they do a lot of basic science in the US so on some courses (and tbf most GEM courses) you will need to learn a good chunk of extra content, and the pass rate is low.They are not cheap either, especially the clinical component, which much be done in the USA (although you could happily do that part after graduation).

Once you've got all that you can apply for jobs. As an International Medical Graduate (IMG) you will be bottom of the pile in terms of priority so I would not hope to be working in Manhattan or something. However, psychiatry isn't exactly the most popular either so if you do stick with that choice it will make things easier.
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MyGEMJourney
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(Original post by nexttime)
This is my understanding based on reading other threads on the topic:

Your wife being american is important - the green card has all the immigration stuff sorted, as far as i'm aware.

Next you need USMLE, the US equivalent of final exams. This is a series of exams you can pay for privately. All the advice on here is that its much easier to do them as you go through med school rather than waiting until after, so you need to be determined and proactive about doing these exams. They are no small feat - they do a lot of basic science in the US so on some courses (and tbf most GEM courses) you will need to learn a good chunk of extra content, and the pass rate is low.They are not cheap either, especially the clinical component, which much be done in the USA (although you could happily do that part after graduation).

Once you've got all that you can apply for jobs. As an International Medical Graduate (IMG) you will be bottom of the pile in terms of priority so I would not hope to be working in Manhattan or something. However, psychiatry isn't exactly the most popular either so if you do stick with that choice it will make things easier.
Thanks for the help, I've heard scary things about the USMLE lol but I'm extremely motivated in terms of study so hopefully I can get through it. I definitely don't wanna work in a huge city, my wife and I plan on living in Rhode Island so in terms of surrounding states I should have lots of options.

Thanks again 😃
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MonteCristo
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nexttime is spot on as usual. Start the USMLE preparation early - your score will depend on how many question banks you work through. Most US medical students apply for their first jobs having only completed Step 1. This means that your Step 1 score is most important as that's the obvious point at which you can be compared to your US peers. Some people recommend doing Step 2 first and only taking on Step 1 when you are really ready. You cannot resit once you pass an exam to gain a higher score and so your result stays with you for life.

International Medical Graduates (including those that aren't restricted by visa issues) are very much second class in the residency match process. Some residencies don't take IMGs at all. You will need to spend some time in US hospitals (a few weeks "clinical observerships" at a minimum but ideally much longer) to show that you have local experience and can get letters of recommendation from senior doctors in the US. The Match is pretty corrupt and candidates are often appointed on someone else's recommendation.

Moving to the US as a doctor is a nuisance but can definitely be done, even for competitive specialties. Psychiatry should be easier to break into than the really high paying/status specialties, e.g. ortho, plastics, dermatology, radiology, etc. You just need to plan ahead (exams, observerships, ?funding for a research year in the US, letters of recommendation, etc) as well as progressing through medical school.
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Junipersblues
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My husband has a similar problem. I'm American, so the visa is sorted but we were wondering if he completes his consultant training in the U.K. whether he goes back to a full physician salary after redoing his residency in the U.S. as required, or if he also has to redo a fellowship? If so, we were wondering if it's worth completing training in the U.K. or just locum for the foreseeable future to cash out and make the move financially viable?
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