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College doesn't think I'll cope at uni. Watch

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    I really want to go to uni but I've been in a bad place with my mental health for both year 12 and so far of year 13. I've had 3 uni offers, two of which are unconditional but due to recent issues, I pulled my Cambridge application out the day after the final Oxbridge deadline quite spur of the moment. The counsellor thinks I'm not trying to get better and they said I need to think about whether uni would even be the best step for me. Advice pls x
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    I dont understand. Why exactly dont they think uni will be good for u?
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    UniversitIes can be very accommodating for people with mental health problems. Things like extensions, personal tutors, counselling etc.

    I would try it and see how you go. You can always repeat or defer a year.
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    Completely ignore your college for this matter, you have an entire life ahead of you, a hasty decision now will permeate through to your pension days.
    Attend a prestigious university, graduate, get a job, earn a salary and at each stage I'm sure mental health & social services will be available upon request.
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    Are you seeing a doctor?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I really want to go to uni but I've been in a bad place with my mental health for both year 12 and so far of year 13. I've had 3 uni offers, two of which are unconditional but due to recent issues, I pulled my Cambridge application out the day after the final Oxbridge deadline quite spur of the moment. The counsellor thinks I'm not trying to get better and they said I need to think about whether uni would even be the best step for me. Advice pls x
    (Original post by N/A IS THE NAME)
    I dont understand. Why exactly dont they think uni will be good for u?
    I would probably say that uni was better for mental health issues, I’m not really sure what your college is on about tbh
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    Yh dont let them put u down.
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    • #1
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    (Original post by N/A IS THE NAME)
    I dont understand. Why exactly dont they think uni will be good for u?
    They think if I can't cope with A-levels I have no chance of coping at uni. My course will have a year abroad too, as I'll be studying German

    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    UniversitIes can be very accommodating for people with mental health problems. Things like extensions, personal tutors, counselling etc.

    I would try it and see how you go. You can always repeat or defer a year.
    I'm just worried that maybe they're right - I've had multiple crises in the past year and almost been hospitalised.

    (Original post by New_to_tsr)
    Completely ignore your college for this matter, you have an entire life ahead of you, a hasty decision now will permeate through to your pension days.
    Attend a prestigious university, graduate, get a job, earn a salary and at each stage I'm sure mental health & social services will be available upon request.
    You say that but I'm not even getting help now, as a 17 year old lol. But yeah I want to go, im just not sure whether it'll be best for me.

    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    Are you seeing a doctor?
    Yeah - CAMHS has refused to see me three times though so honestly I've lost hope for getting better.
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    No-one will know until you've tried it. Yes, it's completely different in the way that you're expected to be more independent and for many, it's the first time they've lived away from home.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    They think if I can't cope with A-levels I have no chance of coping at uni. My course will have a year abroad too, as I'll be studying German



    I'm just worried that maybe they're right - I've had multiple crises in the past year and almost been hospitalised.



    You say that but I'm not even getting help now, as a 17 year old lol. But yeah I want to go, im just not sure whether it'll be best for me.



    Yeah - CAMHS has refused to see me three times though so honestly I've lost hope for getting better.
    If it makes a difference, I was hospitalised 15 times throughout my degree and had so much help from the university I still managed to graduate and get onto a masters course.
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    If it makes a difference, I was hospitalised 15 times throughout my degree and had so much help from the university I still managed to graduate and get onto a masters course.
    Im worried about anything happening on my year abroad too, i know it's not for three years yet but I'm worried it'd affect the degree as a whole.
    It's comforting to know that unis do offer help though - my college said they doubt they'll offer much as uni is more independent.
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    That's a personal decision you'll have to make for yourself. I was advised to take a year out due to mental health by my college, GP and therapist and I went and all ended well. I have no idea whether it was the best decision as my first 1.5 years or so were an absolute mess mental health wise and I really struggled to cope but I may have fared even worse at home - who knows?

    A few things to consider:

    1. Unis really want you to pass and finish the course so they will offer you deadline extensions, leaves of absence, exam conditions etc all to try and help you get through the course. Your tutors are likely to be helpful if you need help catching up and you will have a disability coordinator who can speak to people for you if you need it.

    2. You could also apply for disabled students allowance which could get you things like tape recorded lectures and a study mentor. Also potentially more money to get a suitable room and other things.

    3. a change of scenery can be really good for your mental health and prompt you to make some changes

    4. you could have different therapists and a new care team which could help you

    5. sometimes a big motivator e.g. new friends, passing your course can help you motivate yourself with your mental health

    on the other hand...

    1. you will have no one monitoring you initially for crisis points or checking you eat/sleep/etc - this can send some people off the rails

    2. you have the opportunty for some very destructive behaviour e.g. drink, drugs, sex, spending with no consequences or judgement because everyone is being irresponsible to a degree

    3. you will have a huge change to cope with and new friends to make and a new course/challenge academically - this can send you over the edge if you don't cope

    4. uni can be super lonely if you struggle to make friends

    5. sometimes it's worth taking the time out so you can actualy enjoy and appreciate the uni experience rather than desparately clinging to the edge of sanity and scraping through
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    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by doodle_333)
    That's a personal decision you'll have to make for yourself. I was advised to take a year out due to mental health by my college, GP and therapist and I went and all ended well. I have no idea whether it was the best decision as my first 1.5 years or so were an absolute mess mental health wise and I really struggled to cope but I may have fared even worse at home - who knows?

    A few things to consider:

    1. Unis really want you to pass and finish the course so they will offer you deadline extensions, leaves of absence, exam conditions etc all to try and help you get through the course. Your tutors are likely to be helpful if you need help catching up and you will have a disability coordinator who can speak to people for you if you need it.

    2. You could also apply for disabled students allowance which could get you things like tape recorded lectures and a study mentor. Also potentially more money to get a suitable room and other things.

    3. a change of scenery can be really good for your mental health and prompt you to make some changes

    4. you could have different therapists and a new care team which could help you

    5. sometimes a big motivator e.g. new friends, passing your course can help you motivate yourself with your mental health

    on the other hand...

    1. you will have no one monitoring you initially for crisis points or checking you eat/sleep/etc - this can send some people off the rails

    2. you have the opportunty for some very destructive behaviour e.g. drink, drugs, sex, spending with no consequences or judgement because everyone is being irresponsible to a degree

    3. you will have a huge change to cope with and new friends to make and a new course/challenge academically - this can send you over the edge if you don't cope

    4. uni can be super lonely if you struggle to make friends

    5. sometimes it's worth taking the time out so you can actualy enjoy and appreciate the uni experience rather than desparately clinging to the edge of sanity and scraping through
    Thank you <3 I may take a year out and get the help I need first, considering I'm 18 next month so there are no services in my area I can access until i'm 18 (childrens have too long waiting lists and my area wont refer me anywhere until I'm 18 etc). Honestly I reach crisis points too often to risk it without having the help already.
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    Sorry it just sounds like theyre really putting u down and seems like its getting u too worried. However, maybe try sort out your health first as thats a priority, but dont give up on uni- from this thread it sound like most unis offer great support.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Im worried about anything happening on my year abroad too, i know it's not for three years yet but I'm worried it'd affect the degree as a whole.
    It's comforting to know that unis do offer help though - my college said they doubt they'll offer much as uni is more independent.
    That is totally wrong about universities. Yes you're expected to be more independent, but that is mostly in relation to academia not meant health. They are very supportive, more so than schools.
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    That is totally wrong about universities. Yes you're expected to be more independent, but that is mostly in relation to academia not meant health. They are very supportive, more so than schools.
    Thank you so much How does one go about accessing the help? It;s on my UCAS application that I suffer from depression/anxiety, so will I be contacted about it, or will I have to personally find and speak to someone?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thank you so much How does one go about accessing the help? It;s on my UCAS application that I suffer from depression/anxiety, so will I be contacted about it, or will I have to personally find and speak to someone?
    Depends on the type of help. There's various people to contact, the mental health advisor at your uni (usually part of disability services) where you can apply for DSA and get mentoring for free. Then there's the uni GP and the uni counselling service for therapy. Then you're normally allocated a personal tutor from your department who you can go to for academic help and getting extensions.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thank you so much How does one go about accessing the help? It;s on my UCAS application that I suffer from depression/anxiety, so will I be contacted about it, or will I have to personally find and speak to someone?
    The UCAS thing is more related to stats.
 
 
 
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