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    So I recently discovered that I have Special Educational Needs (SEN) when my A Levels teacher forgot to freeze the screen while taking the register. I've never even considered myself having such needs in the slightest so it rattles my brain as to what made me qualify for it. My only hypothesis for this is that I was probably not working up to my potential as my GCSE grades were not as high as my A* predicted grades. Tell me what you think.

    I will now provide some context to my background and schooling history. During primary school, I would like to think that I was one of the more intelligent kids as I was in higher tier for all my core lessons of Maths, English and Science as other subjects didn't have this. My results from the Year 6 final test were also rather good and were among the best at my school. The problem arises in secondary school where I just lost most of my interest in learning.

    The MidYIS test I took at the start of Year 7 showed that my target level was 8 which was the highest and was a factor in deciding my GCSE predicted grades. Furthermore, I was put in the 'Gifted and Talented' programme at my school which was for those with target levels of 7a or 8. I started to really procrastinate during my time there to the point where I would do HW on the day it was actually due in, though I managed to get by with a couple of detentions. The levels I attained in Year 9 were sub-par with two 8s , a load of 7s and some high 6s. I went full procrastination mode during my 2 GCSE years by not even revising for mocks or the real exam until the night before specific exams. My mocks were pitiful with no grades at A*, some As, and a plethora of grades ranging from B to E. Naturally I tried a little harder on the final exam and managed to, once again, get sup-par grades with an A*, eight As and two Bs.

    Could it be that my poor performance in secondary school despite my 'potential' was what qualified me for SEN? I still don't think that my GCSE grades were THAT bad to indicate that I need some kind of special treatment.

    P.S. I don't have any disabilities, household problems, monetary problems or whatnot.
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    (Original post by ProcrastiBot)
    So I recently discovered that I have Special Educational Needs (SEN) when my A Levels teacher forgot to freeze the screen while taking the register. I've never even considered myself having such needs in the slightest so it rattles my brain as to what made me qualify for it. My only hypothesis for this is that I was probably not working up to my potential as my GCSE grades were not as high as my A* predicted grades. Tell me what you think.

    I will now provide some context to my background and schooling history. During primary school, I would like to think that I was one of the more intelligent kids as I was in higher tier for all my core lessons of Maths, English and Science as other subjects didn't have this. My results from the Year 6 final test were also rather good and were among the best at my school. The problem arises in secondary school where I just lost most of my interest in learning.

    The MidYIS test I took at the start of Year 7 showed that my target level was 8 which was the highest and was a factor in deciding my GCSE predicted grades. Furthermore, I was put in the 'Gifted and Talented' programme at my school which was for those with target levels of 7a or 8. I started to really procrastinate during my time there to the point where I would do HW on the day it was actually due in, though I managed to get by with a couple of detentions. The levels I attained in Year 9 were sub-par with two 8s , a load of 7s and some high 6s. I went full procrastination mode during my 2 GCSE years by not even revising for mocks or the real exam until the night before specific exams. My mocks were pitiful with no grades at A*, some As, and a plethora of grades ranging from B to E. Naturally I tried a little harder on the final exam and managed to, once again, get sup-par grades with an A*, eight As and two Bs.

    Could it be that my poor performance in secondary school despite my 'potential' was what qualified me for SEN? I still don't think that my GCSE grades were THAT bad to indicate that I need some kind of special treatment.

    P.S. I don't have any disabilities, household problems, monetary problems or whatnot.
    I'm surprised no-one actually tested you if they really did believe you were SEN. Just performing badly wouldn't qualify you.
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    not working hard is not a medical condition. there must be some other reason for your diagnosis.
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    Yeah it confuses me to no end but I don't seem to be treated differently from my peers so it could just be some sort of 'title' that teachers take no notice of.
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    (Original post by ProcrastiBot)
    So I recently discovered that I have Special Educational Needs (SEN) when my A Levels teacher forgot to freeze the screen while taking the register. I've never even considered myself having such needs in the slightest so it rattles my brain as to what made me qualify for it. My only hypothesis for this is that I was probably not working up to my potential as my GCSE grades were not as high as my A* predicted grades. Tell me what you think.

    I will now provide some context to my background and schooling history. During primary school, I would like to think that I was one of the more intelligent kids as I was in higher tier for all my core lessons of Maths, English and Science as other subjects didn't have this. My results from the Year 6 final test were also rather good and were among the best at my school. The problem arises in secondary school where I just lost most of my interest in learning.

    The MidYIS test I took at the start of Year 7 showed that my target level was 8 which was the highest and was a factor in deciding my GCSE predicted grades. Furthermore, I was put in the 'Gifted and Talented' programme at my school which was for those with target levels of 7a or 8. I started to really procrastinate during my time there to the point where I would do HW on the day it was actually due in, though I managed to get by with a couple of detentions. The levels I attained in Year 9 were sub-par with two 8s , a load of 7s and some high 6s. I went full procrastination mode during my 2 GCSE years by not even revising for mocks or the real exam until the night before specific exams. My mocks were pitiful with no grades at A*, some As, and a plethora of grades ranging from B to E. Naturally I tried a little harder on the final exam and managed to, once again, get sup-par grades with an A*, eight As and two Bs.

    Could it be that my poor performance in secondary school despite my 'potential' was what qualified me for SEN? I still don't think that my GCSE grades were THAT bad to indicate that I need some kind of special treatment.

    P.S. I don't have any disabilities, household problems, monetary problems or whatnot.
    Although you state no 'monetary problems', maybe you qualify for FSM (free school meals) and that's what you saw? - as you can qualify for it and have no monetary problems.

    There is no other reason for why you would be have SEN; if in doubt, talk to your school SENCO.
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    I doubt that I misread it as my classmates also pointed it out.
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    From government website: https://www.gov.uk/children-with-spe...cational-needs

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    Special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) can affect a child or young person’s ability to learn. They can affect their:
    • behaviour or ability to socialise, for example they struggle to make friends
    • reading and writing, for example because they have dyslexia
    • ability to understand things
    • concentration levels, for example because they have ADHD
    • physical ability
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    Oh thank you for the link! I guess from the overview that I could qualify the 'unsociable' category but that's about it. Even then I do have a group of friends I talk a lot with and I'm not that nasty to people trying to converse with me.
 
 
 
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