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    (Original post by thaliaevelyn)
    I thought it was accumulative?

    My first year of college I was going to do 5 but then for a couple of reasons I wound up only doing 3, second year I didn't get the grade I needed to continue with one of them so I finished the other 2 A Levels and picked up a third AS course, and this year (3rd year) I'm finishing the new course and have picked up 2 AS to pad my timetable.

    When I went to put it on UCAS I could put the completed A Levels as completed with definite marks and the ongoing one as pending, so long as I put the date of the qualification received down, and unis see it as 3 A Levels and 2 AS Levels, even though some of them were started 2 years apart.

    for me, the unis I have emailed have said that it doesn't count because I haven't done 3 in a 2 year period ...
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    Yes unless you are applying for medicine or dentistry. Many people in my school did their first language A level in year 12, and they got offers for 2 subjects only.
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    guuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuurrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrlllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllll chilllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllll. there is always north Middlesex waiting.
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    (Original post by feiow)
    for me, the unis I have emailed have said that it doesn't count because I haven't done 3 in a 2 year period ...
    oh thats good then !

    can I ask what course u are applying to
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    (Original post by Wing:))
    Yes unless you are applying for medicine or dentistry. Many people in my school did their first language A level in year 12, and they got offers for 2 subjects only.
    ahhhh that explains it, I wanted to apply to dentistry ..
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    (Original post by Fire Alarm)
    guuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuurrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrlllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllll chilllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllll. there is always north Middlesex waiting.
    hahahah is north middlesex really easy to get into
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    (Original post by feiow)
    ahhhh that explains it, I wanted to apply to dentistry ..
    I think most dental schools do not accept first language A level.
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    (Original post by Wing:))
    I think most dental schools do not accept first language A level.
    they do its just the fact that it was done early
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    (Original post by feiow)
    they do its just the fact that it was done early
    Only a few unis accept. And are you planning to apply for 2018 entry since you said you did your first language A level already?
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    So, this varies a lot depending on the course/university.

    In general, Oxbridge, and medicine/dentistry/vet med will require you to sit three A-levels in one examination session, and complete all A-levels attempted in a 2 year period. Other universities or courses may have preferences - I imagine many Law courses would probably prefer a similar approach due the academically rigorous nature of the degree, and many of the "top" universities are likely to prefer candidates who have done so.

    This means they will accept and consider an A-level sat early - this tends to be Maths, for those taking Maths and Further Maths, as many schools have students take the former in year 12 and the latter in year 13, rather than concurrently. However they tend to frown upon, and may well reject an application due to, a candidate taking one A-level early, and then only continuing with two A-levels.

    The reasoning behind this is that a student who takes on A-level a year early then gets to spend extra time and resources focusing on fewer subjects, putting them at an advantage over those who do not. For the particular courses noted above as well, they are extremely academically demanding and entail more work than a full set of A-levels is likely to represent. As a result, if a candidate doesn't demonstrate they can handle three A-levels, how can the course providers know they'll be able to cope with the course itself?

    Additionally, beyond the above, native language A-levels are rarely accepted by "top" universities as part of a standard 3 A-level offer, and normally don't form part of the offer unless it's specifically related to the course (such as languages degrees). You would be best advised in any case to take an additional third A-level this year, as you cover all your bases. You may find your options for applying considerably more limited if you do not.
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    (Original post by Wing:))
    Only a few unis accept. And are you planning to apply for 2018 entry since you said you did your first language A level already?
    well, since I'm not too sure on what I want to apply for, I think I might just take a gap year and do something I'm really passionate about
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    So, this varies a lot depending on the course/university.

    In general, Oxbridge, and medicine/dentistry/vet med will require you to sit three A-levels in one examination session, and complete all A-levels attempted in a 2 year period. Other universities or courses may have preferences - I imagine many Law courses would probably prefer a similar approach due the academically rigorous nature of the degree, and many of the "top" universities are likely to prefer candidates who have done so.

    This means they will accept and consider an A-level sat early - this tends to be Maths, for those taking Maths and Further Maths, as many schools have students take the former in year 12 and the latter in year 13, rather than concurrently. However they tend to frown upon, and may well reject an application due to, a candidate taking one A-level early, and then only continuing with two A-levels.

    The reasoning behind this is that a student who takes on A-level a year early then gets to spend extra time and resources focusing on fewer subjects, putting them at an advantage over those who do not. For the particular courses noted above as well, they are extremely academically demanding and entail more work than a full set of A-levels is likely to represent. As a result, if a candidate doesn't demonstrate they can handle three A-levels, how can the course providers know they'll be able to cope with the course itself?

    Additionally, beyond the above, native language A-levels are rarely accepted by "top" universities as part of a standard 3 A-level offer, and normally don't form part of the offer unless it's specifically related to the course (such as languages degrees). You would be best advised in any case to take an additional third A-level this year, as you cover all your bases. You may find your options for applying considerably more limited if you do not.

    right, thank you so much for your very detailed response
 
 
 
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