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Should politics replace religious studies in the curriculum? Watch

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    Would you make politics part of the national curriculum?

    Lots of people are confused about fairly basic political processes, such as how to vote in an election, according to a new survey. The poll, by website Shout Out UK, also found 92% of people think politics should become a compulsory subject at all schools.

    57% think it should take the place of religious studies in the curriculum.

    What do you think? Would you have politics taught in schools, or should people be able to educate themselves about political issues?

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    I think it should definitely be a part of the curriculum. Literally everyone in the country will deal with politics in their life time whereas not everyone is religious or of the same religion. I feel like the important parts of RS could be covered in citizenship (I think most schools do citizenship?). Especially in today’s political climate- regardless of your beliefs you need to know how to vote at the very least.
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    both should be in the curriculum.
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    Don’t we already have Citizenship Studies at GCSE? I don’t exactly remember the content since I left school eons but maybe they could add something about the structure of government to the syllabus.
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    Both are important.

    I also don't think (however, it is important) that with something like Politics, you can cover it in a few years without overloading people with too much information. If it was done over say, a term or two, it would be fine imo.
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    Both should be on the national curriculum.

    However, atheism/humanism should be added to religious studies.
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    (Original post by sulaimanali)
    both should be in the curriculum.
    But only one is real....Politics .

    The other thing that needs to change is that money management and finance should be made compulsory as it effects everyone in their daily lives.

    The teachings of some prophet or God that died several thousand years ago is about as much use as a donkey on the M25 during rush hour .

    ......and I am unanimous .


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    I dont really trust schools to be teaching politics in an unbiased way, most of my teachers are pretty hard lefties and have a lot of bias. but then again who would I trust
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    No

    I think there should be a life skills GCSE.

    Finances.
    Careers and uni choices, including the financial aspects and deciding whether its worth it.
    Cooking.
    Mental health and social skills.

    If I was going to have politics and religion, then I would make sure the religion aspect had a section on being an atheist. think its much changed these days anyway and the scope is much wider.
    If there was a politics section then id make sure that came under close scrutiny as well.as to who tells the truth and who delivers.
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    No, I don’t see the point. All this “replace” business smacks of insecurity and all this neck-beardy lFL Science stuff.

    Religious Education, really is about human history and philosophy - it’s very difficult to get it wrong within the confines of the curriculum to the extent that students will misunderstand a particular religion or philosophy.

    Politics on the other hand - I can see being a major turn off teaching Public law to secondary school students ; and the potential for abuse of teaching process is immense. Very few teachers outside of religious schools would see RE as an opportunity to evangelise. Could you say the same about a teacher talking about the NHS, Trump or the Poll tax?
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    (Original post by Johnny English)
    But only one is real....Politics .

    The other thing that needs to change is that money management and finance should be made compulsory as it effects everyone in their daily lives.

    The teachings of some prophet or God that died several thousand years ago is about as much use as a donkey on the M25 during rush hour .

    ......and I am unanimous .


    Johnny English .
    See this is that neck bearding that I’m on about. How can you confuse the existence of religion with the existence of a particular deity?

    To say religion is not real is as absurd as saying Communism isn’t real.
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    (Original post by shooks)
    Would you make politics part of the national curriculum?

    Lots of people are confused about fairly basic political processes, such as how to vote in an election, according to a new survey. The poll, by website Shout Out UK, also found 92% of people think politics should become a compulsory subject at all schools.

    57% think it should take the place of religious studies in the curriculum.

    What do you think? Would you have politics taught in schools, or should people be able to educate themselves about political issues?

    More on the Shout Out site
    I completely think politics GCSE should be implemented as mandatory. Religious studies should be optional, but both should be available.
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    Both should be taught at secondary level (year 7-9).

    But they should be amalgamated into a single properly taught and assessed subject. Not the current citizenship nonsense, where it counts for basically 0, so no one, including the teachers, give a crap.

    Make it into a single subject with some more catchy version of 'basic modern life knowledge' as the title... a few lessons a week, and teach:

    - Political structures/processes (NOT POLICY. To easily ruined by biased teachers. But everyone should be taught how our democracy works, and how our government functions)
    - Religious/philosophical awareness: coverage of all major religious/ideological ideas including atheism, agnosticism, etc.
    - Financial management
    - Internet/technology awareness
    - Job searching/CV writing/interview skills
    (im sure you could find more to add to this list)

    Passing the subject is compulsory to progress to any course post 14. If you fail, you can progress, but you must re-sit it every year until you pass (as currently happens with GCSE maths and English for those who fail, and want to continue).

    -- It would do the country the world of good. But passing has to be compulsory, otherwise it will just be shafted for the other subjects both by students and schools.
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    Both are vital - teach both.
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    Both are extremely important in the curriculum for the world we live in today.

    I would abolish the curriculum as it stands which is far too rigid for modern education anddo what teachers have been crying out for...hand teaching and teaching method back to the professionals and not politicians as it stands now,

    I would then add in politics, religious studies, finance and budgeting, engineeering, real everyday relevant cooking, and more diverse options than PE like gardening as this is found to have massive benefits to mental health to a high school teaching week. To primary school I would add in nature and gardening, more relevant history, walks that take in the architecture of buildings, more music that is self inspired, more drama and production of plays that interest children and come from them, and more risk taking activities like tree climbing, raft building etc.

    But hey we live in Tory Britain where the very thought we should move an inch from STEM subjects horrifies them.
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    Both should be part of the curriculum. I've encountered younger people who claim they 'don't care' about politics and don't vote, which could easily be down to a lack of understanding. If they left school knowing how politics could affect them, they'd likely have stronger thoughts and opinions on the subject.
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    Depends what it involves. If it's process sure, but that's already covered in citizenship. If policy on the other hand it's not a very good idea: governments will try to influence it to view them in a positive light and I don't trust many teachers to be as impartial as they should in their teaching.
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    Both are relatively important ting, no replacement pls.
    (Original post by SCIENCE :D)
    Both should be on the national curriculum.

    However, atheism/humanism should be added to religious studies.
    Atheism takes literally two seconds to teach. Humanism is separate from religious belief.

    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Depends what it involves. If it's process sure, but that's already covered in citizenship. If policy on the other hand it's not a very good idea: governments will try to influence it to view them in a positive light and I don't trust many teachers to be as impartial as they should in their teaching.
    Teaching policy would be a tad redundant anyway seeing as you'll be teaching people that can't vote yet a bunch of views that will have changed by the time they're legally able to vote. Would be better to teach a more general "this is what a manifesto is and this is how you go and look up policies" sort of deal.
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    Would we as a nation be in less debt if we were taught more about personal finance and the various types of loans and borrowing ?
    What would be more useful or important to us generally ....? Religion or reality of life in modern day Britain .
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    (Original post by Retired_Messiah)
    Both are relatively important ting, no replacement pls.
    Teaching policy would be a tad redundant anyway seeing as you'll be teaching people that can't vote yet a bunch of views that will have changed by the time they're legally able to vote. Would be better to teach a more general "this is what a manifesto is and this is how you go and look up policies" sort of deal.
    While specific policy does change a lot the general policy is much slower moving, for instance the modern Conservative Party has always been more free market and pro business than Labour, even if at times it has difficulty showing it, and Labour has always been more into identity politics, even if the current from (gender, race, sexuality) is relatively recent class warfare has been there since the start whereas it hasn't so much with the Conservatives. These ideological statements will almost certainly still be true in 50 years when the people now in school have a dozen elections under their belt.

    Perhaps political theory would have been better to use than policy.
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