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    Hey everyone!

    Basically I'm extremely tired and have lots of work, but I applied to Oxford last year and begun my three-year law course this year. If you have any questions about the process or life here in general, please feel free to ask them down below - with the caveat that my answer might be delayed should I spontaneously decide to do some work for my degree.

    Ask away!
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    I realllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllly want to do well and Oxford's my dream, any advice? How's the workload? What kind of people do you think Oxford is suited for?
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    (Original post by crystal22tong)
    I realllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllly want to do well and Oxford's my dream, any advice? How's the workload? What kind of people do you think Oxford is suited for?
    Hi! Sorry for the delay here.

    Basically, my view is that the best thing to do is spend time developing your love for the subject you study. For law, it's no good turning up having read 'Letters to a Law Student' and reading the Times Law Reports occasionally. That said, you don't need to have tonnes of work experience (or even any) under your belt. For example, I did an online course on legal and ethical issues in medicine that gave me something to talk about in my statement, as well as reading up on legal topics that interested me in an organic way that didn't feel forced.

    The workload is intense. You will not finish the reading every week, no matter how hard you try. Nonetheless, you'll find time for yourself and your friends, and working hard is satisfying when it gets results. On top of that, most of the lecturers here are brilliant. You won't regret coming.

    There is no single type of person here, as cliched as it sounds. There's lots of privilege but there are just as many people who don't come from such affluent backgrounds. Once you get into a college, none of that matters - everyone mixes with each other and the only thing that will decide whether and with whom you make friends is how you are as a person and the people you decide to mix with.

    So focus on getting the best grades you can, develop your love for your subject organically (and if this is proving difficult, apply for something else), and don't worry - there will be something for you here. Good luck!
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    Thank you very much for your advice.I was quite stressed the past week but I think I'm getting back on track now even though I have tons to catch up. Any advice on mocks/ revision/ catching up? If you dont mind me asking, how did you approach the goal of 'getting into Oxford', in terms of studying? Thank you again it really helped since I was able to talk to someone about my worries.
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    (Original post by crystal22tong)
    Thank you very much for your advice.I was quite stressed the past week but I think I'm getting back on track now even though I have tons to catch up. Any advice on mocks/ revision/ catching up? If you dont mind me asking, how did you approach the goal of 'getting into Oxford', in terms of studying? Thank you again it really helped since I was able to talk to someone about my worries.
    No problem! If you're talking about academic catch-up, really just do as well as you can. You may as well try to study like a university student if you want to be one eventually, which means reading around your A-level (or equivalent) subjects in order to make your answers to the questions more interesting (if they're arts subjects) or practising problems in science subjects. It is this habit that will get you the A*s or equivalent grades that will help you with getting into Oxford and other universities. Past papers were my main method of revision. For chemistry A-level I had done all of the practice and past papers, some multiple times (which can work if you leave enough time between doing them) well before each exam. For English, I had read each text four or five times as well as plenty of articles, and I submitted at least an essay a week to my teachers for them to mark. These study habits seemed stressful to me at the beginning, but the fact is that you have a dream and you have time. You'll also be required to do that and much more when you're here. You will not regret getting into a good routine now.

    Don't stress too much though - reach your potential and enjoy your subjects!
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    Have you got any other tips for getting an A* in chemistry??? What other subjects at a level did you take?
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    (Original post by hello654321)
    Have you got any other tips for getting an A* in chemistry??? What other subjects at a level did you take?
    It ultimately depends on your exam board. I would recommend getting your periodic table trends and the explanations for them down to a tee. Ditto for mechanisms. Both of these are applicable to lots of different questions and there's no point in losing marks because of minutiae in drawing or explaining. Also, the key safety points and points of procedure in major practicals, such as distillation, reflux and titration are all easy to learn but easy to mess up if you don't bother.

    Also the results of qualitative tests are easily learned, and make sure that you have the relevant mathematics down as well. All of these things are self-contained topics that will be applicable in lots of different question types. They can also all be honed by doing past and practice papers, so do them all.

    I ended up doing a language for my third A-level, so that was just down to vocab and practice.
 
 
 
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