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    Ok I want to achieve all 7-9s for my GCSEs and I'm currently targeted all 6s.
    With mocks round the corner, I feel as if I'm falling behind due to the fact I'm underprepared and need to start making mind maps, cards, and cover each topic.

    Do you think in 6 weeks I can revise each subject, and at this stage beginning everything still make it to the grades I wish to achieve?

    Also please share some revision tips for English Lit, Sciences & Maths!
    Thank you so much

    EDIT: I'm honestly so humbled by all the sincere and lengthy pieces of advice I've been receiving, new to TSR and I really do appreciate all this!
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    Hello,

    To answer your question: yes you still stand a chance. You're aiming for 7-9 and you're predicted 6, which from where I stand is not a huge difference, and with hard work it should definitely be manageable.

    I took my GCSE's in 2016 and did pretty well, all A's and A*'s but I'm not claiming to be an expert here, I can just try to give advice on what seemed to help me.

    In terms of revision, exam papers are your best friend. You should be taking a topic; eg. Quadratics in Maths; write down on a piece of paper as much as you can remember about that topic. Then check to see what you didn't remember and write this down too. Hide the piece of paper and do some practice questions on it. Once you are doing pretty well at the practice questions take a past exam paper and do it under exam conditions in the time allowed. Mark it, or ask your teacher to mark it, and then target the sections you didn't score as well on. This goes well for maths, sciences and other 'short question' exams.

    For English Lit it's a bit different because you need to remember how a story goes. Make the book/play your favourite hobby. Read it every spare moment you get. Make clear notes about important scenes and highlight/underline important quotes. Again, practice questions and exam papers are incredibly useful. Ask people for help too if you can. Ask your friends and family to read out a quote and you say who said it, or tell you a scene and you say what happens next. Live and breathe the text even if you start to hate it; you should start to hate it because this shows you're working hard on it.

    In terms of mocks, don't worry, they are what they say they are, just mocks! Even if you don't quite achieve the 7-9 you're hoping for in the mocks, you will learn more about what you're struggling with, and in turn this will help you revise more effectively in the run up to the real things.


    I don't know if you'll find any of this useful, but just know that I (yes, a complete stranger) have every faith in you. Based on what you've said in your post, OP, I think you got this!
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    (Original post by SquishyMissy)
    Hello,

    To answer your question: yes you still stand a chance. You're aiming for 7-9 and you're predicted 6, which from where I stand is not a huge difference, and with hard work it should definitely be manageable.

    I took my GCSE's in 2016 and did pretty well, all A's and A*'s but I'm not claiming to be an expert here, I can just try to give advice on what seemed to help me.

    In terms of revision, exam papers are your best friend. You should be taking a topic; eg. Quadratics in Maths; write down on a piece of paper as much as you can remember about that topic. Then check to see what you didn't remember and write this down too. Hide the piece of paper and do some practice questions on it. Once you are doing pretty well at the practice questions take a past exam paper and do it under exam conditions in the time allowed. Mark it, or ask your teacher to mark it, and then target the sections you didn't score as well on. This goes well for maths, sciences and other 'short question' exams.

    For English Lit it's a bit different because you need to remember how a story goes. Make the book/play your favourite hobby. Read it every spare moment you get. Make clear notes about important scenes and highlight/underline important quotes. Again, practice questions and exam papers are incredibly useful. Ask people for help too if you can. Ask your friends and family to read out a quote and you say who said it, or tell you a scene and you say what happens next. Live and breathe the text even if you start to hate it; you should start to hate it because this shows you're working hard on it.

    In terms of mocks, don't worry, they are what they say they are, just mocks! Even if you don't quite achieve the 7-9 you're hoping for in the mocks, you will learn more about what you're struggling with, and in turn this will help you revise more effectively in the run up to the real things.


    I don't know if you'll find any of this useful, but just know that I (yes, a complete stranger) have every faith in you. Based on what you've said in your post, OP, I think you got this!
    All very helpful, thank you!
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    (Original post by chance_rydes947)
    All very helpful, thank you!
    No problem!
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    As much as this advice really doesn't seem helpful, and quite frankly its hypocritical of me to say...it is possible, if you make it happen. You have to knuckle down and do it now. My advice would be to create a checklist of absolutely everything you need to know, for each subject, you could ask your teacher for these. Then, for each objective write down every single piece of info you must remember under that specific check point. I like to write them in bullet points so all of the information is clear but i guess you could do mind maps or something. Then you know that you have all of the info in one place, and you can work your way through the checklist, giving yourself deadlines by which you should have completed x amount of topics/objectives by x amount of weeks/days.
    Then, which i haven't yet got as far as, you need to find away to actually get everything into your head, for me this would be quizzing with friends and exam questions to a) see what i can actually remember and b) try and learn the ones i get wrong by going over the ones i get wrong and seeing if i can get the answer right
    When im quizzing with my friends, i find that i remember the ones that i initially got wrong a lot better, idk why, but i do
    Yh i feel like a hypocrite thought because its easy to have good study plans, or give and read good advice, but its actually doing it that counts and im not very good at that myself bc i stress too much ahaha.
    oh well.. good luck

    ps, also, if you want to exceed those predicted grades then its not just about the knowledge, its about the exam technique once you have the knowledge part nailed - you need to ask your teacher what it is you need to do to get those grades
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    (Original post by erinlucy)
    As much as this advice really doesn't seem helpful, and quite frankly its hypocritical of me to say...it is possible, if you make it happen. You have to knuckle down and do it now. My advice would be to create a checklist of absolutely everything you need to know, for each subject, you could ask your teacher for these. Then, for each objective write down every single piece of info you must remember under that specific check point. I like to write them in bullet points so all of the information is clear but i guess you could do mind maps or something. Then you know that you have all of the info in one place, and you can work your way through the checklist, giving yourself deadlines by which you should have completed x amount of topics/objectives by x amount of weeks/days.
    Then, which i haven't yet got as far as, you need to find away to actually get everything into your head, for me this would be quizzing with friends and exam questions to a) see what i can actually remember and b) try and learn the ones i get wrong by going over the ones i get wrong and seeing if i can get the answer right
    When im quizzing with my friends, i find that i remember the ones that i initially got wrong a lot better, idk why, but i do
    Yh i feel like a hypocrite thought because its easy to have good study plans, or give and read good advice, but its actually doing it that counts and im not very good at that myself bc i stress too much ahaha.
    oh well.. good luck

    ps, also, if you want to exceed those predicted grades then its not just about the knowledge, its about the exam technique once you have the knowledge part nailed - you need to ask your teacher what it is you need to do to get those grades
    I genuinely will try this, thank you!
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    Don't worry, you can definitely do it! My friend was targeted Bs with a few As and 2 A*s- she got 3 9s, and the rest A* with 1 A. So if she can do that, you can absolutely get 7-9s if you work relatively hard.
    Revise for your mocks because this will really help to consolidate your knowledge. Don't worry if you think you're behind, there's nothing you can do now other than doing your best to try and catch up (don't get too stressed though- it's only mocks).

    For english lit, depending on your exam board and texts, use Mr Bruff on youtube. He does AQA but if you have some of the same texts on another board (check his playlists) then still use him. I remember it being 2 weeks before my exams, having read Macbeth once and understanding next to nothing of it, being quite stressed- then I watched his playlist on Macbeth and everything was fine for my exam. His poetry playlist is actually a work of art. There is no revision that can beat Mr Bruff other than actually putting together your ideas and planning/ writing an answer; if you think you're aiming slightly beyond your natural ability, however, I would recommend doing lots of practice to improve your writing skills.

    For science AQA I would recommend freesciencelessons.co.uk: wonderful, concise videos on every single topic (can be a little brief so don't let this be your only revision). For any exam board, as the person above said, past exam papers are your go-to. I suppose it's a bit tricky with the new spec but try and find other questions online or pick out questions from old papers that could still be used in the new exams. If you want a high grade it is important that you do not skim over any seemingly minute details- it's not enough just to have a general understanding of the topic, your knowledge needs to be specific with the correct terminology ingrained into your mind. For this, flashcards would be recommended.

    Honestly I completely bs-ed my way through the maths course so I don't have much advice for this. Just do practice questions over and over again and you'll probably be fine.

    Good luck! I wish you the best and am sure you will do very well.
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    (Original post by chance_rydes947)
    I genuinely will try this, thank you!
    you're welcome, i'm glad it helped
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    (Original post by niamh787)
    Don't worry, you can definitely do it! My friend was targeted Bs with a few As and 2 A*s- she got 3 9s, and the rest A* with 1 A. So if she can do that, you can absolutely get 7-9s if you work relatively hard.
    Revise for your mocks because this will really help to consolidate your knowledge. Don't worry if you think you're behind, there's nothing you can do now other than doing your best to try and catch up (don't get too stressed though- it's only mocks).

    For english lit, depending on your exam board and texts, use Mr Bruff on youtube. He does AQA but if you have some of the same texts on another board (check his playlists) then still use him. I remember it being 2 weeks before my exams, having read Macbeth once and understanding next to nothing of it, being quite stressed- then I watched his playlist on Macbeth and everything was fine for my exam. His poetry playlist is actually a work of art. There is no revision that can beat Mr Bruff other than actually putting together your ideas and planning/ writing an answer; if you think you're aiming slightly beyond your natural ability, however, I would recommend doing lots of practice to improve your writing skills.

    For science AQA I would recommend freesciencelessons.co.uk: wonderful, concise videos on every single topic (can be a little brief so don't let this be your only revision). For any exam board, as the person above said, past exam papers are your go-to. I suppose it's a bit tricky with the new spec but try and find other questions online or pick out questions from old papers that could still be used in the new exams. If you want a high grade it is important that you do not skim over any seemingly minute details- it's not enough just to have a general understanding of the topic, your knowledge needs to be specific with the correct terminology ingrained into your mind. For this, flashcards would be recommended.

    Honestly I completely bs-ed my way through the maths course so I don't have much advice for this. Just do practice questions over and over again and you'll probably be fine.

    Good luck! I wish you the best and am sure you will do very well.
    Thank you it was really motivating to hear your friends story, and now ik just how much of an asset Mr Bruff & FreeScienceLessons are to GCSE revision!
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    GoConqr is a good website to use for resources! You can make your own flashcards/ mind maps and access those done by other people! Also they have apps (i.e. GoConqr flashcards) in the App Store so you can access those you've made on the go
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    Okay, I've been where you are.

    At the beginning of my final GCSE year (year 11) I was predicted mostly C's, two B's and one A. This was because I was a pretty complacent and lazy student in year ten. Now these aren't 'bad' results by any means, but at the beginning of year eleven I realized I wanted to be a doctor. "Okay, that's fair enough", my teachers told me, "but you wont get to medical school with those grades, no way".

    Reality hit me full speed in the face, blood and bones and everything just FLYING out... If you want a visual for how bad it hit me... just think of Donald Trumps white house administration (lmao).
    But seriously, I was panicking big time. For a whole month I was working so so so hard, spending hours re-reading and re- writing my notes in lovely, beautiful, Kim-Kardashian's- instagram level 'aesthetic', with bullet points and mind maps. At half term, we did some 'mini' mocks (not real ones, but the results would be sent back to out parents sooo *eek*)!
    I was really confident going into the exam hall, because I'd done what I was 'supposed' to do, hadn't I? I'd spent HOURS making notes so stunning you could put them in a bikini, take a photo, and see them in Page 3 of the Sun that evening!

    Two weeks later, we got small slips of pink paper with our results in. Grinning, I flipped mine over to see my A's and A*'s I KNEW I had, and then.... Wait..... No, this is.... "Miss!?"
    What followed was a loooong 'hot chocolate and chat' in my school nurses office, because I'd been crying uncontrollably in my form for about ten minutes. The nurse kindly explained to me that my results WEREN'T bad, and that SHE thought 2 A's, a B and eight C's was a GREAT result. I nodded back politely, mumbled a few words (through sniffly breaths and a mouthful of cookies) about wanting to go back to history, but inside I felt like a massive failure.

    That night, I sat in my room, silently, and stared at the clock on my wall for about five hours. Nobody was in the house until eleven, and I knew that as soon as the front door opened, I would have to pretend everything was okay... But it wasn't... I'd tried hard, I'd WORKED even harder, and I DESERVED god results! Or was I just too dumb... These voices spiraled in and out of my brain the whole night... What was I doing wrong?

    The next day, I went to go see my head of year (well, after the day before I had to apparently). I explained everything to him, and declared that I just 'was not academic' and might as well give up. My head of year (let's call him Mr. Lit because he was genuinely the kindest and most lit teacher ever) laughed at me and gave me a notebook. I was confused, and a little angry he was laughing at me, but I took it anyway. He took out a book on his shelf, opened it to a random page, and pointed at the poem it revealed. I was even more confused now, and when he told me to 'revise this poem tonight in the way that you revised for your mocks, using this notebook' I was SO ANGRY! "What the hell was this supposed to do! What a ****!" I said to myself that night, as I wrote out the poem again and again and again in the notebook, in increasingly fancy and aesthetic ways.

    The next morning, he asked me to recite the poem. I looked at him for a bit, sighed, and then started reciting it. I got to about line three before I started to forget words, and by the second paragraph I had completely forgotten the last word. I felt the sting of tears rising once again in my eyes, and my throat and face began to burn with humiliation. What was he trying to prove? That I was stupid!?

    I don't remember everything he said to me, but I do remember the last words: "don't just work HARD, work hard and SMART".

    Long story short, I ended up getting six A*'s, four A's and one B for my final GCSE results. Unfortunately, Mr. Lit had left the school three months earlier, due to contracting a serious bacterial infection. I haven't seen him since, and even now, three years later, I wonder if he is okay. Because he changed my life. He is the reason I got into Cambridge to study Medicine, and the advice he gave me should be known by everyone.

    OP, dont just work hard, work hard and smart. Spending ages making notes beautiful wont help you- and spending ages looking OVER those beautiful notes wont help you either. Work hard and smart!

    Here are my (well, Mr. Lit's) top tips:
    - PRACTICE PAPERS, PRACTICE PAPERS, PRACTICE PAPERS! I know they're the least attractive option, because it's a lot easier to passively read or write notes neatly, but doing a practice exam actually requires effort, and that's hard- which is why it's the most effective revision technique! Do at least one per subject every two weeks (so if you're doing ten gcse's for example, that will be one a night excluding weekends). I know this sounds daunting, so you don't have to do full papers. For History + English 'type' subjects, maybe just do one 'medium' marker every two weeks, and for maths + science 'types', do one question per 'mark' questions (i.e one 1 marker, one 4 marker, one 8 marker ect ect).
    - SCRIBBLE METHOD! Instead of writing neat notes, get your textbook (NEVER REVISION GUIDE because you end up with less info) pick a page/ sub topic, and try to remember as much from the page as you can. Then, close the book, and using a scrap piece of paper scribble down everything you can remember... Then, check what you wrote against whats in the page, and see what you forgot. Then, repeat. It's like a game, and its was up to 40% more effective than any other method for anyone I saw try it!
    - FLEXIBLE REVISION TIMETABLE! Don't schedule every second of every day.

    message me for more tips good luck op
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    (Original post by PatrioticParrot)
    Okay, I've been where you are.

    At the beginning of my final GCSE year (year 11) I was predicted mostly C's, two B's and one A. This was because I was a pretty complacent and lazy student in year ten. Now these aren't 'bad' results by any means, but at the beginning of year eleven I realized I wanted to be a doctor. "Okay, that's fair enough", my teachers told me, "but you wont get to medical school with those grades, no way".

    Reality hit me full speed in the face, blood and bones and everything just FLYING out... If you want a visual for how bad it hit me... just think of Donald Trumps white house administration (lmao).
    But seriously, I was panicking big time. For a whole month I was working so so so hard, spending hours re-reading and re- writing my notes in lovely, beautiful, Kim-Kardashian's- instagram level 'aesthetic', with bullet points and mind maps. At half term, we did some 'mini' mocks (not real ones, but the results would be sent back to out parents sooo *eek*)!
    I was really confident going into the exam hall, because I'd done what I was 'supposed' to do, hadn't I? I'd spent HOURS making notes so stunning you could put them in a bikini, take a photo, and see them in Page 3 of the Sun that evening!

    Two weeks later, we got small slips of pink paper with our results in. Grinning, I flipped mine over to see my A's and A*'s I KNEW I had, and then.... Wait..... No, this is.... "Miss!?"
    What followed was a loooong 'hot chocolate and chat' in my school nurses office, because I'd been crying uncontrollably in my form for about ten minutes. The nurse kindly explained to me that my results WEREN'T bad, and that SHE thought 2 A's, a B and eight C's was a GREAT result. I nodded back politely, mumbled a few words (through sniffly breaths and a mouthful of cookies) about wanting to go back to history, but inside I felt like a massive failure.

    That night, I sat in my room, silently, and stared at the clock on my wall for about five hours. Nobody was in the house until eleven, and I knew that as soon as the front door opened, I would have to pretend everything was okay... But it wasn't... I'd tried hard, I'd WORKED even harder, and I DESERVED god results! Or was I just too dumb... These voices spiraled in and out of my brain the whole night... What was I doing wrong?

    The next day, I went to go see my head of year (well, after the day before I had to apparently). I explained everything to him, and declared that I just 'was not academic' and might as well give up. My head of year (let's call him Mr. Lit because he was genuinely the kindest and most lit teacher ever) laughed at me and gave me a notebook. I was confused, and a little angry he was laughing at me, but I took it anyway. He took out a book on his shelf, opened it to a random page, and pointed at the poem it revealed. I was even more confused now, and when he told me to 'revise this poem tonight in the way that you revised for your mocks, using this notebook' I was SO ANGRY! "What the hell was this supposed to do! What a ****!" I said to myself that night, as I wrote out the poem again and again and again in the notebook, in increasingly fancy and aesthetic ways.

    The next morning, he asked me to recite the poem. I looked at him for a bit, sighed, and then started reciting it. I got to about line three before I started to forget words, and by the second paragraph I had completely forgotten the last word. I felt the sting of tears rising once again in my eyes, and my throat and face began to burn with humiliation. What was he trying to prove? That I was stupid!?

    I don't remember everything he said to me, but I do remember the last words: "don't just work HARD, work hard and SMART".

    Long story short, I ended up getting six A*'s, four A's and one B for my final GCSE results. Unfortunately, Mr. Lit had left the school three months earlier, due to contracting a serious bacterial infection. I haven't seen him since, and even now, three years later, I wonder if he is okay. Because he changed my life. He is the reason I got into Cambridge to study Medicine, and the advice he gave me should be known by everyone.

    OP, dont just work hard, work hard and smart. Spending ages making notes beautiful wont help you- and spending ages looking OVER those beautiful notes wont help you either. Work hard and smart!

    Here are my (well, Mr. Lit's) top tips:
    - PRACTICE PAPERS, PRACTICE PAPERS, PRACTICE PAPERS! I know they're the least attractive option, because it's a lot easier to passively read or write notes neatly, but doing a practice exam actually requires effort, and that's hard- which is why it's the most effective revision technique! Do at least one per subject every two weeks (so if you're doing ten gcse's for example, that will be one a night excluding weekends). I know this sounds daunting, so you don't have to do full papers. For History + English 'type' subjects, maybe just do one 'medium' marker every two weeks, and for maths + science 'types', do one question per 'mark' questions (i.e one 1 marker, one 4 marker, one 8 marker ect ect).
    - SCRIBBLE METHOD! Instead of writing neat notes, get your textbook (NEVER REVISION GUIDE because you end up with less info) pick a page/ sub topic, and try to remember as much from the page as you can. Then, close the book, and using a scrap piece of paper scribble down everything you can remember... Then, check what you wrote against whats in the page, and see what you forgot. Then, repeat. It's like a game, and its was up to 40% more effective than any other method for anyone I saw try it!
    - FLEXIBLE REVISION TIMETABLE! Don't schedule every second of every day.

    message me for more tips good luck op
    Wow.








    I'm actually speechless from my situation to the country's best uni studying the most competitive & rigorous course!
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    (Original post by chance_rydes947)
    Ok I want to achieve all 7-9s for my GCSEs and I'm currently targeted all 6s.
    With mocks round the corner, I feel as if I'm falling behind due to the fact I'm underprepared and need to start making mind maps, cards, and cover each topic.

    Do you think in 6 weeks I can revise each subject, and at this stage beginning everything still make it to the grades I wish to achieve?

    Also please share some revision tips for English Lit, Sciences & Maths!
    Thank you so much

    EDIT: I'm honestly so humbled by all the sincere and lengthy pieces of advice I've been receiving, new to TSR and I really do appreciate all this!
    I was predicted all 7's and A I got A* in 2 (8) 1 (7) and 5a* they are only predictions you can are the only one who has the power to change that.I would not stress as mocks are poor indicators in my case anyway as I received 7's in my language GCSE's but received an 8 at the end.I can give you more examples as I never received A*'s in chemistry triple only 1 A in my mocks but got an A* at the end.

    Don't worry about mocks it is the real thing that matters.
 
 
 
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