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    B1301 - Licencing Bill 2017, TSR Government



    Licencing Bill 2017


    An Act to enable the consumption of alcohol in a controlled environment at an earlier age and use taxation to link the impact of alcohol to taxation on that alcohol.



    BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's [King's] most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-





    PART I.
    PROTECTION OF YOUNG PERSONS FROM ALCOHOL



    1. Penalties for providing any person under the age of sixteen intoxicating alcohol-

    (1) Amends Children and Young Persons Act 1933, sec. (5)-

    If any person gives, or causes to be given, to any child under the age of five years any alcohol (within the meaning given by section 191 of the Licensing Act 2003, but disregarding subsection (1)(f) to (i) of that section), except upon the order of a duly qualified medical practitioner, or in case of sickness, apprehended sickness, or other urgent cause, he shall, on summary conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding level 1 on the standard scale.

    to;

    If any person gives, or causes to be given, to any child under the age of eleven years any alcohol (within the meaning given by section 191 of the Licensing Act 2003, but disregarding subsection (1)(f) to (i) of that section), except upon the order of a duly qualified medical practitioner, or in case of sickness, apprehended sickness, or other urgent cause, he shall, on summary conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding level 5 on the standard scale.

    2. Allowing for the sale of alcohol to young adults-

    (1) Amends the Licensing Act 2003, sec. (146);

    (1) A person commits an offence if he sells alcohol to an individual aged under 18.

    to;

    (1) A person or unlicensed premises commits an offence if he sells alcohol to an individual aged under 18.

    (a) ‘unlicensed premises’ means any premises that does not hold a valid permit for the sale and consumption of alcohol

    (2) For the word “eighteen” there is substituted the word “sixteen” in the following provisions in The Licensing Act 2003-

    (a) subsections (2)(a) and (3)(a) of section 146.

    (3) The following subsections will be inserted into The Licensing Act 2003-

    (4) A club commits an offence if strong alcohol is supplied by it or on its behalf—

    (a) “Strong alcohol” being alcohol greater than 7% ABV, and

    (b) to, or to the order of, a member of the club who is aged under 18, or

    (c) to the order of a member of the club, to an individual who is aged under 18.

    (4) A person commits an offence if he supplies strong alcohol on behalf of a club—

    (a) “Strong alcohol” being alcohol greater than 7% ABV, and

    (b) to, or to the order of, a member of the club who is aged under 18, or

    (c) to the order of a member of the club, to an individual who is aged under 18




    PART II.
    APPLYING TAXATION TO REDUCE PROBLEM DRINKING


    3. Linking taxation to the content of alcoholic beverages-

    (1) The tax to be paid on any alcohol sold for the consumption within a licenced premises will now be taxed at-

    (a) where the drink is spirits or wine, 20p per unit of alcohol,

    (i) this tax rate will increase by 0.6p for each increase in ABV above 1%, or-

    (b) where the drink is other forms of alcohol, 7.1p per unit of alcohol,

    (i) this tax rate will increase by 0.6p for each increase in ABV above 1%.

    (2) The tax to be paid on any alcohol sold by an unlicensed premises or by a licenced premises for consumption away from that premises will now be taxed at-

    (a) where the drink is spirits or wine, 25p per unit of alcohol,

    (i) this tax rate will increase by 0.6p for each increase in ABV above 1%, or-

    (b) where the drink is other forms of alcohol, 8.5p per unit of alcohol,

    (i) this tax rate will increase by 0.6p for each increase in ABV above 1%.




    PART III.
    COMMENCEMENT, SHORT TITLE AND EXTENT


    4 Commencement

    (1) This Act shall come into force 1st April 2019.

    5 Short Title

    (1) This Act may be cited as the Licensing Act 2017

    6 Devolution

    (1) This shall, upon passing, be given to each national government for consideration.

    Notes1: Increases the fine for providing alcohol to a child to equal that of providing tobacco to a child, and raises the age at which this fine can be levied to 11 from 5.

    2: Legalises the sale of drinks under 7% ABV to be sold to 16-18-year-olds in premises licenced for sale and consumption of alcohol. The aim of this policy is to introduce alcohol in a controlled environment and in lower quantities which is one of the main aims of this bill. Normal licence regulations would still apply so selling alcohol to somebody who was too intoxicated could result in fines and loss of licence to sell alcohol.

    3: (1) Replaces current alcohol tax with a new one based on the alcohol content. This means that the tax burden falls hardest on stronger drinks with the aim of reducing problem drinking. See graphs below for further details.

    (2) Creates a distinction in tax between licenced and unlicensed premises with higher alcohol duty for alcohol sold not for consumption on the premises. This subsidizes controlled environments in an attempt to prevent problem drinking.

    GraphsHere is now drinks are currently taxed as tax per unit of alcohol:



    And heres how it would look under this proposal:



    Effect by drink type
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    Aye (of course)
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    Abstain.
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    (Original post by Wilhuff Tarkin)
    Abstain.
    Can I ask what leads you to that?
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    (Original post by DayneD89)
    Can I ask what leads you to that?
    I am going to decide at division.
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    (Original post by Wilhuff Tarkin)
    I am going to decide at division.
    Fair enough. Not that I expect this to make a difference but some of the ideas in this Bill come from Dave, who led the TSR C&UP back in ... 2010?

    I hope I manage to convince you

    edit: I checked, December 2008-October 2009
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    [QUOTE=DayneD89;74364120]Fair enough. Not that I expect this to make a difference but some of the ideas in this Bill come from Dave, who led the TSR C
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    No, I believe cheap drinks should be valued, if individuals have an alcohol problem the solution is not taxing alcohol, the solution is to promote counselling.
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    (Original post by Wilhuff Tarkin)
    Would it not be desirable to put a limit to how much alcohol a person under the age of 18 can buy in said controlled environment?
    There already is in a way. Selling alcohol to a drunk person is illegal under the 2003 Licencing Act. The limit on alcoholic content does the rest by ensuring a young person cant overindulge too quickly and have the effects come on too strongly.
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    (Original post by DayneD89)
    There already is in a way. Selling alcohol to a drunk person is illegal under the 2003 Licencing Act. The limit on alcoholic content does the rest by ensuring a young person cant overindulge too quickly and have the effects come on too strongly.
    I find that insufficient considering it's being sold to under 18s.
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    (Original post by Jacob E)
    No, I believe cheap drinks should be valued, if individuals have an alcohol problem the solution is not taxing alcohol, the solution is to promote counselling.
    Many common drinks would actually be taxed less under this bill. For example the most common drink in Britain is beer, which goes down pretty much across the board. The aim is not to increase taxation, it is to link the taxation level to the amount of added healthcare and policing costs the person is putting on the taxpayer.
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    (Original post by Wilhuff Tarkin)
    I find that insufficient considering it's being sold to under 18s.
    I can add a line to increase the fines for selling to under 16s to show that there is a difference in law, but as I said, selling to a drunk 16-year-old could lead to huge fines and ultimately a loss of your licence. Seeing as different people have different limits I don't think a limit on the quantity of relatively weak alcohol that can be sold would be more effective than the current legislation is in this regard.

    I have found that the majority of pubs comply with this rule already, and for those who will abuse this law, well they already abuse it now but with more catastrophic results for them and society as a whole.
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    (Original post by DayneD89)
    Many common drinks would actually be taxed less under this bill. For example the most common drink in Britain is beer, which goes down pretty much across the board. The aim is not to increase taxation, it is to link the taxation level to the amount of added healthcare and policing costs the person is putting on the taxpayer.
    That does not matter, spirits and wine will increase in price; drinkers of these drinks should not be punished when the majority of these drinkers do not place a higher burden on the state.
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    Aye, simplifies rather confusing taxes on alcoholic beverages, and is likely to reduce the risk to 16 year olds already buying and consuming alcohol with fake IDs, etc
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    When you can't remember whether you agreed to this or not....

    EDIT: Oh wait I did.

    Aye.:yep:
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    (Original post by Jacob E)
    That does not matter, spirits and wine will increase in price; drinkers of these drinks should not be punished when the majority of these drinkers do not place a higher burden on the state.
    Most do, in healthcare costs. Somebody who drinks 1 litre vodka per week would lose £300 a year under this, and I think that is reasonable in exchange for taking almost 50p off the tax of a pint for the majority of people who drink less than that and are not putting as big a strain on the nations health service.

    As a nice side effect, it allows us to boost our pub industry, which could really use a boost at the moment without needing to put public money into the industry or watch it die out and our drinking culture get worse.
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    umm, your graphs are wrong, like very wrong, and not just because of a silly choice of software to draw them, and minimally informative we're also lacking costings.

    EDIT: the lack of units on the axes leads to ambiguity.

    It's also framed in a very weird way

    If we take our bog standard 1L bottle of vodka we currently have £11.50 duty on it, this will increase to £19.36
    If we look at a bog standard 13% wine we go from £2.02 per bottle to £2.93
    A 4.5% beer pint goes from 49p to 19p
    A 4.5% cider pint goes from 23p to 19p

    The first two being in a shop, the latter two being in a pub
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    (Original post by Wilhuff Tarkin)
    I find that insufficient considering it's being sold to under 18s.
    It's also insufficient because it's one of those offences that could be repealed with no effect, most if not all clubs and a great many, probably most, pubs would have been shut down otherwise.
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    (Original post by DayneD89)
    Most do, in healthcare costs. Somebody who drinks 1 litre vodka per week would lose £300 a year under this, and I think that is reasonable in exchange for taking almost 50p off the tax of a pint for the majority of people who drink less than that and are not putting as big a strain on the nations health service.

    As a nice side effect, it allows us to boost our pub industry, which could really use a boost at the moment without needing to put public money into the industry or watch it die out and our drinking culture get worse.
    WTF do you think most people are drinking if this knocks 50p a pint off when most are paying about that much per pint currently? There are also far easier ways to deal with the stress on the NHS, such preventing unnecessary journeys by drunks to A&E
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    umm, your graphs are wrong, like very wrong, and not just because of a silly choice of software to draw them, and minimally informative we're also lacking costings.

    EDIT: the lack of units on the axes leads to ambiguity.

    It's also framed in a very weird way

    If we take our bog standard 1L bottle of vodka we currently have £11.50 duty on it, this will increase to £19.36
    If we look at a bog standard 13% wine we go from £2.02 per bottle to £2.93
    A 4.5% beer pint goes from 49p to 19p
    A 4.5% cider pint goes from 23p to 19p

    The first two being in a shop, the latter two being in a pub
    Sorry, I made the software to make the graphs, or at least to print out CSV files and then excel to graph them. I'm not sure how you think they are wrong though? Modifying the software to work out the PPU graphs was a later addition to the software but I can put it back if I need to.

    From a quick glance, your examples of effects on drinks seem about right to me though.
 
 
 
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