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What is the best way to learn Japanese for the complete beginner? watch

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    I've just started trying to learn Japanese and wondered what the best method is for learning it. Any suggestion or tips or resourses?
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    (Original post by PandahatDude)
    I've just started trying to learn Japanese and wondered what the best method is for learning it. Any suggestion or tips or resourses?
    Genki 1 and Genki 2 are generally seen as the go-to books to start with. You can probs find PDFs of them online, I would imagine. You need to learn hiragana and katakana (basically the alphabet but not) quite well before you start with those tho.

    Gl with it, I researched into learning Japanese then gave up on starting when I saw how much of a time commitment it was gonna be.
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    (Original post by Retired_Messiah)
    Genki 1 and Genki 2 are generally seen as the go-to books to start with. You can probs find PDFs of them online, I would imagine. You need to learn hiragana and katakana (basically the alphabet but not) quite well before you start with those tho.

    Gl with it, I researched into learning Japanese then gave up on starting when I saw how much of a time commitment it was gonna be.
    Thanks mate, I have learnt all the hiragana already, some katakana and quite a few basic statements/greetings. I just needed to find some better tools for learning as I currently ony use Memrise.
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    (Original post by PandahatDude)
    Thanks mate, I have learnt all the hiragana already, some katakana and quite a few basic statements/greetings. I just needed to find some better tools for learning as I currently ony use Memrise.
    Memrise is amazing at refreshing your memory and making you uh... memorise the stuff (hence the name, I suppose), but for the full on learning it's veeery slow.
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    (Original post by Retired_Messiah)
    Memrise is amazing at refreshing your memory and making you uh... memorise the stuff (hence the name, I suppose), but for the full on learning it's veeery slow.
    Yeah, I agree, thats the only problem I have, I need better explainations on the grammer and sentance structures.
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    One to one tuition with a native speaker with teaching skills. BBC beginners book with CDs. Visit Japan. Learning the alphabets already is a positive start but from my experience this is a tricky language and it will be a long haul whatever you do.
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    Even more important than the actual study materials, get a friend or a study companion that you can practise conversing in Japanese with.

    Since you're at the start of your language learning journey, your motivation is at it's peak. HOWEVER, in a few weeks, you're gonna feel distressed like you've hit a wall where you're not really learning. Just accept that it's something that happens to everyone - that self-study burnout wall. If you have someone to actually practice with, it will help you out a lot in retaining your motivation in continuing to learn as well as help you retain the content easier. This way you'll be practising using what you've learned regularly instead of having what you've learned slowly slip away from your memory as you try to remember* more and more.

    PRACTICE IS ESSENTIAL.
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    (Original post by Zarek)
    One to one tuition with a native speaker with teaching skills. BBC beginners book with CDs. Visit Japan. Learning the alphabets already is a positive start but from my experience this is a tricky language and it will be a long haul whatever you do.
    I am hoping that in the near future I will get a one to one teacher by using ITalki
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    (Original post by Kris813)
    Even more important than the actual study materials, get a friend or a study companion that you can practise conversing in Japanese with.

    Since you're at the start of your language learning journey, your motivation is at it's peak. HOWEVER, in a few weeks, you're gonna feel distressed like you've hit a wall where you're not really learning. Just accept that it's something that happens to everyone - that self-study burnout wall. If you have someone to actually practice with, it will help you out a lot in retaining your motivation in continuing to learn as well as help you retain the content easier. This way you'll be practising using what you've learned regularly instead of having what you've learned slowly slip away from your memory as you try to remember* more and more.

    PRACTICE IS ESSENTIAL.
    I do already have a partner for learning a language and we have arranged a time every week to do languages. We both realised that motivation was a problem as this is our second time of trying (before we did it seperatly).
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    (Original post by PandahatDude)
    I've just started trying to learn Japanese and wondered what the best method is for learning it. Any suggestion or tips or resourses?
    Learn Mandarin it's much better.
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    (Original post by joyoustele)
    Learn Mandarin it's much better.
    Ha ha. So funny Rafiq
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    (Original post by Kris813)
    Even more important than the actual study materials, get a friend or a study companion that you can practise conversing in Japanese with.

    Since you're at the start of your language learning journey, your motivation is at it's peak. HOWEVER, in a few weeks, you're gonna feel distressed like you've hit a wall where you're not really learning. Just accept that it's something that happens to everyone - that self-study burnout wall. If you have someone to actually practice with, it will help you out a lot in retaining your motivation in continuing to learn as well as help you retain the content easier. This way you'll be practising using what you've learned regularly instead of having what you've learned slowly slip away from your memory as you try to remember* more and more.

    PRACTICE IS ESSENTIAL.
    PandahatDude

    That language plateau is real and terrible! I lived in China for two years and learned Mandarin, and that's always when the homesickness and culture shock hit home the most, because all your motivation has just been chipped away at.

    It will probably happen multiple times--usually right after you accomplish something big! The number one thing here is that you don't beat yourself up about it--that's only going to grow your frustration and sour your ability to appreciate the language. I think the two best tips I have to get past this are:

    Finding a partner to commiserate with: find someone honest and just as passionate as you, and then be honest and passionate with them, and get all your negative emotions about the plateau and frustrations with the language with them out! Make sure you're not just negative with that person though; when you're feeling better about your experience with the language express that positivity to uplift and support each other!

    Exploring other aspects of the language/culture: during plateaus, I'd try not to push past difficult concepts or you might grow to resent the language. Focus on lighter concepts, things to memorize, and past difficult concepts you want to review. Then, add in more "interesting" fun aspects; for example, maybe watch a Japanese movie (with subtitles, testing yourself excessively is a sure way to demotivate yourself!) or a documentary about the country. Remind yourself why you're studying the language!

    Hope this helps and your progress continues! I'd love to see what other things people do to get past plateaus.
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    (Original post by Michelle Bieger)
    PandahatDude

    That language plateau is real and terrible! I lived in China for two years and learned Mandarin, and that's always when the homesickness and culture shock hit home the most, because all your motivation has just been chipped away at.

    It will probably happen multiple times--usually right after you accomplish something big! The number one thing here is that you don't beat yourself up about it--that's only going to grow your frustration and sour your ability to appreciate the language. I think the two best tips I have to get past this are:

    Finding a partner to commiserate with: find someone honest and just as passionate as you, and then be honest and passionate with them, and get all your negative emotions about the plateau and frustrations with the language with them out! Make sure you're not just negative with that person though; when you're feeling better about your experience with the language express that positivity to uplift and support each other!

    Exploring other aspects of the language/culture: during plateaus, I'd try not to push past difficult concepts or you might grow to resent the language. Focus on lighter concepts, things to memorize, and past difficult concepts you want to review. Then, add in more "interesting" fun aspects; for example, maybe watch a Japanese movie (with subtitles, testing yourself excessively is a sure way to demotivate yourself!) or a documentary about the country. Remind yourself why you're studying the language!

    Hope this helps and your progress continues! I'd love to see what other things people do to get past plateaus.
    Wow, thank you so much for your input. I will try and follow your advice.
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    Konnichi wa tomodashi?

    Watashi wa yoku nemutta. Dozo. Anata wa yoku nemutta ka?

    Watashi tabetai desu.

    Sayonara.


    (I learned all my Japanese from watching Shogun.)
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    (Original post by PandahatDude)
    Wow, thank you so much for your input. I will try and follow your advice.
    No worries! I hope you get over your plateau soon!
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    Hi! Would you like some help? I took an A Level in it in 2014 and want to revise my knowledge before I start uni in 2018. Would love to try to help on Skype or something .
 
 
 
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