Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Hi

    So my main reason to study psychology is because I was recently diagnosed with adult ADHD. My motivation is to help others with similar mental illnesses in the future.

    Would this be an appropriate thing to put in the PS?

    Also, I am seeking work experience at a hospital that specialises in treating patients with mental health problems, but I haven’t got a reply yet and most likely will not until after my college’s deadline for UCAS submission (15th Nov). Could I put that I am hoping to gain experience at this hospital?

    PQ
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rival Dealer)
    Hi

    So my main reason to study psychology is because I was recently diagnosed with adult ADHD. My motivation is to help others with similar mental illnesses in the future.

    Would this be an appropriate thing to put in the PS?

    Also, I am seeking work experience at a hospital that specialises in treating patients with mental health problems, but I haven’t got a reply yet and most likely will not until after my college’s deadline for UCAS submission (15th Nov). Could I put that I am hoping to gain experience at this hospital?

    PQ
    It would put you at a disadvantage in the application process. I would leave it out altogether. I think universities want students whose studies will not be hampered by any illnesses.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by VirgoStrain)
    It would put you at a disadvantage in the application process. I would leave it out altogether. I think universities want students whose studies will not be hampered by any illnesses.
    Within the UCAS application, there is an option to add any disabilities that one may have. So universities would see it anyway.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rival Dealer)
    Within the UCAS application, there is an option to add any disabilities that one may have. So universities would see it anyway.
    Hmm, I see. I think you should speak to your school about it. It may well put you at a disasvantage but deceiving a university isn’t an option (as people who fake their GCSE grades find out the hard way). In that case I’d say put in on there, but make sure you can prove you’re an able student who can do well in spite of this. If you’ve done well in school then they shouldn’t see an issue at all.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Universities don't see if you've checked the disability box until after they've made you an offer.

    I would only include your disability in your PS if you can make it into a positive, if you can't or it's irrelevant, then leave it up to your referee to include it in your reference (if needed).
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by VirgoStrain)
    It would put you at a disadvantage in the application process. I would leave it out altogether. I think universities want students whose studies will not be hampered by any illnesses.
    Universities can't discriminate like that legally though. It shouldn't put him at an advantage and more to the point, he's going into a relevant field. I'm not naive enough to believe some people would look down on those with disabilities but the personal statement is about expressing your motivation to study the particular subject and it sounds like the OP has something good to write about.

    Many people with ADHD go on to do wonderful things with the right support systems.
    • Community Assistant
    • Political Ambassador
    Online

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rival Dealer)
    Hi

    So my main reason to study psychology is because I was recently diagnosed with adult ADHD. My motivation is to help others with similar mental illnesses in the future.

    Would this be an appropriate thing to put in the PS?

    Also, I am seeking work experience at a hospital that specialises in treating patients with mental health problems, but I haven’t got a reply yet and most likely will not until after my college’s deadline for UCAS submission (15th Nov). Could I put that I am hoping to gain experience at this hospital?

    PQ
    I agree with the above two comments.:yep:

    quoting you in so that you see them.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pathway)
    Universities don't see if you've checked the disability box until after they've made you an offer.

    I would only include your disability in your PS if you can make it into a positive, if you can't or it's irrelevant, then leave it up to your referee to include it in your reference (if needed).
    The disability information isn't suppressed
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PQ)
    The disability information isn't suppressed
    So they can see this information as soon as your UCAS application is submitted? Also, I appreciate everyone's input. I think I'll put it in as I know I can make it sound positive.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PQ)
    The disability information isn't suppressed
    Oh, I thought it was? At least that's what I was told when I applied in 2012/2013. :dontknow: Either way they can't use your disability against you because of the Equality Act. Case in point I got all 5 of my offers and I declared my disability, it only means they're better able to help you on arrival if you're honest from the start.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rival Dealer)
    Hi

    So my main reason to study psychology is because I was recently diagnosed with adult ADHD. My motivation is to help others with similar mental illnesses in the future.

    Would this be an appropriate thing to put in the PS?

    Also, I am seeking work experience at a hospital that specialises in treating patients with mental health problems, but I haven’t got a reply yet and most likely will not until after my college’s deadline for UCAS submission (15th Nov). Could I put that I am hoping to gain experience at this hospital?

    PQ
    I thought the same when applying to study psychology, but decided it wasn't a good idea to include my disability on my personal statement. Instead I just got across my passion for psychology in other ways, and still ended up with 5/5 offers!
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rival Dealer)
    So they can see this information as soon as your UCAS application is submitted? Also, I appreciate everyone's input. I think I'll put it in as I know I can make it sound positive.
    Yes - the logic is that they may need to make reasonable adjustments to the selection process or their communication with you. It isn't information that is ever used to change your chances of an offer.

    (Original post by Pathway)
    Oh, I thought it was? At least that's what I was told when I applied in 2012/2013. :dontknow: Either way they can't use your disability against you because of the Equality Act. Case in point I got all 5 of my offers and I declared my disability, it only means they're better able to help you on arrival if you're honest from the start.
    The data held back is: - occupational background – ethnic origin – national identity – religion or belief – sexual orientation – gender identity That information is disclosed once an applicant chooses their firm/insurance.

    For disability information it's required as part of the admissions process. It's pretty discriminatory if a university only sends out letters to blind applicants when the applicant has disclosed to UCAS that they're blind. Likewise if someone has a disability that affects whether they can attend interview (or if they attend means that adjustments need to be made) then that needs to be known up front.

    The people dealing with adjustments are not normally the people making academic decisions on whether to make an offer or not (and if they are the same people then they're normally experienced and understand their EA obligations well enough to make sure that a fair process is followed). I've not heard of any cases where applicants have been discriminated against for disclosing a disability (if anything discrimination is more likely if they fail to make reasonable adjustments).
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PQ)
    Yes - the logic is that they may need to make reasonable adjustments to the selection process or their communication with you. It isn't information that is ever used to change your chances of an offer.


    The data held back is: - occupational background – ethnic origin – national identity – religion or belief – sexual orientation – gender identity That information is disclosed once an applicant chooses their firm/insurance.

    For disability information it's required as part of the admissions process. It's pretty discriminatory if a university only sends out letters to blind applicants when the applicant has disclosed to UCAS that they're blind. Likewise if someone has a disability that affects whether they can attend interview (or if they attend means that adjustments need to be made) then that needs to be known up front.

    The people dealing with adjustments are not normally the people making academic decisions on whether to make an offer or not (and if they are the same people then they're normally experienced and understand their EA obligations well enough to make sure that a fair process is followed). I've not heard of any cases where applicants have been discriminated against for disclosing a disability (if anything discrimination is more likely if they fail to make reasonable adjustments).
    That makes sense. It's just odd that I was told that the disability information was held back and it wasn't just me who was told this (I know quite a few people who were told the same thing). :dontknow: I mean in terms of my difficulties with interacting with my choices on UCAS, I just directly emailed the student support teams at each of the universities anyway, so to me it didn't make much difference as they knew about my disabilities regardless.

    Rival Dealer
    Good luck in your degree. I also studied psychology and initially got interested in it because of my MH issues, although I didn't include this on my PS as I wasn't diagnosed when applying. My referee did write about my physical disability though on my behalf, it made more sense to do it that way for me. Anyway, I hope your studies go well!
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Useful resources
    Graduates celebrate

    How to write a good personal statement

    Expert PS advice from the people who will read it

    Uni match

    Find your perfect uni course

    Don't know where to apply? Let our uni match maker be your guide

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.