Including disability in Personal Statement

Watch
Rival Dealer
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
Hi

So my main reason to study psychology is because I was recently diagnosed with adult ADHD. My motivation is to help others with similar mental illnesses in the future.

Would this be an appropriate thing to put in the PS?

Also, I am seeking work experience at a hospital that specialises in treating patients with mental health problems, but I haven’t got a reply yet and most likely will not until after my college’s deadline for UCAS submission (15th Nov). Could I put that I am hoping to gain experience at this hospital?

PQ
0
reply
Rival Dealer
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#2
(Original post by VirgoStrain)
It would put you at a disadvantage in the application process. I would leave it out altogether. I think universities want students whose studies will not be hampered by any illnesses.
Within the UCAS application, there is an option to add any disabilities that one may have. So universities would see it anyway.
0
reply
Pathway
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
Universities don't see if you've checked the disability box until after they've made you an offer.

I would only include your disability in your PS if you can make it into a positive, if you can't or it's irrelevant, then leave it up to your referee to include it in your reference (if needed).
1
reply
EveeyBean
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
(Original post by VirgoStrain)
It would put you at a disadvantage in the application process. I would leave it out altogether. I think universities want students whose studies will not be hampered by any illnesses.
Universities can't discriminate like that legally though. It shouldn't put him at an advantage and more to the point, he's going into a relevant field. I'm not naive enough to believe some people would look down on those with disabilities but the personal statement is about expressing your motivation to study the particular subject and it sounds like the OP has something good to write about.

Many people with ADHD go on to do wonderful things with the right support systems.
5
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by Rival Dealer)
Hi

So my main reason to study psychology is because I was recently diagnosed with adult ADHD. My motivation is to help others with similar mental illnesses in the future.

Would this be an appropriate thing to put in the PS?

Also, I am seeking work experience at a hospital that specialises in treating patients with mental health problems, but I haven’t got a reply yet and most likely will not until after my college’s deadline for UCAS submission (15th Nov). Could I put that I am hoping to gain experience at this hospital?

PQ
I agree with the above two comments.:yep:

quoting you in so that you see them.
1
reply
PQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
(Original post by Pathway)
Universities don't see if you've checked the disability box until after they've made you an offer.

I would only include your disability in your PS if you can make it into a positive, if you can't or it's irrelevant, then leave it up to your referee to include it in your reference (if needed).
The disability information isn't suppressed
0
reply
Rival Dealer
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#7
(Original post by PQ)
The disability information isn't suppressed
So they can see this information as soon as your UCAS application is submitted? Also, I appreciate everyone's input. I think I'll put it in as I know I can make it sound positive.
0
reply
Pathway
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 years ago
#8
(Original post by PQ)
The disability information isn't suppressed
Oh, I thought it was? At least that's what I was told when I applied in 2012/2013. :dontknow: Either way they can't use your disability against you because of the Equality Act. Case in point I got all 5 of my offers and I declared my disability, it only means they're better able to help you on arrival if you're honest from the start.
0
reply
prophetkid
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#9
Report 3 years ago
#9
(Original post by Rival Dealer)
Hi

So my main reason to study psychology is because I was recently diagnosed with adult ADHD. My motivation is to help others with similar mental illnesses in the future.

Would this be an appropriate thing to put in the PS?

Also, I am seeking work experience at a hospital that specialises in treating patients with mental health problems, but I haven’t got a reply yet and most likely will not until after my college’s deadline for UCAS submission (15th Nov). Could I put that I am hoping to gain experience at this hospital?

PQ
I thought the same when applying to study psychology, but decided it wasn't a good idea to include my disability on my personal statement. Instead I just got across my passion for psychology in other ways, and still ended up with 5/5 offers!
1
reply
PQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 3 years ago
#10
(Original post by Rival Dealer)
So they can see this information as soon as your UCAS application is submitted? Also, I appreciate everyone's input. I think I'll put it in as I know I can make it sound positive.
Yes - the logic is that they may need to make reasonable adjustments to the selection process or their communication with you. It isn't information that is ever used to change your chances of an offer.

(Original post by Pathway)
Oh, I thought it was? At least that's what I was told when I applied in 2012/2013. :dontknow: Either way they can't use your disability against you because of the Equality Act. Case in point I got all 5 of my offers and I declared my disability, it only means they're better able to help you on arrival if you're honest from the start.
The data held back is: - occupational background – ethnic origin – national identity – religion or belief – sexual orientation – gender identity That information is disclosed once an applicant chooses their firm/insurance.

For disability information it's required as part of the admissions process. It's pretty discriminatory if a university only sends out letters to blind applicants when the applicant has disclosed to UCAS that they're blind. Likewise if someone has a disability that affects whether they can attend interview (or if they attend means that adjustments need to be made) then that needs to be known up front.

The people dealing with adjustments are not normally the people making academic decisions on whether to make an offer or not (and if they are the same people then they're normally experienced and understand their EA obligations well enough to make sure that a fair process is followed). I've not heard of any cases where applicants have been discriminated against for disclosing a disability (if anything discrimination is more likely if they fail to make reasonable adjustments).
2
reply
Pathway
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 3 years ago
#11
(Original post by PQ)
Yes - the logic is that they may need to make reasonable adjustments to the selection process or their communication with you. It isn't information that is ever used to change your chances of an offer.


The data held back is: - occupational background – ethnic origin – national identity – religion or belief – sexual orientation – gender identity That information is disclosed once an applicant chooses their firm/insurance.

For disability information it's required as part of the admissions process. It's pretty discriminatory if a university only sends out letters to blind applicants when the applicant has disclosed to UCAS that they're blind. Likewise if someone has a disability that affects whether they can attend interview (or if they attend means that adjustments need to be made) then that needs to be known up front.

The people dealing with adjustments are not normally the people making academic decisions on whether to make an offer or not (and if they are the same people then they're normally experienced and understand their EA obligations well enough to make sure that a fair process is followed). I've not heard of any cases where applicants have been discriminated against for disclosing a disability (if anything discrimination is more likely if they fail to make reasonable adjustments).
That makes sense. It's just odd that I was told that the disability information was held back and it wasn't just me who was told this (I know quite a few people who were told the same thing). :dontknow: I mean in terms of my difficulties with interacting with my choices on UCAS, I just directly emailed the student support teams at each of the universities anyway, so to me it didn't make much difference as they knew about my disabilities regardless.

Rival Dealer
Good luck in your degree. I also studied psychology and initially got interested in it because of my MH issues, although I didn't include this on my PS as I wasn't diagnosed when applying. My referee did write about my physical disability though on my behalf, it made more sense to do it that way for me. Anyway, I hope your studies go well!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (23)
8.52%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (38)
14.07%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (46)
17.04%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (38)
14.07%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (78)
28.89%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (47)
17.41%

Watched Threads

View All