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Why are the British generally so reserved ? Watch

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    We don't have time for small chitchat with strangers in London. It's just our way of life
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    (Original post by shameful_burrito)
    Man's not hot

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    Ahahah 😂🤣
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    (Original post by Lsheep666)
    "But man's not hot"
    Let's heat him up, then 😂🤣
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    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    Keep trying. Sooner or later, you will break through
    Hmm, but If I keep trying and I come across the wrong people, they might think I'm awkward or just annoying 😅😶😓
    Anyway.. Thanks for your your word of encouragement! But I guess, you are just being polite 😜🤣
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    We don't have time for small chitchat with strangers in London. It's just our way of life
    Understandable, as London is such busy and dinamic city, where everything flows at a fast face .. People are always on a rush, fully submerged into their daily routine ..
    But, I was not referring particularly to strangers ,but to people you see or meet every day .. At work, at the shop(s) or next to your doorstep (neighbours) ..
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    I am an Asian American and found the British people (strangers in public areas) quite friendly, helpful and polite. I had strangers offer to help me at the train station with my luggage, give advice on the best station to get a transfer and most of taxi drivers happily tell me stories while taking me to my destination.

    Maybe people are reserved or shy in different situations. I found a lot of people that were happy to partake in a conversation in London and in the Southern areas of the UK with a friendly smile and a polite question. 😊
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    (Original post by ckfeister)
    No, not really I did say " part " I do not relate to British people, all of my friends are migrants, ethnic minorities or people international.
    I’m literally the complete opposite to you😂 an ethnic minority myself, moved here as a very young child, all of my friends are white and I’m probably more British than half of them😅
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    (Original post by zq01)
    I’m literally the complete opposite to you😂 an ethnic minority myself, moved here as a very young child, all of my friends are white and I’m probably more British than half of them😅
    Haha, I do notice some ethnic minorities act more British than some borned here Brits.
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    (Original post by ckfeister)
    Haha, I do notice some ethnic minorities act more British than some borned here Brits.
    Truest thing I’ve heard today
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    I've lived in 3/4 countries of the UK so I'll try to break what I found down.
    These are very big generalisations! Just what I discovered personally, could be wrong ^^;

    England (South) - people keep very much to themselves, but don't react badly to conversation if you start it. People do seem to just find some friends and then stick rigidly to them, though. In fact a lot of "new friends" you make are ones introduced by your old friends. Clubbing seems to be the main form of entertainment and socialising, which could possibly help.

    Wales (North) - people are very friendly. You might not exactly be asked out for crumpets per se, but I found they were the easiest to start conversation with and build rapport with. They take a fairly keen interest in people from other places that aren't England.

    Wales (South) - people are very willing to make acquaintances, but very resistant to making friends. Many know each other from school or work and that can be isolating for an outsider. My experience is only based on Cardiff though, and capital cities are very different to anywhere else and harder to socialise in

    Northern Ireland - sort of the same problem about everyone already knowing each other, but I found they were much more willing to include you. Don't know if you're the drinking sort, but I managed to make a fair few friends just by going out to the bar of an evening.

    Scotland I hear people are very open and quick to include, but I haven't gone there enough to know for sure.

    I hope at least some part of this helped and wasn't a rambling mess ;-;
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    (Original post by CastCuraga)
    I've lived in 3/4 countries of the UK so I'll try to break what I found down.
    These are very big generalisations! Just what I discovered personally, could be wrong ^^;

    England (South) - people keep very much to themselves, but don't react badly to conversation if you start it. People do seem to just find some friends and then stick rigidly to them, though. In fact a lot of "new friends" you make are ones introduced by your old friends. Clubbing seems to be the main form of entertainment and socialising, which could possibly help.

    Wales (North) - people are very friendly. You might not exactly be asked out for crumpets per se, but I found they were the easiest to start conversation with and build rapport with. They take a fairly keen interest in people from other places that aren't England.

    Wales (South) - people are very willing to make acquaintances, but very resistant to making friends. Many know each other from school or work and that can be isolating for an outsider. My experience is only based on Cardiff though, and capital cities are very different to anywhere else and harder to socialise in

    Northern Ireland - sort of the same problem about everyone already knowing each other, but I found they were much more willing to include you. Don't know if you're the drinking sort, but I managed to make a fair few friends just by going out to the bar of an evening.

    Scotland I hear people are very open and quick to include, but I haven't gone there enough to know for sure.

    I hope at least some part of this helped and wasn't a rambling mess ;-;
    Wow! That's intriguing! Interesting and comprehensive social guide! Thanks for sharing this 😉
    Although, I'm still aware everyone is different and this can't be a really extended to the billions of Brits populating the U.K. Don't get me wrong, even though they do tend to be generally reserved or detached in some situations or in public, I've got nothing against the Brits .. As far as I've seen, I've met much nicer people down here than in Italy .. One of the feature I do really appreciate among the Brits (either English, Welsh, Irish..etc) is their absolute politeness and self restraint in every situation in public .. Although sometime they might not look natural .. anyway, as I come from Italy, our society has always been encouraging everyone to be more emotional and to lose control much easily, especially in the worst scenarios .. That's why either the Spanish, Portuguese, either the Hispanic (South Americans), or the Greek as well as many of the Eastern Europeans tend to be generally more impulsive .. so, as I moved in the U.K., even though I've always been raised with good manners and politeness , I needed to train myself to contain my emotions, not showing them to people ..which was (and is still being now) really hard for me .. I think sometime if it's about small matter , it may be worthing to keep calm and chilled .. But sometime, when I feel it's necessary for my wellbeing, it can't help .. You need to come out from your smile, your acquiescence or indifference , and show or tell people you are not happy with something you are not comfortable with. And I think living in a such reserved and self-restrained society does not help this at all .. ! It does not promote individual well-being, after all. People are so reserved at the end of the day, in a way that they will easily retain all their emotions in, and perhaps someday they may explode in their depression , frustration and mental stress (However, I don't wish this to anyone)..
    So, I've been wondering whether the common affection and attachment to alcohol in this country might be explained in such terms .. I've noticed that in many Southern European countries alcohol is definitely not the main form of entairtaiment.. Some people may like drinking but just on on occasions (likely in the weekend) not on a daily basis (after work or school).

    Anyway, a part from all this, among the Brits I've met, I found the Welsh to be the most lovely and caring one. Absolutely awsome people. Even though very sensitive and excessively nationalist . People from the the Midlands and the North West England (Cheshire) are generally lovely, and quite a few I encountered really helpful with directions (this is seems to be a common British feature, just love that, you will hardly see this in other countries). And I love the fact that most of them in this area will smile at you 😊 But this won't happen in London, and other great cities for example , and less likely in few other parts of the U.K. , such as the South ,perhaps (?)
    Can't speak for the Irish and the Scottish, but I would definitely like to some of them 😊 I've been told the Scottish are very patriottic, as much as the Welsh.. And the Irish, from what I've heard, are very family-orientated, as much as the Welsh.. Is that right ..?
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    (Original post by mandmdye)
    I am an Asian American and found the British people (strangers in public areas) quite friendly, helpful and polite. I had strangers offer to help me at the train station with my luggage, give advice on the best station to get a transfer and most of taxi drivers happily tell me stories while taking me to my destination.

    Maybe people are reserved or shy in different situations. I found a lot of people that were happy to partake in a conversation in London and in the Southern areas of the UK with a friendly smile and a polite question. 😊
    Honestly, I do agree with all you have said, as , taking about my own experience, I've been treated the same. In few areas of the U.K. (North West England, Wales , Midlands) except from the South and the very Northern England (near Scotland) where , obviously I can't speak for, as I I've never been. People are generally very polite, gentle and (quite a few) definitely the most lovely you could find. But, the thing is, when it comes to acquaintances, everyone (except from the exceptionally extrovert one) is generally friendly or sociable. Most of them are keen to having small conversations with you , especially with strangers on the train, if they feel so. But when it comes to getting people down to a more personal or inner level, they can be very reserved. So quite resistant to create intimate bonds such as friendship or whatever .. (however never gone myself for 'whatever' ahah so just assuming this🤣)
    Not all. But most.
    Unfortunately, talking to a stranger, it doesn't guarantee that person will become your friend or talk to you back the second time..
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    Personally I think that goes more for English ppl than the rest of us.
    English guys I've dated have always been sooo awkward and they act like virgins (even when you know they're not).
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    Legacy of Olive Cromwell and Queen Victoria I blame.
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    (Original post by Allemagne)
    It's actually racism as I find them also to be very patronising to me.
    Sorry, can I ask you why you think it's 'racism'..? Fortunately, I've never met racist people down here, as I'm always been treated fairly by the people I've met. To be honest, I've met more racist in Italy and perhaps in some parts of France, than here. But of course, with this I don't mean there are no racist in the U.K., as, unfortunately, there are racists everywhere..
    I think the German are not very different from the British , although they seem to be hating each other for some reason.
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    (Original post by Ling91)
    Sorry, can I ask you why you think it's 'racism'..? Fortunately, I've never met racist people down here, as I'm always been treated fairly by the people I've met. To be honest, I've met more racist in Italy and perhaps in some parts of France.
    I think the German are not very different from the British , although they would hate each other for some reason.
    Germans are not similar to the British so I'm not sure where that comes from? Pretty much all cultural aspects are different (food, customs, religion, traditions) and English people struggle speaking German.
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    (Original post by KingHarold)
    Legacy of Olive Cromwell and Queen Victoria I blame.
    AHAHAhahah 😂😂 Sorry, King Harold or whatever your name is, I have had an exhausting and challenging day today (really wanted to cry after I had to be dealing with a
    dufficult child) and you have just made me laugh ahahah 😂😂

    Thanks for that. Y

    Ps: Just for curiousity.. are you obsessed about O. Cromwell and Queen Victoria . .? Or you might just have a sort of.. peculiar passion for them..
    But, don't get me wrong, I used to love English History when I went to high school 😉
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    (Original post by December126)
    Personally I think that goes more for English ppl than the rest of us.
    English guys I've dated have always been sooo awkward and they act like virgins (even when you know they're not).
    Tell me.. When you say.. 'the rest of us' what part or country of the UK you are referring to..?
    Now I'm intrigued..Then, in what way would they have been so awkward ..? Ahaha
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    (Original post by Allemagne)
    Germans are not similar to the British so I'm not sure where that comes from? Pretty much all cultural aspects are different (food, customs, religion, traditions) and English people struggle speaking German.
    Well, debatable. For some aspect(s), they may be certainly different , for others not really. I'll list you an example here that you might know: If you just think the origin of Queen Elizabeth herself and quite a few members of the Royal Family .. Where do they come from originally .. Hannover ..Hannover did come from a German lineage .. [double check this..]
    Then dating back to (not the proper Britons) from the English ancestors .. Where did they come from..?

    Anglo-Saxon [Saxon is a east-central region of Germany, double check this]
    The language may be different for many aspects , as English language have been under the influence of another European languages for centuries [French, Celtic languages, Latin thanks to several Roman settlements or military campaigns in Great Britain].. But philology will have still descending from common roots
    Then .. Do you think the German food is so much different from the British ..?

    Just think about how many potatoes and sausages are being featuring in both.. They have always been present in both cuisines for ages
    And then think about .. Alcohol .. It's part of the culture and traditions in both countries ..
    Germany by not chance one of the major producer of Beer. Think
    about the Oktoberfest ..
    There are so many different areas and counties in the UK where beer is been largely consumed and produced .. Do many brew manufacturers exist in the U.K..
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    (Original post by Ling91)
    Now, I'm curious .. How are the Americans, then ..? Are they generally very different from the British in terms of good manners ..?
    The 'typical' American is often very openly friendly and smiley. They will openly chat with you even if you're a stranger. This is a generalisation of course, but Americans are far more publicly outgoing and friendly than us Brits. Not really sure why, but hey!
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