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    I was just wondering how people who are already students find being vegan at uni because it worries me moving away from home that it will be much more expense than the average cost for food each week as well as any other advice please
    Much appreciated
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    (Original post by CaitlinM1)
    I was just wondering how people who are already students find being vegan at uni because it worries me moving away from home that it will be much more expense than the average cost for food each week as well as any other advice please
    Much appreciated
    Cost is definitely a big factor but if you choose a lifestyle then you have to be able to keep it up unfortunately and that is true of any lifestyle choice. Why not check out our food and drink forum and particularly this thread
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    (Original post by CaitlinM1)
    I was just wondering how people who are already students find being vegan at uni because it worries me moving away from home that it will be much more expense than the average cost for food each week as well as any other advice please
    Much appreciated
    Hi!

    I'm in my third year at Sheffield Hallam University. I went vegan on the day that I moved out (as my mum wouldn't let me be fully vegan at home). Although this means I can't really compare it to being vegan at home, I can tell you how I've been finding it!

    As for cost of food, I definitely spend less each week on a food shop than my non-vegan flatmates do. I don't really buy any dairy/meat replacements except for on occasion, but I spend up to £20 per week on veggies, beans, pasta, soup, bread, rice, porridge oats/cereal, stir fry meals and sauces, fruit and snacks and whatever else. Then if I fancy treating myself I'll get some vegan cheese or Sainsbury's vegan lasagne or some ice cream or something, but again, they're not as regular for me. This might be a change for you from being away from home, but obviously you can go out and spend more if you'd prefer to have those replacements or more fancy ingredients! I go for the basic ones haha.

    It's also going to depend on the city you move to, but when I came to uni (in Sheffield) I found an amazing community of vegans as well as quite a lot of vegan options in terms of cafes and restaurants that I hadn't had at all in my hometown. I joined a vegan society at uni, and met lots of vegan people and discovered places to eat or just hang out, campaigns I could join in with if I wanted to, but most of all it was great to just be around like minded people. Your uni will probably have one too, but if not you could start one yourself!

    If you haven't got your heart set on a certain city or uni yet then have a look where some of the top cities for vegans are, because it's so exciting to find a place with a great community!

    Hope this helps

    Ellie
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    (Original post by SHUGURU)
    Hi!

    I'm in my third year at Sheffield Hallam University. I went vegan on the day that I moved out (as my mum wouldn't let me be fully vegan at home). Although this means I can't really compare it to being vegan at home, I can tell you how I've been finding it!

    As for cost of food, I definitely spend less each week on a food shop than my non-vegan flatmates do. I don't really buy any dairy/meat replacements except for on occasion, but I spend up to £20 per week on veggies, beans, pasta, soup, bread, rice, porridge oats/cereal, stir fry meals and sauces, fruit and snacks and whatever else. Then if I fancy treating myself I'll get some vegan cheese or Sainsbury's vegan lasagne or some ice cream or something, but again, they're not as regular for me. This might be a change for you from being away from home, but obviously you can go out and spend more if you'd prefer to have those replacements or more fancy ingredients! I go for the basic ones haha.

    It's also going to depend on the city you move to, but when I came to uni (in Sheffield) I found an amazing community of vegans as well as quite a lot of vegan options in terms of cafes and restaurants that I hadn't had at all in my hometown. I joined a vegan society at uni, and met lots of vegan people and discovered places to eat or just hang out, campaigns I could join in with if I wanted to, but most of all it was great to just be around like minded people. Your uni will probably have one too, but if not you could start one yourself!

    If you haven't got your heart set on a certain city or uni yet then have a look where some of the top cities for vegans are, because it's so exciting to find a place with a great community!

    Hope this helps

    Ellie
    Thank you so much! This is perfect! I'm looking at Scottish uni's and I find it Scotland alone there isn't a great deal of vegan options or shops etc
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    I'm only veggie, not vegan as I rely on cheese too much, but for me I haven't found costs to be an issue - and I live in York which can be pricey. I live with my boyfriend who is a big meat eater, so we don't share food. But he always spends significantly more than me on food, as he buys big packs of meat; whereas I'm buying lots of things for the same amount of money e.g. pasta, cheese, bread, rice, wraps, sauces. It depends on what vegan food you eat, but on average the cost probably works out fairly similar to what a typical non-vegan buys.
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    if you're not buying replacements then it shouldn't be too expensive, just shop around a bit for food and things will turn out cheaper than you might originally think.
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    Veganism is only expensive if you're buying replacement foods, like vegan cheese and stuff like that. But those aren't necessary.
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    (Original post by CaitlinM1)
    I was just wondering how people who are already students find being vegan at uni because it worries me moving away from home that it will be much more expense than the average cost for food each week as well as any other advice please
    Much appreciated
    Costs should not be such a huge problem tbh. You can always balance it out. Veggies would cost you less than buying meat every week. And if you are looking for replacements or fancy ingredients, then maybe not buy them on a regular basis would help. Try other recipes such as Indian, Mexican where you will find flavours without having to spend too much. It really will come down to how you manage it. But it should most definitely not be such a huge problem.
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    (Original post by prophetkid)
    I'm only veggie, not vegan as I rely on cheese too much, but for me I haven't found costs to be an issue - and I live in York which can be pricey. I live with my boyfriend who is a big meat eater, so we don't share food. But he always spends significantly more than me on food, as he buys big packs of meat; whereas I'm buying lots of things for the same amount of money e.g. pasta, cheese, bread, rice, wraps, sauces. It depends on what vegan food you eat, but on average the cost probably works out fairly similar to what a typical non-vegan buys.
    In general food costs at uni for guys tend to be 50%+ more compared to girls so this might not be the best comparison lol
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    (Original post by CaitlinM1)
    I was just wondering how people who are already students find being vegan at uni because it worries me moving away from home that it will be much more expense than the average cost for food each week as well as any other advice please
    Much appreciated
    Hi, Vegan Student here

    Veganism, whereever you are, is only expensie if you make it expensive. If you buy all the meat and dairy substitues, it's going to be costly. So just don't buy them. Or treat yourself to them every once in a while. But not on a weekly basis. One food shop I can spend about £20 and that will last me at LEAST a week and a half. The only substitues I buy are Almond milk, Tofu and LM Sausages. 1 Box of sausages lasts me 2 weeks. 3 on a tuesday for lunch with Pasta and frozen mixed Veg. Perfect lunch to take to lectures. Other meals I make all last about 4 meals. Eat one meal, put 1 in the fridge and 2 in the freezer. One I eat straight away, the fridge one, I eat for lunch the next day and then I make dinner from scratch with the other fresh ingredients. When the fresh ingredients are used up, I then eat the frozen meals. If you buy pasta, rice and frozen mixed veg you are basically sorted. 1 Box of tofu will last me 2 meals (used to last 1 but I realised I needed to stretch it out... lol). Fresh Veggies from farmers markets are great and cheap but if there isn't a farmers market in your town, the shop veg is still cheap. Onions, Garlic and Ginger and you're sorted. Some peppers, carrots, cauliflower, mushrooms. Perfect. Get some red lentils (big bags are about £1.80 and will last for ages!) and make a dahl. That will last for about 4 or 5 meals depending on portion size (and midnight snacks!). Veggies are your friend. Some condiments too. The condiments can add up a fair bit at the beginning but they also last forever. Condiments such as Soy sauce, mustard, hoisin sauce, ketchup, sweet chili sauce. I don't always eat the same meals every week. But I use up everything I have until I realise I can't live off just Ketchup and then I decide what I will make, and therefore need, for the next shop.

    Following on from that last bit, meal planning is SO good for budgeting. Get a meal planner from Amaon. They're about 3 quid and are awesome. Get one for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Set aside an hour every Sunday/ whenever you run out of food to make a list of all the food you will make that week and then make a list of everything you will need. Go onto online shopping website of choice (tesco is good at the moment but when I started 4 weeks ago, sainsburys was cheapest, so it's good to check for deals), put everything in and see how much it is. Depending on the price, and your budget, go through and filter out what you absolutely don't need.

    Still with the meal plans - STICK TO IT. This will honestly save your life. It's okay if you want to switch wenesday and thursdays dinner around if you don't feel like eating whatever it was that was planned for that evening, but don't change meals altogether because that will mess up the food and mess up your brain and will confuse you and it's HIGHLY likely that the food will go off and everything just goes crazy. So stick to the meal plan.

    As for breakfast, You can buy a really nice Easy Porrdige box from Tesco. It has I think 10 sachets in, add some milk, microwave, done. It's like a golden syrupy flavour. It's really nice and it's really cheap but most importantly, it fills you up beyond belief.

    Bread is another cheap and cheerful option for toast in the mornings. Buy a loaf and freeze it. When you want toast, just shove the frozen bread in the microwave for 15 seconds and then toast it. But freezing bread is just perfect because bread goes off SO quickly.

    So. Some examples of meals that I make are:

    Lentil and Cauliflower dahl - onion, garlic, ginger (buy a big root (about £3) and stick it in the fridge. It will last until it's finished), cauliflower, red lentils, veg stock, spices (Spices will literally save your life) and rice. Done. Super cheap and super easy to make. Lasts for ages and is so yummy.

    Pumpkin pasta. This makes about 6 good meals - Tin of pumpkin (sainsburys), coconut milk tin, tin tomatoes, onion, garlic, ginger, pasta.

    Stir fry. Beginning of the week - mushrooms, peppers, carrots, onions, garlic, ginger and rice - don't freeze

    Cheesey pasta - Carrots and potato boiled up. Blended with spices, water and nutritional yeast and poured over pasta. Bloody divine and filling and nutritious. Lasts about 3 meals - don't freeze.

    Tofu and rice - https://spicysouthernkitchen.com/asian-garlic-tofu/

    Bean chilli - tins of kidney beans, chickpeas, tomatoes, coconut milk, black beans, stock, onion, garlic, ginger, stock, rice

    Lentil bolognese and pasta

    What I call 'use up meals':

    Beans on toast

    Beans on jacket potato


    I spend about £20 a week on food. Sometimes more depending if I want to try something new or, more commonly, if I've run out of condiments. Everyone always says my food smells amazing and I've not poisoned anyone yet So it is very very possible to eat cheaply. It's harder to eat more expensive on a vegan diet. The main cost for me is the Tofu and Almond milk (for 1 week, I will spend about £7 on those two things alone - about 3 almond milks - usually last more than a week).


    Have fun at uni
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    For how many years are you a vegan? Its not healthy. Bacon eggs. And mashed potatoes.
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    (Original post by maxway)
    For how many years are you a vegan? Its not healthy. Bacon eggs. And mashed potatoes.
    Veganism is extremely healthy when you do it right.

    Don't troll. And don't talk rubbish about things you don't know
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    (Original post by SHUGURU)
    Veganism is extremely healthy when you do it right.
    Don't troll. And don't talk rubbish about things you don't know
    I have eaten vegetables only too. It drives health to disaster if you have heart disease. So?
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    Hey, I'm also vegan and Scottish and going to university next year (and called Caitlin!). I have the same dilemma as you about trying to go somewhere vegan-friendly and I guess at the end of the day a university in Glasgow or Edinburgh is the best option.
    As far as the cheapness of eating vegan at uni, of course I don't know, but I've heard it's very doable. There's a channel on YouTube called Cheap Lazy Vegan, she makes a lot of weekly food prep videos which are definitely suitable for students, so you should check them out. You'll have heard how students just live off pasta, noodles and rice - all of which are vegan! I love making pizza at home which is super simple and cheap to do too so that's an option also.
    I wouldn't stress about it, you can always join the university's vegetarian/vegan society (if they have one) and find help there!
 
 
 
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