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B1304 - Educational Bursaries Bill 2017 Watch

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    B1304 - Educational Bursaries Bill 2017, TSR Conservative & Unionist Party



    A

    BILL

    TO

    protect educational bursaries in law.


    BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-

    1 - Definitions
    (1) ‘Educational establishment’ shall refer to any establishment that makes active provisions for the supply of primary and/or secondary education as defined in S. 2(1) and S. 2(3) of the Education Act 1996.
    (2) ‘Unqualified teachers’ shall refer to teachers who have failed to, or has yet to, gain Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) as awarded by the National College for Teaching and Leadership.
    (3) Right to adobe, as determined in S. 2(1) of the Immigration Act 1971, shall refer to the right to reside, work and settle in the United Kingdom held by subjects who hold citizenship of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
    (4) ‘Indefinite leave to remain’ and ‘permanent residency’ shall refer to the immigration status granted to subjects, who under S. 2(1) of the Immigration Act 1971, do not qualify for right to abode in the United Kingdom but who have already been admitted to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and whose stay has no predetermined time restrictions.

    2 - Bursaries
    (1) The Department of Education shall make available a number of educational bursaries each year.
    (2) The bursaries may be in any of the following subjects:-
    (2) (1) Mathematics;
    (2) (2) Further Mathematics;
    (2) (3) Chemistry;
    (2) (4) Biology;
    (2) (5) Physics;
    (2) (6) Computer Science;
    (2) (7) Geography;
    (2) (8) History;
    (2) (9) English Language;
    (2) (10) English Literature;
    (2) (11) any Modern Foreign Language;
    (2) (12) any other subject that may be deemed in demand, as specified by the Department for Education.
    (3) These bursaries may take the form of:-
    (3) (1) monies paid into the student’s bank account;
    (3) (2) monies offset against any student loan repayments
    (3) (3) monies offset against any student’s tax liabilities
    in instalments on the 31st of November and June respectively over the course of 3 years.
    (4) The student in question may be eligible for a 'career enhancement' grant upto an additional £10,000 after 5 years of continuous service, and as long as his/her teaching is deemed to be 'good' or 'outstanding' for preceding 2 years - said grant would not be repayable.
    (5) The exact value of any bursary, which is to be determined by the Department for Education, shall take into account:-
    (5) (1) absolute demand;
    (5) (2) relative demand;
    (5) (3) degree of education;
    (5) (4) tuition fees;
    (5) (5) any other pertinent factor.

    3 - Eligibility
    (1) These bursaries shall be available to all who hold the right to reside and can demonstrate habitual residence in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
    (2) Students who have not studied in the UK may be asked to prove proficiency in the English language to qualify.
    (3) Students who do not have ‘right to adobe’, ‘indefinite leave to remain’ or equivalent, ‘permanent residency’ or equivalent, or are subject to enhanced immigration controls as assessed by the Home Office do not qualify.
    (4) Students must have:-
    (4) (1) a ‘pure’ Undergraduate degree at 2:1 or higher for that subject; that is to say the subject for which a bursary has been applied for must be the subject in which the degree was achieved;
    (4) (2) a Postgraduate degree at 2:1 or higher where the subject constituted at least 50% of the degree, or otherwise was deemed the main or major subject of study;
    (4) (3) an equivalent degree.
    (5) Students may only apply for bursaries between:-
    (5) (1) the months of April - June, for commencement on or prior to the 1st of September of that year;
    (5) (2) the months of October - December, for commencement on or prior to the 1st of March of the succeeding year;
    (6) In all circumstances, the student is obliged to consent to an enhanced and full Disclosure and Barring Service check.
    (7) Any student that fails their DBS check or refuses to consent to one shall be unable to qualify for at least 3 years, except in the circumstances that:-
    (7) (1) said DBS check returns incorrect information for which the student has legitimate and verifiable proof to contradict;
    (7) (2) a failure results from:
    (7) (2) (1) convictions whose term did not exceed 1 month;
    (7) (2) (2) convictions whose term did not exceed 3 months, where the offence was not violence, assault, substance or terror related and did not involve children in any mechanism or way;
    (8) Where a student has spent terror-related offences, belongs, or has belonged to a proscribed organisation, which shall be deemed to mean any group or organisation proscribed by Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department under section 3 of the Terrorism Act of 2000, the student shall be barred from applying for a bursary indefinitely.
    (9) Where a student is barred under S. (3)(8), the student may apply for special re-consideration directly to the Department of Education, who in unison with the Home Office, Her Majesty’s Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department, a representative from the Disclosure and Barring Service along with the Police, will evaluate whether a bursary may be offered on a case-by-case basis.

    4 - Review
    (1) Subjects on offer shall be subject to review annually by the Department for Education, under the advice of the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills:-
    (1) (1) A subject may be added with immediate effect;
    (1) (2) A subject may be removed after 6 months notice;
    (1) (3) Where a subject is removed, students who have qualified for the bursary in a subject area now not part of the bursary programme shall be unaffected; that is to say their bursary agreement with the Department for Education shall remain in place.
    (1) (4) Core defined subjects, as detailed between S. 2(2)(1) to S.2(2)(12) may not be removed by authority of the Department for Education.

    5 - Short title and extent
    (1) This Act shall come into force on the 1st of September 2018.
    (2) This Act may be cited as the Educational Bursaries Act 2017.
    (3) This Act extends to the whole of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.



    Notes
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    This entire House acknowledges the important role played by teachers across the educational system of the United Kingdom and the underlying fact that educational establishments across our great country are facing issues apropos of the recruitment and retention of staff - primarily fuelled by a lack of supply, and ever augmenting demand. Hence, this bill is proposes to protect bursaries in law - bursaries that are addressing to some extent the issue in certain subjects; this bill protects the bursaries in core subjects including but not limited to Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Computing, Geography and MFL; this bill also expands the scheme to cover all subjects 'in demand'.


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    No, the bill protects bursaries for subjects where there might not be a demand for teachers in the future, bursaries should be an exceptional offering to attract teachers when there is a shortfall, not a standard handout for becoming a teacher. And the bill uses terminology suggesting there was a lack of research, for instance, the bill lists a 2:1 in a postgraduate degree when postgraduate degrees are not ranked using the divisions undergraduate degrees use.
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    Aye. A good bill from the Shadow Education Secretary ns_2. I'm sure some issues already raised here can be addressed quite easily in an amendment.
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    3.4.1 I have an issue with. The existing rules regarding joint honours should be enforced here.

    3.4.3 is woefully vague

    4.1.4 I disagree with

    Apart from that, nice principles.
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    3.4.1 I have an issue with. The existing rules regarding joint honours should be enforced here.

    3.4.3 is woefully vague

    4.1.4 I disagree with

    Apart from that, nice principles.
    (Original post by Jacob E)
    No, the bill protects bursaries for subjects where there might not be a demand for teachers in the future, bursaries should be an exceptional offering to attract teachers when there is a shortfall, not a standard handout for becoming a teacher. And the bill uses terminology suggesting there was a lack of research, for instance, the bill lists a 2:1 in a postgraduate degree when postgraduate degrees are not ranked using the divisions undergraduate degrees use.
    I acknowledge the points made.

    In time for the second reading, I will amend the bill: the error in regards to postgraduate grading will be corrected (to merit/distinction); where joint honours have been awarded, the candidate will be able to apply to teach either subject; and 4.1.4 will be removed.

    The equivalent degree element will be appended to the Undergraduate and Postgraduate element.

    Hence, only subjects deemed to be in demand by OFSTED will be offered bursaries - this shall, as the bill details, be reviewed annually
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    (Original post by ns_2)
    I acknowledge the points made.

    In time for the second reading, I will amend the bill:

    where joint honours have been awarded, the candidate will be able to apply to teach either subject; and 4.1.4 will be removed.
    As I understand it, the present policy is that at least 50% of your degree course must be in that subject. Due to the varied nature of modern university courses and combined honours systems available, this would be the safest way of putting it.
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    (Original post by ns_2)
    Hence, only subjects deemed to be in demand by OFSTED will be offered bursaries - this shall, as the bill details, be reviewed annually
    Not one bit true at all, for instance I doubt there is demand for Swahili teachers yet the bill has the offering of a bursary for Swahili with no way to remove it short of amendment.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Not one bit true at all, for instance I doubt there is demand for Swahili teachers yet the bill has the offering of a bursary for Swahili with no way to remove it short of amendment.
    As detailed in the bill,

    Subjects on offer shall be subject to review annually by the Department for Education, under the advice of the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills

    The Department for Education and OFSTED will work together - where they can agree that a subject is in excessive demand for teachers and whereby bursaries are required, a bursary will be offered.

    Please note that this bill is not designed to change existing policy by a massive degree, rather it protects the concept of bursaries for education in law - as it is highly likely that we will require bursaries to attract the most talented into the education system rather other areas of work.
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    (Original post by ns_2)
    As detailed in the bill,

    Subjects on offer shall be subject to review annually by the Department for Education, under the advice of the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills

    The Department for Education and OFSTED will work together - where they can agree that a subject is in excessive demand for teachers and whereby bursaries are required, a bursary will be offered.

    Please note that this bill is not designed to change existing policy by a massive degree, rather it protects the concept of bursaries for education in law - as it is highly likely that we will require bursaries to attract the most talented into the education system rather other areas of work.
    (1) (4) Core defined subjects, as detailed between S. 2(2)(1) to S.2(2)(12) may not be removed by authority of the Department for Education.

    Swahili would fall under 2.11

    The wording of 2.12 runs into problems too "may be deemed necessary" covers every single subject, it is then in turn protected

    I am also sceptical that we would see a major **** to education by giving up to £10,000 after 5 years when the sort of people you want to attract will be perhaps earning that several times over more than a teacher every year, If you're trying to pull people from £50k jobs to £25k jobs offering them £10k in 5 years probably won't do much especially when you look at earnings later in the career, shifting to being a teacher most will top out with less than the alternative job early on.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    (1) (4) Core defined subjects, as detailed between S. 2(2)(1) to S.2(2)(12) may not be removed by authority of the Department for Education.

    Swahili would fall under 2.11

    The wording of 2.12 runs into problems too "may be deemed necessary" covers every single subject, it is then in turn protected

    I am also sceptical that we would see a major **** to education by giving up to £10,000 after 5 years when the sort of people you want to attract will be perhaps earning that several times over more than a teacher every year, If you're trying to pull people from £50k jobs to £25k jobs offering them £10k in 5 years probably won't do much especially when you look at earnings later in the career, shifting to being a teacher most will top out with less than the alternative job early on.
    Firstly, I have already acknowledged a flaw in 4.1.4 - this will be removed for the second reading.

    And, in regards to the delayed payment, it is less so to do with attracting people in the first instance, but rather to combat teacher retention - which is a major and significant obstacle facing the educational system - this element tries to prolong and ameliorate teacher retention using the existing scheme; the grant may be used to reinforce existing training for example.
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    (Original post by Jacob E)
    No, the bill protects bursaries for subjects where there might not be a demand for teachers in the future, bursaries should be an exceptional offering to attract teachers when there is a shortfall, not a standard handout for becoming a teacher. And the bill uses terminology suggesting there was a lack of research, for instance, the bill lists a 2:1 in a postgraduate degree when postgraduate degrees are not ranked using the divisions undergraduate degrees use.
    Hear, hear.
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    (Original post by ns_2)
    Firstly, I have already acknowledged a flaw in 4.1.4 - this will be removed for the second reading.

    And, in regards to the delayed payment, it is less so to do with attracting people in the first instance, but rather to combat teacher retention - which is a major and significant obstacle facing the educational system - this element tries to prolong and ameliorate teacher retention using the existing scheme; the grant may be used to reinforce existing training for example.
    How does it go about countering teacher retention issues, if I was going to leave after 4 years I would stick around for 1 more for the money and then bugger off that one year later. Sure I would be there one year longer, but it would be begrudgingly, not because I really want to be there and do that job which will have its own issues.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    How does it go about countering teacher retention issues, if I was going to leave after 4 years I would stick around for 1 more for the money and then bugger off that one year later. Sure I would be there one year longer, but it would be begrudgingly, not because I really want to be there and do that job which will have its own issues.
    I once again acknowledge your argument - this clause was included to improve the current situation where there is no motivation to carry on. The issue is that if we were to implement a sliding scale whereby the longer you stay the more you get, this could get way out of hand.

    Hence, the clause could be manipulated to ensure that said grant may only be used for educational career progression e.g. a more specialist or advanced degree.

    Or, removed altogether - but then we would have to include a clause to have minimum terms etc.
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    A tentative aye, although I take issue with 2(12), which I should painfully vague, and in my opinion needs more clarification, as well as 3(3), as personally I believe those with permanent residency should be allowed bursaries.
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    aye
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    (Original post by LifeIsFine)
    A tentative aye, although I take issue with 2(12), which I should painfully vague, and in my opinion needs more clarification, as well as 3(3), as personally I believe those with permanent residency should be allowed bursaries.
    It is likely that 2(12) will be removed in the second reading, with the provision of other subjects in demand to come under the review element after the first year.

    However, I do not understand your concerns with 3(3) - it prevents those without permanent residency to apply; all those with permanent residency etc are able to do so.
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    (Original post by ns_2)
    It is likely that 2(12) will be removed in the second reading, with the provision of other subjects in demand to come under the review element after the first year.

    However, I do not understand your concerns with 3(3) - it prevents those without permanent residency to apply; all those with permanent residency etc are able to do so.
    Indeed you are correct, apologies for the misreading of the bill. If the changes are made it'll be a strong aye from me in the next reading.
    Although, may I ask for more information on this 'review process', of course you don't work at the D of E but the process in itself seems unclear. I believe that if the 93 percent of student students who attend schools, the vast majority do not receive any formal teaching in economics, a subject that the basics of which are crucial in understanding our current political climate. I am not sure though, that this would be considered to be an in demand subject by the D of E, and this is a major problem.
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    (Original post by LifeIsFine)
    Indeed you are correct, apologies for the misreading of the bill. If the changes are made it'll be a strong aye from me in the next reading.
    Although, may I ask for more information on this 'review process', of course you don't work at the D of E but the process in itself seems unclear. I believe that if the 93 percent of student students who attend schools, the vast majority do not receive any formal teaching in economics, a subject that the basics of which are crucial in understanding our current political climate. I am not sure though, that this would be considered to be an in demand subject by the D of E, and this is a major problem.
    This bill is more to deal with demand for teachers in a subject, not the subject itself i.e. if 1000 Maths teachers are required for the next year, and only 200 students are enrolled in educational training (including PGCE, or the School Direct programme) - this would be a subject in demand, for the purposes of this bill.

    That being said, as you detailed yourself, if there are subjects where students ought to receive formal education like Economics and other related humanities, and the number of teachers (supply) cannot physically accommodate the augmentation of the teaching of said subject, bursaries would be offered.

    However, the augmentation of teaching of certain subjects is not covered in this bill and would have to be addressed in a bill amending the National Curriculum.
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    (Original post by ns_2)
    This bill is more to deal with demand for teachers in a subject, not the subject itself i.e. if 1000 Maths teachers are required for the next year, and only 200 students are enrolled in educational training (including PGCE, or the School Direct programme) - this would be a subject in demand, for the purposes of this bill.

    That being said, as you detailed yourself, if there are subjects where students ought to receive formal education like Economics and other related humanities, and the number of teachers (supply) cannot physically accommodate the augmentation of the teaching of said subject, bursaries would be offered.

    However, the augmentation of teaching of certain subjects is not covered in this bill and would have to be addressed in a bill amending the National Curriculum.
    Interesting, thank you for the answer.
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    Can you clarify whether this is a change, or just enshrining the existing position in primary legislation? If the former, it needs costing.
 
 
 
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