Was I being oversensitive? (Attack from student) Watch

lionheart27
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#21
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#21
(Original post by hannxm)
I've not met a low functioning autistic person, but I work with people with low functioning downs syndrome and other severe learning disabilities, to the point they're like over grown toddlers, who can be very difficult, aggressive and hit out/attack. I pointed out to OP that it's to be expected in such a role though. I've had my hands and nose crushed by one guy; he's also slapped me.

The issue is that your language suggested that you viewed all autistic people as low functioning who all attack people on a whim, when I believe it's the minority that are severely disabled by autism.
Nah I was saying that's just an occupational hazard
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Not all autistic people are automatically violent. My question was also not about whether the attack was likely to happen or not, but rather how the school/colleagues dealt with it.
I would have thought they would have intervened and used a restraint hold. I would ask not to have to work with this student or find another job where colleagues will support you.
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Anonymous #2
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The person couldn't help it, but personally I wouldn't want to work with people who may attack me at any minute - life is way too short for that. A friend of mine is a carer and he has worked with the mentally disabled; there is a culture of shifting the blame and carers are treated like utter dog excrement. There is very little support for them. Really not worth it and I'm sure your pay isn't great either.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Not all autistic people are automatically violent. My question was also not about whether the attack was likely to happen or not, but rather how the school/colleagues dealt with it.
I would have thought they would have intervened and used a restraint hold. I would ask not to have to work with this student or find another job where colleagues will support you.
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lionheart27
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(Original post by Anonymous)
The person couldn't help it, but personally I wouldn't want to work with people who may attack me at any minute - life is way too short for that. A friend of mine is a carer and he has worked with the mentally disabled; there is a culture of shifting the blame and carers are treated like utter dog excrement. There is very little support for them. Really not worth it and I'm sure your pay isn't great either.
I'm curious - what made you want to work with such people?
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hannxm
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(Original post by Muttley79)
I would have thought they would have intervened and used a restraint hold. I would ask not to have to work with this student or find another job where colleagues will support you.
Restraint holds are usually reserved for psychiatric units, not for students in a special school or in social work and they're not taught that anyway. You would likely be arrested or sued if you did do it.
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Muttley79
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#27
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(Original post by hannxm)
Restraint holds are usually reserved for psychiatric units, not for students in a special school or in social work and they're not taught that anyway. You would likely be arrested or sued if you did do it.
Sorry that is incorrect -there are techniques for restraint used in special schools - I've seen them used. Teachers have to be trained to use them - they work in pairs - and every time they are used it has to be recorded.
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ass sniff 69
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Your colleagues are savage
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hannxm
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As someone who works with severely disabled people who are challenging and potentially dangerous people, we have been told in training to never restrain someone, even just putting a belt around them or pushing them tight under a table is seen as restraint and you can be seriously punished for doing so.

I have a relative who is a teacher in a school for people with disabilities and challenging behaviour who doesn't restrain.
Even then, restraint should always be a last resort. OP got away and he didn't pose a further risk as I assume he stopped, so it would've been unnecessary to restrain.

(Original post by Muttley79)
Sorry that is incorrect -there are techniques for restraint used in special schools - I've seen them used. Teachers have to be trained to use them - they work in pairs - and every time they are used it has to be recorded.
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Anonymous #3
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This literally happens to me every day since I have an severely autistic sibling, so, yes, you are being oversensitive.

This kind of stuff is going to keep happening and you should be aware of it so that you are prepared in the future.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by hannxm)
As someone who works with severely disabled people who are challenging and potentially dangerous people, we have been told in training to never restrain someone, even just putting a belt around them or pushing them tight under a table is seen as restraint and you can be seriously punished for doing so.

I have a relative who is a teacher in a school for people with disabilities and challenging behaviour who doesn't restrain.
Even then, restraint should always be a last resort. OP got away and he didn't pose a further risk as I assume he stopped, so it would've been unnecessary to restrain.
I have friends who teach in an EBD special school they are trained in 'Team Teach' which allows restraint holds.It's not illegal at all.
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Future-Barista
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(Original post by lionheart27)
As I said in a comment earlier they laughed because they thought it was funny... **** happens and they probably didn't think it would affect her that badly
If you're working with those kind of people then yeah, it's understandable that something like that could happen and those evenys should be seen as normal in that circumstance. However it's completely out of line to laugh at someone who was attacked (albeit, not necessarily delipratly).
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hannxm
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#33
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(Original post by Muttley79)
I have friends who teach in an EBD special school they are trained in 'Team Teach' which allows restraint holds.It's not illegal at all.
A woman got arrested and given a criminal record for lifting a woman by putting her arms under the woman's armpits. It was once a legal manoeuvre but is now considered abuse, so I'm pretty sure, if I unnecessarily restrained a person, without any training, I would be prosecuted for abuse and unnecessary force. I've not long gone through this in my training. Manoeuvres and restraints are always changing and what was once taught to us is now considered abusive.
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ChickenMadness
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#34
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Nah the place you work sounds very unprofessional. Should bring it up with HR (if there is one).


[email protected] ignoring her question though.
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TimmonaPortella
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(Original post by lionheart27)
You're in the vicinity of an autist... what did you expect?
Did you even read the OP?

(Original post by Anonymous)
I am not angry at him, as I know he is autistic and that he cannot always control his actions. However, I am angry that nobody really checked I was ok. I'm a bit afraid of working with him/sitting close to him now but the school have not checked about this.

Something that annoyed me was that a group of my colleagues saw that I was walking a couple of metres away from him and were pointing and laughing; aware of what had happened.

The incident upset me even though I do not blame the student; it is the way that my colleagues handled it and I have had no training in how to deal with this kind of incident. Am I overreacting or should I mention to the school?
Nah, you're not overreacting. What exactly do you want to achieve by bringing it up though?
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