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    (Original post by Pigster)
    There are good privates and poor ones.

    Best thing I can suggest is either: come to the one I teach at or plugging aside, go and visit your potential new school and spend a day there with pupils and really quiz them and not just the one you get assigned to (they're probably going to be a star, lovely pupil trying to suggest that the place is super ace).

    Which part of the country are you in? Just region will do.
    West Midlands
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    (Original post by _princessxox)
    Year 13, it is £12,600 per term for full boarding
    wow you really are a princess
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    (Original post by xBasedChris)
    That's for full boarding, which tends to be the most expensive option. Prices for day-pupils are significantly less in the vast majority of cases.
    Day boarding for the entire year at my school is £28,350, so still a lot more than £6000 per year
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    (Original post by lisseyjj)
    despite what others have said, i truly believe private education is much better. despite the fact you can still get the same grades at a state school, teachers in private schools are quite often more chilled because they don't have to worry about teaching classes of 30+ kids. at private schools you can also develop a closer relationship with teachers which can make things like approaching them for help on a topic so much easier. class sizes are also generally much smaller. at my school, the biggest class i'm in is 18 for english and science, and the smallest is 4 for design technology. the range of subjects on offer is generally wider in privately education. there's more extracurricular opportunities, and also more specialist teachers. most private schools have great facilities too. for instance, my school has an indoor pool, gym, and dedicated dance studios along with a theatre. (seems a bit excessive, especially considering i'm an academic and have nothing to do with the theatre, but it's great if you're into that sort of thing.)
    some private schools offer much more in the way of student support. this goes for careers, subject choices and higher education as well as more approachable teachers and a great pastoral team.

    i know that some people will beg to differ from me, but this is private education from my point of view. i've been in private education for 12+ years now, so i would hope i know my way around the private education system!
    Thankyou
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    (Original post by queenmeelzx)
    Hey,
    so I am currently at a public normal school and I want to leave right now. I spoke to my brother and friends about it and they all think I should leave because things aren't getting any better here. My brother has told my mum and she said she will get an application form for the school I want to go to.

    I asked my brother if I could go to private school and I think its about £6000 a term and he said maybe and I really want to go but a question he asked me stayed in my head and it was 'What if i'm basically paying £6000 and your still unhappy? All that money is thrown away!'

    I still really want to go to private school but I wanted to know if any of you reading this think going to a private school will be the best for me? And if it's worth the £6000 my bro will be paying?

    Thanks,
    Meelz x
    AS A former private school student, personally i think yes it is worth it only if you put in the effort
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    (Original post by lisseyjj)
    despite what others have said, i truly believe private education is much better. despite the fact you can still get the same grades at a state school, teachers in private schools are quite often more chilled because they don't have to worry about teaching classes of 30+ kids. at private schools you can also develop a closer relationship with teachers which can make things like approaching them for help on a topic so much easier. class sizes are also generally much smaller. at my school, the biggest class i'm in is 18 for english and science, and the smallest is 4 for design technology. the range of subjects on offer is generally wider in privately education. there's more extracurricular opportunities, and also more specialist teachers. most private schools have great facilities too. for instance, my school has an indoor pool, gym, and dedicated dance studios along with a theatre. (seems a bit excessive, especially considering i'm an academic and have nothing to do with the theatre, but it's great if you're into that sort of thing.)
    some private schools offer much more in the way of student support. this goes for careers, subject choices and higher education as well as more approachable teachers and a great pastoral team.

    i know that some people will beg to differ from me, but this is private education from my point of view. i've been in private education for 12+ years now, so i would hope i know my way around the private education system!
    I went to a standard comp and it had all the facilities you mentioned, my class sizes were between 8-15, I played 2 sports, I got straight A*'s and 5 offers from uni's because my school supported my application. However, I do agree private schools are obviously better. So I'd only recommend private schools if you have an abundance of money, as comps have all the opportunities you need, you just have to work harder for them.
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    (Original post by NeverGrowUp)
    Don't stress about the haters above saying how its a waste of money lol . I've been to a public school and as I mentioned, I go to private school now. I used to be the ones saying private schools are a waste of money, I must admit. Despite achieving 8A*AA in a public school , I still decided to move as I didn't like the teachers and the environment. I also felt that I'd be much happier if i left, as having that pastoral support is really important especially when applying to uni. Also, I found that going to a private school, there were more people aiming for top unis and top grades so you wouldn't have people dragging you down + the teachers are experts in the uni process for writing good references into the top unis etc. In public schools, I felt that they wasted a lot of lesson times doing nothing and I just hate wasting time as I just get bored. But now, I guess since we pay for the classes, every lesson I've had was valuable and we move forward with the content at a good pace. If you can afford it then I don't see the harm, just make sure you choose the one you think is best for you and do a lot of research into them. You could also just wait until you're in GCSE + A-level years to move school to save you money, and move to another public school for now.
    My sister is saying that I should stay in my current school for GCSEs and that when those exams come round she'll contact the private school teachers she had and ask them to tutor me for the subjects im choosing. She also said that she can pay £1000 for a really intense two week course for a certain subject just straight before the exams.
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    (Original post by lisseyjj)
    despite what others have said, i truly believe private education is much better. despite the fact you can still get the same grades at a state school, teachers in private schools are quite often more chilled because they don't have to worry about teaching classes of 30+ kids. at private schools you can also develop a closer relationship with teachers which can make things like approaching them for help on a topic so much easier. class sizes are also generally much smaller. at my school, the biggest class i'm in is 18 for english and science, and the smallest is 4 for design technology. the range of subjects on offer is generally wider in privately education. there's more extracurricular opportunities, and also more specialist teachers. most private schools have great facilities too. for instance, my school has an indoor pool, gym, and dedicated dance studios along with a theatre. (seems a bit excessive, especially considering i'm an academic and have nothing to do with the theatre, but it's great if you're into that sort of thing.)
    some private schools offer much more in the way of student support. this goes for careers, subject choices and higher education as well as more approachable teachers and a great pastoral team.

    i know that some people will beg to differ from me, but this is private education from my point of view. i've been in private education for 12+ years now, so i would hope i know my way around the private education system!
    You like to chat a lot of ****
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    OP, most of the answers you get will be personal anecdotes based on a multitude of variables and individual experiences. I studied the IB at a private school which sends a lot of students to Oxbridge, KCL, Princeton & Yale for a year before moving to London, and am currently attending a state school with over 2,000 students offering Level 1 & Level 2 courses (as well as BTECs and A-Levels), and I am telling you, the teaching isn't that different. The main reason private schools do better than state schools is because they tend to attract motivated, intelligent students with parents who are engaged in their child's education and willing to pay for it. But those same motivated, intelligent students would do just as brilliantly anywhere else. It's the inherent dichotomy between posh students and their value of education and working-class/lower-middle class and their value of education that count for the differences in exam results.
    The main difference, I would say, is that private schools offer more extracurriculars - Duke of Edinburgh, work experience, Model UN & international debating - but by working hard, state school students can access them as easily.
    In the end, it's up to you. But the teaching itself, frankly isn't at all different.
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    Depends on the quality of state vs private schools in your area. If you only state options are genuinely awful schools then look at applying for a scholarship for a private school, or see if you qualify for a bursary. Grammar schools are also a really good option, they tend to be really good.

    Private schools aren't necessary to success - you can do well in state or private. It depends on how willing you are to put in the effort.
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    (Original post by Fighter365)
    You like to chat a lot of ****
    thank you, sweetheart. i try my best ❤
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    (Original post by NeverGrowUp)
    Well i guess your comp school is far from "standard" then. Most comp schools had class sizes of 28+ like the one I used to go too +limited opportunities and unsupportive teachers.
    Tbh I should have been clear 8-15 was in sixth form. GCSE's were about 15-20. However, I never found classes of 20 an issue. If I needed to know more I would just go ask a teacher questions at lunchtime, even if they weren't that supportive, they'd always give me the info I needed.
    The thing with going to a comp is to do well you have to be pro-active and think for yourself, which is more difficult. But you can make it through fine if you choose to.
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    (Original post by angelinahx)
    OP, most of the answers you get will be personal anecdotes based on a multitude of variables and individual experiences. I studied the IB at a private school which sends a lot of students to Oxbridge, KCL, Princeton & Yale for a year before moving to London, and am currently attending a state school with over 2,000 students offering Level 1 & Level 2 courses (as well as BTECs and A-Levels), and I am telling you, the teaching isn't that different. The main reason private schools do better than state schools is because they tend to attract motivated, intelligent students with parents who are engaged in their child's education and willing to pay for it. But those same motivated, intelligent students would do just as brilliantly anywhere else. It's the inherent dichotomy between posh students and their value of education and working-class/lower-middle class and their value of education that count for the differences in exam results.
    The main difference, I would say, is that private schools offer more extracurriculars - Duke of Edinburgh, work experience, Model UN & international debating - but by working hard, state school students can access them as easily.
    In the end, it's up to you. But the teaching itself, frankly isn't at all different.
    I agree with this 100%.
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    You lookin' like a easy come-up, ya bish
    A silver spoon I know you come from, ya bish
    And that's a lifestyle that we never knew
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    Private school is the ****ing best - not necessarily because of the education but because it imbues in you a sense of entitlement, articulacy and softer skills such as speaking properly, good manners and expectation of excellence from yourself and others that help you tread all over others and get ahead in life.
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    (Original post by GovernmentEarner)
    I agree with this 100%.
    I agree... to a certain extent. Please remember that there are sub-levels of how good schools are. There are private schools, but some private schools are better than others but more importantly there are some outstanding state schools and some unsatisfactory state schools. I went to an unsatisfactory state school and forget having bad teachers and resources, for some of my subjects I did not even have a teacher/ had supply teachers through the entire year. There are 'levels' to everything.

    I talked to many other people as I went through college and now university about their school experiences and it seems like I went to the worst school in the UK or something, it really is crazy. It angers me that such terrible schools exist but it's only when you go through such experiences is when you truly understand the situation.
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    No. School itself is pretty useless and a waste of time, why would you go to a private one where they would further take away your liberty.
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    (Original post by FailedMyMocks)
    No. School itself is pretty useless and a waste of time, why would you go to a private one where they would further take away your liberty.
    Nonsense. Maximising your own potential, having the luxury of immersing yourself in an environment in which your peers attach value to their education, and making lifelong networked friendships gives you freedom.
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    I go to a public boarding school, I've been here for 6 years and am currently in the upper sixth. Personally I wouldn't say it's worth it. I felt happier with the friends I met in my state school. The people really do like up to boarding school expectations and because there are less people here, there's always a lot of gossip and *****iness. If you don't like where you are, don't go to public school, stay where you are or switch to another school where you feel is a lot friendlier and know the grades are good, schools in Guildford are always amazing so give that a go. We pay £10,000 a term of school fees unless you're a scholar, have bursary or have a sibling or have a parent who went to the school (all of these take away a certain percentage of the fees). I feel like the environment I work in is too stressful. Being at school 24/7 and the work load you get is way too much for a teenager, I feel completely drained and I wouldn't recommend it. A lot of students in public boarding schools have developed depression and anxiety due to the continuous work load, it's crazy, and you're constantly there so you don't get a time out. Stay at state school, I have many friends who have better GCSE grades than me and are applying to Oxford and Cambridge, who actually look to take in more state school students than public boarding school ones as they have to work twice as hard for their grades. Trust me, you're better off where you are.
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    I'd say private all the way. I've always been at private so i might be biased but some of my friends went to the local state before moving and always thank god that they moved. The classes are smaller, quality of teaching is better and the MOST important factor... the opportunities you get are way better than state
 
 
 
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