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What do you think of the police? Watch

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    On an individual basis some of them are *******s who have got a bit delusional about their power, but in general they're an ok bunch. They have a hard job to do, and although it can be easy to criticise and pick holes, I'm sure the majority are doing their personal best.
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    I have no problem with them they do a hard job and protect the public if it wasn't for them then there would be mayhem
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    I have had...far too much conact with police in mental health crisis. So what I think is based on that: I think they are brilliant. I am biased, I wanted to be a ppolice officer from when I was about 6 until my MH prevented it. But they have been consistently kind, caring, friendly, reassuring, calm, empathetic, non-judgemental in dealing with me (far more so than MH services), and they have kept me alive.

    They have, over the years:

    - Sat and spoke aloud every word I whispered to them to the crisis team on the phone, when I was too terrified to speak
    - Sat on a pavement with me and talked to me in town when I cried my heart out not long after my mum was diagnosed with terminal cancer
    - Kept me awake having overdosed, and accompanied me to hospital in the ambulance, whilst the effects of the overdose made me extremely agitated and resistant, to the point where I was restrained to the floor, woke up covered in bruises and thumb prints, and the officer involved was also bruised. He told me a few weeks later that the last time he had seen me I was being taken to Intensive Care, with the doctors concerned I had done serious damage to my heart. He didn't judge me, he was kind to me, and he held no grudge at all. When they later asked if I would call if I needed them again, and I said no beause of how the OD had affected me previously, their response was just: 'Don't worry about that, let us deal with that.'
    - Alongside 5 or 6 members of the public, physically lifted me over bridge railings and into their car.
    - Cut a ligature off me, then held my hand as I lay on the ground waiting for an ambulance.
    - Got me to look into his eyes and breathe when I was terrified of being searched (being touched)
    - Offered to take my car keys for a night to prevent me from driving to the place I was considering ending my life
    - Sat with me for 2 hours in a station office, talking to me until ambulance arrived
    - Sat with a foot across my leg to stop me jiggling to burn calories
    - Bandaged up my arms

    They have chatted to me, they have kept me alive when I was very unwell, and they ultimately got me to a place where I don't need their help anywhere near so much. I will always have so much appreciation to them.
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    (Original post by Liv1204)
    I have had...far too much conact with police in mental health crisis. So what I think is based on that: I think they are brilliant. I am biased, I wanted to be a ppolice officer from when I was about 6 until my MH prevented it. But they have been consistently kind, caring, friendly, reassuring, calm, empathetic, non-judgemental in dealing with me (far more so than MH services), and they have kept me alive.

    They have, over the years:

    - Sat and spoke aloud every word I whispered to them to the crisis team on the phone, when I was too terrified to speak
    - Sat on a pavement with me and talked to me in town when I cried my heart out not long after my mum was diagnosed with terminal cancer
    - Kept me awake having overdosed, and accompanied me to hospital in the ambulance, whilst the effects of the overdose made me extremely agitated and resistant, to the point where I was restrained to the floor, woke up covered in bruises and thumb prints, and the officer involved was also bruised. He told me a few weeks later that the last time he had seen me I was being taken to Intensive Care, with the doctors concerned I had done serious damage to my heart. He didn't judge me, he was kind to me, and he held no grudge at all. When they later asked if I would call if I needed them again, and I said no beause of how the OD had affected me previously, their response was just: 'Don't worry about that, let us deal with that.'
    - Alongside 5 or 6 members of the public, physically lifted me over bridge railings and into their car.
    - Cut a ligature off me, then held my hand as I lay on the ground waiting for an ambulance.
    - Got me to look into his eyes and breathe when I was terrified of being searched (being touched)
    - Offered to take my car keys for a night to prevent me from driving to the place I was considering ending my life
    - Sat with me for 2 hours in a station office, talking to me until ambulance arrived
    - Sat with a foot across my leg to stop me jiggling to burn calories
    - Bandaged up my arms

    They have chatted to me, they have kept me alive when I was very unwell, and they ultimately got me to a place where I don't need their help anywhere near so much. I will always have so much appreciation to them.
    As a police officer, it's nice to hear words like this.

    We deal with so many mental health calls nowadays;literally a shift does not go by when we have cause for concern in relation to mental health.

    I'm glad that you've had good experiences - we all try our best to help, despite what the negative people say.
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    (Original post by Vixen47)
    They can be thick shits sometimes.

    Today at work I heard on our security/police radio thing that police were looking for a shoplifter - black leggings, black boots, short hair, dark skin, black handbag. That was the description. They basically described me. I have rather light skin for my race, but skill, dark compared to white people. (For the record, it wasn't me because I'd been at work all morning/early afternoon.) During my break I went shopping. I purposely left my handbag because I knew I'd get followed. I was wearing cardy/knitted Uggs and an oversized jumper. I look like a chav when I dress comfortably so I'm used to being followed by security when I'm shopping. I went into Wilkinsons and stared at rugs and paint for 40 minutes (couldn't decide if I should do my walls yellow or pink - it's a life changing decision). For most of that time local security and police were following me around the store. Dumb shits. What do they think I'm going to do - hide a ****ing rug in one pocket while the other pocket holds two 2.5l cans of paint?! My own damn phone can't fit in my flipping pocket. I even had the keys to my workplace on a bright lanyard with my name and the name of my job written on a badge pinned to the lanyard which was hanging down from my neck so that they knew that I'm not concealing my identity. I have never ever seen such stupidity in my life.

    I don't understand your criticism. Yes, the description was vague; but you matched it. Descriptions are what police / security have to go on initially unless there is further verifiable information.

    You state yourself that you were standing, staring at rugs and paint for 40 minutes. I've dealt with loads of shoplifters. Often they spend a long time in stores, aimlessly looking at things for long periods of time. Going over and over in their mind about what they are going to do. Back and forth to the same aisles. Then, they take the plunge and conceal something. Yes, it's an entirely innocent thing to do, but it can also be seen as suspicious, particularly when a shoplifter has been identified and a description passed.

    There was an outstanding shoplifter, a description passed, you were acting in a way which could be perceived as suspicious considering the circumstances, so you were watched. What's wrong with that?
 
 
 
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