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    I enjoyed astrophysics during sixth form so much so I decided to do my degree in Physics with Astrophysics. However, although my course focuses on astro, it included other stuff and I absolutely loved the geophysics we did. I was considering a geography degree before I choose astrophys and after doing a lot of research I think I want to specialise in geophysics not astro. Does anyone know if a masters in geo is still possible or whether careers in geophys are still open to me despite my astrophys route. I realise this is a very specific post so any replies are really appreciated!
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    Could you just perhaps do a generic physics degree and then do a masters in astrophysics or geophysics? That way you won’t be limiting yourself too early.
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    From what I've seen, masters in geophysics tend to just want a physics based degree. Some might even consider certain kinds of engineering as acceptable. You tend to find that postgraduate admissions are pretty flexible when it comes to a students background so I wouldn't see too much of a problem having an astro degree.
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    (Original post by qno2)
    From what I've seen, masters in geophysics tend to just want a physics based degree. Some might even consider certain kinds of engineering as acceptable. You tend to find that postgraduate admissions are pretty flexible when it comes to a students background so I wouldn't see too much of a problem having an astro degree.
    Fab thank you so much!!
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    (Original post by student32610)
    I enjoyed astrophysics during sixth form so much so I decided to do my degree in Physics with Astrophysics. However, although my course focuses on astro, it included other stuff and I absolutely loved the geophysics we did. I was considering a geography degree before I choose astrophys and after doing a lot of research I think I want to specialise in geophysics not astro. Does anyone know if a masters in geo is still possible or whether careers in geophys are still open to me despite my astrophys route. I realise this is a very specific post so any replies are really appreciated!
    I realize you've already gotten an answer, but I wonder if you've looked into astrobiology yet? That would be a neat way of merging your astro- and geophysics interests! It's a really unique up-and-coming field!
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    (Original post by Michelle Bieger)
    I realize you've already gotten an answer, but I wonder if you've looked into astrobiology yet? That would be a neat way of merging your astro- and geophysics interests! It's a really unique up-and-coming field!
    wow i've never heard of that before but it sounds perfect! Do you know much about it??
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    (Original post by student32610)
    wow i've never heard of that before but it sounds perfect! Do you know much about it??
    I looked into it a lot last year (the third year of my physics degree)! I currently do a general physics degree, but the astrophysics department at UH has been amazing and I've done summer research projects with various lecturers over the past two years so I've been able to move more into astrobiology! They also hold seminars every week, which is where I was able to learn more about the field.

    Astrobiology is really neat because it's super representative of how research is done nowadays--you won't find a degree called "astrobiology," because it consists of Institutes or similar organizations, that are groups of researchers that have various specializations all pooling together to investigate the various topics that exist under the heading of astrobiology.

    I see it as having three kinds of branches: investigating the Earth/terrestial things to extrapolate how life could happen on other planets, investigating other planets to determine it's biology/structure/etc, and determining the effects of space on people.

    It's very new and upcoming, so it's hard to get a grasp on it in that kind of sense. The US (primarily NASA), the UK (the biggest/flashiest is Edinburgh I think, although you will find pockets of astrobiology all over, like UH!), and Sweden seem to be the biggest countries in terms of showcasing programs and institutes with astrobiology in the title.

    For more information, try signing up to the NASA Astrobiology newsletter (the bottom of this page), check out the NASA Astrobiology Institute and this podcast episode of Ask an Astrobiologist, which showcases Dr. Alexis Templeton who is a geomicrobiologist (I think the most current episode features a geologist as well).

    This is a bit an odd suggestion as well but--if you're on twitter, the astrobiology community is really quite big on there. If you find a scientist that you particularly admire or have questions for, make sure to tweet them--they're usually pretty excited to speak to the public! If you need any help finding some scientists to start following, let me know!

    I hope this helps
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    (Original post by Michelle Bieger)
    I looked into it a lot last year (the third year of my physics degree)! I currently do a general physics degree, but the astrophysics department at UH has been amazing and I've done summer research projects with various lecturers over the past two years so I've been able to move more into astrobiology! They also hold seminars every week, which is where I was able to learn more about the field.

    Astrobiology is really neat because it's super representative of how research is done nowadays--you won't find a degree called "astrobiology," because it consists of Institutes or similar organizations, that are groups of researchers that have various specializations all pooling together to investigate the various topics that exist under the heading of astrobiology.

    I see it as having three kinds of branches: investigating the Earth/terrestial things to extrapolate how life could happen on other planets, investigating other planets to determine it's biology/structure/etc, and determining the effects of space on people.

    It's very new and upcoming, so it's hard to get a grasp on it in that kind of sense. The US (primarily NASA), the UK (the biggest/flashiest is Edinburgh I think, although you will find pockets of astrobiology all over, like UH!), and Sweden seem to be the biggest countries in terms of showcasing programs and institutes with astrobiology in the title.

    For more information, try signing up to the NASA Astrobiology newsletter (the bottom of this page), check out the NASA Astrobiology Institute and this podcast episode of Ask an Astrobiologist, which showcases Dr. Alexis Templeton who is a geomicrobiologist (I think the most current episode features a geologist as well).

    This is a bit an odd suggestion as well but--if you're on twitter, the astrobiology community is really quite big on there. If you find a scientist that you particularly admire or have questions for, make sure to tweet them--they're usually pretty excited to speak to the public! If you need any help finding some scientists to start following, let me know!

    I hope this helps
    This is honestly so amazing!!! Sounds so interesting and really cutting edge which excites me. Thank you so much for all ur help and detail!! I am definitely now gona start considering this!!
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    (Original post by student32610)
    This is honestly so amazing!!! Sounds so interesting and really cutting edge which excites me. Thank you so much for all ur help and detail!! I am definitely now gona start considering this!!
    No worries! If you have any more questions let me know and good luck!
 
 
 
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