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Most women who were once patients in a mental hospital can be trusted as babysitters Watch

  • View Poll Results: Most women who were once patients in a mental hospital can be trusted as babysitters
    Agree
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    Disagree
    18
    36.00%
    Unsure
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    14.00%

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    (Original post by Good bloke)

    It is interesting how many people say they would be ultra-cautious with their children but in practice will certainly end up leaving their children in the care of people whose previous mental health history they will have no idea about. Every parent leaves their child in the care, at some stage, of a neighbour, a relative, a parent of another child at the same school or sports club, a teacher, a sports coach, a childcare assistant, a nurse, a doctor, about whom they have no idea and make no enquiry.
    Or just leave them behind in a pub...

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    people would be loth to put their child at any risk, however theoretical.
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    I see no reason not to trust them. Unless of course they said they'd harmed someone.
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    I mean, if the doctors believe them to be stable enough to be discharged then I don't see a reason to not trust the children would be safe with them, and that's even assuming a level of danger in the first place.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Of course. But the question deals specifically with hospitalisation for reasons of mental health. If you have other, unconnected, reasons for not trusting someone then that is a separate matter not covered by the question.

    For instance, I would not trust any five-year old, in any state of mental or physical health, to babysit a child, and I might not trust a person who has received treatment for a mental health problem if I believed they were untrustworthy. But the question doesn't ask that. It essentially asks whether you would discount such a person for the sole reason of prior hospitalisation for a mental health problem. I wouldn't.

    It is interesting how many people say they would be ultra-cautious with their children but in practice will certainly end up leaving their children in the care of people whose previous mental health history they will have no idea about. Every parent leaves their child in the care, at some stage, of a neighbour, a relative, a parent of another child at the same school or sports club, a teacher, a sports coach, a childcare assistant, a nurse, a doctor, about whom they have no idea and make no enquiry.
    ye, school is something you don't have much control over as a parent though, and you would expect most schools have strict guidelines for who they employ. Unless you have the time to homeschool your kids.

    Generally if I discovered a person was violent in the past, murderer or anything like that I wouldn't trust them. If it was due to mental illness and they were supposedly now reformed it wouldn't make a difference to me. Better safe than sorry.

    If they're a mental health patient and they have no violent past or anything then I see no reason to vilify them.
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    Absolutely, with obvious caveats:

    - If they had homicidal thoughts (very rare anyway)
    - If they were not well enough at the time (bearing in mind people can be very unwell without being in hospital too)
    - If I knew them well enough (clearly, because I wouldn't be leaving my children with anyone I didn't know or trust).

    I spent 5 months in an EDU, and 3 weeks in an Acute ward on another occasion, and am absolutely capable of looking after a child: I was struggling severely with anorexia, and with suicidal thoughts on the latter occasion, but it doesn't (didn't) make me a risk to anybody else. I'm an absolutely 'regular' human being. I would trust the majority of those I met on the EDU to look after my future children (if I saw them regularly, which I don't), and those that had children were wonderful and very loving mothers, just unwell at the time.
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    Generally if I discovered a person was violent in the past, murderer or anything like that I wouldn't trust them. If it was due to mental illness and they were supposedly now reformed it wouldn't make a difference to me. Better safe than sorry.
    The question does specify "most women", I don't have the exact figures (and I'm at work so not about to fill my work computer with googling for them) but most people in psychiatric hospitals are not there because they've murdered someone, I doubt most are even there because of being a danger to others. Many will be voluntary patients rather than being on a section so not really murderers. :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Mancini)
    To me whether you are a voluntary patient or not doesn't matter.
    There's a pretty big difference. One realizes they are ill and need help, the other may not and doesn't want to engage in treatment. Often when people get off section they stop their medication and relapse. Given that fact, I would say it makes a big difference whether a woman was on a section or not to whether she may be later an appropriate baby sitter. That said, people who were sectioned can recover too but I would still say it's an important difference to note.

    (Original post by Mancini)
    I however, can't judge for example a person voluntarily looking for CBT therapy for depression to a more dangerous mental patient but it would still raise alarm bells.
    To link back to your previous point, a person with depression may voluntarily admit herself to hospital to try out a new medication in a safe environment. That's not much different to voluntarily looking for CBT and is very different to, to use your words, a "more dangerous mental patient".

    (Original post by Mancini)
    I am not sure how this question came about , I wouldn't think most employers would have a positive outlook on mental health issues. I can't blame a parent for not wanting to employ someone potentially dangerous either.
    No, employers generally don't have a positive outlook on mental health: http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41740666

    But I don't see how their discriminatory attitude is relevant here. I know a fair few people who have been in psychiatric hospitals, several of whom hold down jobs or are at university and some who have recovered completely. The question says "most" not all and tbh I think you're quite misinformed about the kind of people who end up in psychiatric hospitals.

    (Original post by Mancini)
    I don't even think this is a realistic proposition and to be honest I wouldn't want to deal with people with such issues, it's really stressful and just by observing peoples behaviour you can tell when someone is not all there.
    You wouldn't want to deal with someone with mental issues? You do realize 1 in 4 people experience them in their life? That last sentence? Dude. really? :facepalm:
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    Agree or disagree?

    Simple question. Please vote in the poll before reading the spoiler.

    It would be interesting if you could explain your answer in the thread and whether you'd let a woman who had been in a psychiatric hospital watch your [future] kids.
    I don't think this is a simple question at all. Psychiatric hospitals accommodate people with a wide spectrum of problems.

    Would I trust my (future) children with someone who had attempted suicide in the past? Probably. Would I trust my (future) children with someone with a history of bpd (etc) who had stopped taking medication? Given my previous interactions with people in such circumstances, no I would not.

    I'd need to know the person first, to some extent, before I'd trust them. I don't think them being in a psychiatric hospital at some point would change that. It seems like this is being set up to shame (edit: to portray that) people who would discriminate against those with a history of mental health issues, given that many people have experienced mental health issues at some point and most with mental health issues are not a threat to others. Apologies if not, it just seems like we're being asked a complex hypothetical question based on a single piece of information.
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    I'm going to have to disagree cuz it depends on the illness and the person. Like is she a responsible person who takes her medicines daily or has a good support system. I would;t say though just cuz someone was once in their lives in a mental hospital they are incapable of being trusted ever. If I had kids, it would be determine on her progress and how responsible she would be concerning her mental health like taking medicine and having a therapist/psychologist. I think those with mental illnesses should have at least be given a chance. Also there are babysitters who abuse children who don't have mental illnesses.
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    Completely depends what they were in there for.
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    (Original post by pjm600)
    I don't think this is a simple question at all. Psychiatric hospitals accommodate people with a wide spectrum of problems.

    Would I trust my (future) children with someone who had attempted suicide in the past? Probably. Would I trust my (future) children with someone with a history of bpd (etc) who had stopped taking medication? Given my previous interactions with people in such circumstances, no I would not.

    I'd need to know the person first, to some extent, before I'd trust them. I don't think them being in a psychiatric hospital at some point would change that. It seems like this is being set up to shame (edit: to portray that) people who would discriminate against those with a history of mental health issues, given that many people have experienced mental health issues at some point and most with mental health issues are not a threat to others. Apologies if not, it just seems like we're being asked a complex hypothetical question based on a single piece of information.
    Hit the nail on the head.

    The question is far too simplistic and ignores a lot of important questions, which is why I never chose a poll option. I don't think I can give an informed opinion, without more information.
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    It depends really. If you know the person, or you know what they were in the hospital for, then it might not be any concern at all. But in the absence of those things it might go the other way. You want to know that the person you're trusting your kids' care to is stable, and if there's any doubt about that then I can see parents choosing not to hire that person.
 
 
 
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