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    Turning 18 next week I'm wondering whether to start learning to drive. It's not ideal timing with currently doing A levels and planning to go to uni next year as I'm not sure how long it would take to pass my test. I have also looked into the week long intense driving schools as an option but I am aware these are expensive. Getting my license isn't urgent as I don't plan on buying a car but I'd like to have it sorted before uni. Do you think it's worth starting now or after uni when I'd actually need a car? Thanks for any reponses
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    I think it's worth it. Apparently, easier to grasp the younger one is.
    And once you pass, the license remains. Not too sure but insurance may somehow work out cheaper this way.

    Upto you really, if you think you cnm handle it or not.
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    (Original post by bencoup14)
    Turning 18 next week I'm wondering whether to start learning to drive. It's not ideal timing with currently doing A levels and planning to go to uni next year as I'm not sure how long it would take to pass my test. I have also looked into the week long intense driving schools as an option but I am aware these are expensive. Getting my license isn't urgent as I don't plan on buying a car but I'd like to have it sorted before uni. Do you think it's worth starting now or after uni when I'd actually need a car? Thanks for any reponses
    Hi there! :wavey:

    This thread should be in the Learning to drive forum. I'll just tag AngryJellyfish to get this moved over there
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    (Original post by starfab)
    I think it's worth it. Apparently, easier to grasp the younger one is.
    And once you pass, the license remains. Not too sure but insurance may somehow work out cheaper this way.

    Upto you really, if you think you cnm handle it or not.
    Thanks, not sure how good I'd be behind the wheel but hopefully I could get it done before June when exams begin
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    (Original post by RoyalSheepy)
    Hi there! :wavey:

    This thread should be in the Learning to drive forum. I'll just tag AngryJellyfish to get this moved over there
    Oh I didn't realise, thanks!!
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    The biggest advantage of learning to drive a fair amount of time before you're likely to be getting your own car is that it reduces your insurance as the insurers think you've been driving for a few years which reduces your premiums (even if you haven't driven at all in that time)
    Another advantage for many people at this age, although I'm not sure if this would be the case for you, is that your parents may pay for / contribute to lessons whereas they are less likely to if you start learning after uni.
    Personally I'd say if possible then it's worth learning before you go off to uni, but obviously it's ultimately up to you!
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    (Original post by bencoup14)
    Turning 18 next week I'm wondering whether to start learning to drive. It's not ideal timing with currently doing A levels and planning to go to uni next year as I'm not sure how long it would take to pass my test. I have also looked into the week long intense driving schools as an option but I am aware these are expensive. Getting my license isn't urgent as I don't plan on buying a car but I'd like to have it sorted before uni. Do you think it's worth starting now or after uni when I'd actually need a car? Thanks for any reponses
    Definitely worth it.

    I started learning to drive on and off last August (which was the start of Y13 for me) and continued my lessons even through my A-Level exams. It can definitely be done.

    I don't have a car (yet) but knowing that you can legally drive one really reduces the pressure and probably means fewer headaches in the future, especially when applying for jobs that require you to have a licence.
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    (Original post by Lemur14)
    The biggest advantage of learning to drive a fair amount of time before you're likely to be getting your own car is that it reduces your insurance as the insurers think you've been driving for a few years which reduces your premiums (even if you haven't driven at all in that time)
    Unfortunately this just isn’t true.. what you are referring to is a no claims bonus, which reduces your insurance premium. However, to build a no claims bonus one has to have insurance, so the idea that you can get your license and wait 10 years to drive on cheaper insurance is nonsense.
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    I did the same. I started learning to drive 7 months after I turned 17, passed my test in January this year. I've started uni this year and haven't got a car. I wanted to learn so I have that skill. I want to be able to have a clean license for several years before I actually get a car. I have driven my dad's car a little bit, but not that much. I just wanted to get it out the way. It's also nice to have that ID and not have to carry my passport around.
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    (Original post by magnus5485)
    Unfortunately this just isn’t true.. what you are referring to is a no claims bonus, which reduces your insurance premium. However, to build a no claims bonus one has to have insurance, so the idea that you can get your license and wait 10 years to drive on cheaper insurance is nonsense.
    I probably didn't explain it very well but I am pretty sure it is true since I have older friends who have done so and it does reduce their insurance.
    What I was trying to say (hopefully I will explain it better this time) was that as someone who has just learnt to drive then being the main driver on a car puts you in the much higher risk zone for insurers which would increase your premiums. However, if say you got your first car at 26 having learnt to drive at 18 then it would seem as if you had 8 years driving experience and so are likely to be safer, hence usually you would fall into a lower risk category which would reduce your premiums.
    If I'm still wrong blame my friends feel free to ignore me

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