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Chemical engineering foundation course Watch

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    Hi, I'm thinking of doing the foundation course at nottingham for chem eng as i didnt do physics or chem, just maths(which I got an A in alevels). But I have heard like 80 % of the degree is basically physics :0. Now I haven't done physics since gcse and what if bu doing this foundation course that I actually start to find it hard? I really don't know what to do as I have already taken a gap year and now I am applying for this foundation course but what if it's not for me? Is chem eng interesting and if si which modules and why? Do you know anyone who have done foundation courses and done well through their degree?
    Thanks in advance
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    I'm applying for chemical engineering normal.. So If I can offer any help, just ask

    I have to say Chem Eng defo's requires more chemistry than physics though.
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    (Original post by Texxers)
    I'm applying for chemical engineering normal.. So If I can offer any help, just ask

    I have to say Chem Eng defo's requires more chemistry than physics though.
    Hi thanks for replying. Really? I have heard on threads how theres sonmuch mathsand physics in a chem eng degree? What kind of chem is involved and what kind of maths would be involved in the chem eng degree?
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    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    Hi thanks for replying. Really? I have heard on threads how theres sonmuch mathsand physics in a chem eng degree? What kind of chem is involved and what kind of maths would be involved in the chem eng degree?
    From reading course outlines, and asking people. The maths involved is mainly integration, differentiation and using formulas. The chemistry involved is thermodynamics, kinetics and particle behaviour. Also the storage and chemical properties of chemicals. The physics involved is all the molecular stuff as well as a bit of mechanics.
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    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    Hi, I'm thinking of doing the foundation course at nottingham for chem eng as i didnt do physics or chem, just maths(which I got an A in alevels). But I have heard like 80 % of the degree is basically physics :0. Now I haven't done physics since gcse and what if bu doing this foundation course that I actually start to find it hard? I really don't know what to do as I have already taken a gap year and now I am applying for this foundation course but what if it's not for me? Is chem eng interesting and if si which modules and why? Do you know anyone who have done foundation courses and done well through their degree?
    Thanks in advance
    Foundation courses are designed for people without the necessary subjects to complete the degree. An A in maths suggests you are capable of learning the required physics, as the physics is mainly applied maths. I wouldn't worry if you're prepared to work at it.
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    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    Hi, I'm thinking of doing the foundation course at nottingham for chem eng as i didnt do physics or chem, just maths(which I got an A in alevels). But I have heard like 80 % of the degree is basically physics :0. Now I haven't done physics since gcse and what if bu doing this foundation course that I actually start to find it hard? I really don't know what to do as I have already taken a gap year and now I am applying for this foundation course but what if it's not for me? Is chem eng interesting and if si which modules and why? Do you know anyone who have done foundation courses and done well through their degree?
    Thanks in advance
    If you haven't done physics or chemistry it really won't be easy. Understanding mathematics is one thing but engineering is very applied physics heavy. Which universities have you applied to?

    I would recommend the foundation year just to give you a more solid base, yes it's an extra year but it will likely be more beneficial for you.
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    (Original post by trapking)
    If you haven't done physics or chemistry it really won't be easy. Understanding mathematics is one thing but engineering is very applied physics heavy. Which universities have you applied to?

    I would recommend the foundation year just to give you a more solid base, yes it's an extra year but it will likely be more beneficial for you.
    I want to go Birmingham or either notts to do the foundation course and then proceed to the normal beng coursewith industrial year. It just scares me because even though i liked maths at alevel because it was applied, I had to work really hard and had a very good tutor- are engineers or those who do these subjects just naturally talented ?
    I also have not done physics since gcse and what if by doing the foundation course I come to realise I hate physics :/.
    A girl from Loughborough said at least 80% course is physics
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    (Original post by Texxers)
    From reading course outlines, and asking people. The maths involved is mainly integration, differentiation and using formulas. The chemistry involved is thermodynamics, kinetics and particle behaviour. Also the storage and chemical properties of chemicals. The physics involved is all the molecular stuff as well as a bit of mechanics.
    And are things like thermodynamics, kinetics and particle interesting? What I mean is do students at a level generally like these topics
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    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    And are things like thermodynamics, kinetics and particle interesting? What I mean is do students at a level generally like these topics
    I have no idea about other students, but I love them lol.
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    (Original post by Texxers)
    I have no idea about other students, but I love them lol.
    What are they about or could you give some insight to these through a recommended book list?
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    (Original post by Texxers)
    I have no idea about other students, but I love them lol.
    And where r u applying
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    (Original post by Texxers)
    From reading course outlines, and asking people. The maths involved is mainly integration, differentiation and using formulas. The chemistry involved is thermodynamics, kinetics and particle behaviour. Also the storage and chemical properties of chemicals. The physics involved is all the molecular stuff as well as a bit of mechanics.
    Thermodynamics and particle behaviour (depending on what you mean by particle behaviour anyway) are both physics topics
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    Thermodynamics and particle behaviour (depending on what you mean by particle behaviour anyway) are both physics topics
    Could you recommend any books to get a better insight to this?
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    Would you say engineering is basically a maths degree?
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    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    Would you say engineering is basically a maths degree?
    Much of the content is essentially applied maths - probably around three quarters of it, give or take depending on the university. You'll also do some stuff like CAD and other engineering software, labs, workshops, and group project work to make up the rest.
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    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    Would you say engineering is basically a maths degree?
    They couldnt be anymore different
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Much of the content is essentially applied maths - probably around three quarters of it, give or take depending on the university. You'll also do some stuff like CAD and other engineering software, labs, workshops, and group project work to make up the rest.
    Hi thanks for replying,
    So there aren't any proofs and theorems we need to know right? What is CAD?
    Have you done chem eng?
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    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    Could you recommend any books to get a better insight to this?
    No idea Im afraid, the only textbooks I could reccomend would look at the topics from a pure physics perspective rather than from the perspective that is applied to chem eng stuff
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    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    And where r u applying
    Surrey
    Loughborough
    Aston
    Lancaster
    Greenwich
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    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    So there aren't any proofs and theorems we need to know right?
    Not from a mathematical perspective, no - for example, you won't have to prove calculus. You will probably be expected to derive some equations from first principles, though, although the amount will depend on the university, as some like this approach more than others.

    What is CAD?
    CAD is Computer Aided Design. It's basically using a software package to design something and produce the drawings. At university this isn't typically covered in much detail as part of the modules, but you might have to use it more for individual or group projects, depending on what you do them on, and it could be quite important for after university too.

    The main software packages they cover at university are usually modelling and analysis packages; for example, using CFD (computational fluid dynamics) software to model something as part of a fluids module.

    Have you done chem eng?
    No, I did mech eng, but engineering degrees follow the same format, just the modules and material changes to suit the discipline where required. There is plenty of overlap between the disciplines, and you'll quite likely share a few modules too.
 
 
 
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