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    (Original post by Smack)
    Not from a mathematical perspective, no - for example, you won't have to prove calculus. You will probably be expected to derive some equations from first principles, though, although the amount will depend on the university, as some like this approach more than others.



    CAD is Computer Aided Design. It's basically using a software package to design something and produce the drawings. At university this isn't typically covered in much detail as part of the modules, but you might have to use it more for individual or group projects, depending on what you do them on, and it could be quite important for after university too.

    The main software packages they cover at university are usually modelling and analysis packages; for example, using CFD (computational fluid dynamics) software to model something as part of a fluids module.



    No, I did mech eng, but engineering degrees follow the same format, just the modules and material changes to suit the discipline where required. There is plenty of overlap between the disciplines, and you'll quite likely share a few modules too.
    Is there more physics on mech eng than chem eng? Did you find doing maths alevel(if you did) helped more than doing Physics A-level?
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    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    Is there more physics on mech eng than chem eng?
    It's hard to say, because once I started studying engineering, I never thought of things in terms of what was maths and what was physics and what was something else (well, except for the maths modules, which taught the maths content necessary to then study the engineering content, which were clearly maths); it all just became "engineering".

    Did you find doing maths alevel(if you did) helped more than doing Physics A-level?
    I did Scottish highers, but yes, I think that maths was more useful because it was more mathematical than physics. What I mean by that, is that physics at the pre-university level is designed so that you don't need an understanding of advanced maths principles such as calculus to complete the course.

    However, at university, they do use these advanced maths principles in the teaching of the material, e.g. velocity is dx/dt, rather than just something you sub into SUVAT. Hence why I think that people with good grades in maths, like yourself, stand in good stead to pick up the physics principles.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    It's hard to say, because once I started studying engineering, I never thought of things in terms of what was maths and what was physics and what was something else (well, except for the maths modules, which taught the maths content necessary to then study the engineering content, which were clearly maths); it all just became "engineering".



    I did Scottish highers, but yes, I think that maths was more useful because it was more mathematical than physics. What I mean by that, is that physics at the pre-university level is designed so that you don't need an understanding of advanced maths principles such as calculus to complete the course.

    However, at university, they do use these advanced maths principles in the teaching of the material, e.g. velocity is dx/dt, rather than just something you sub into SUVAT. Hence why I think that people with good grades in maths, like yourself, stand in good stead to pick up the physics principles.
    Where did you do it if you don't mind me asking?
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Much of the content is essentially applied maths - probably around three quarters of it, give or take depending on the university. You'll also do some stuff like CAD and other engineering software, labs, workshops, and group project work to make up the rest.
    Second year here and this is pretty accurate
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    (Original post by CHEN20041)
    Second year here and this is pretty accurate
    Hi so do you agree there is less physics and more maths?
    Where do you do chem eng if you don't mind me asking. Sorry I just have to make a decision really soon and want to speak to range of people to confirm what I want to do!
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    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    Where did you do it if you don't mind me asking?
    RGU in Aberdeen.
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    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    Hi so do you agree there is less physics and more maths?
    Where do you do chem eng if you don't mind me asking. Sorry I just have to make a decision really soon and want to speak to range of people to confirm what I want to do!
    Yes since you use maths in all modules and there are only two modules which are "physics" in first year they were fluid/heat transfer modules.

    I study at UoM.
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    (Original post by CHEN20041)
    Yes since you use maths in all modules and there are only two modules which are "physics" in first year they were fluid/heat transfer modules.

    I study at UoM.
    Hi, how big is the jump from A-level maths to maths in chem eng? Can you balance work and societies?
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    (Original post by CHEN20041)
    Yes since you use maths in all modules and there are only two modules which are "physics" in first year they were fluid/heat transfer modules.

    I study at UoM.
    Also is there more maths than chemistry? Is there a lot of chem or not really?
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    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    Hi, how big is the jump from A-level maths to maths in chem eng? Can you balance work and societies?
    For first yeat the jump between A-level maths and the maths in first year is very small, you basically do a maths module in first semester which is just all A-level maths and then second semester you do maths which is like furhter maths at A-level.

    (Original post by Bluebell1234)
    Also is there more maths than chemistry? Is there a lot of chem or not really?
    There is more maths because you use maths in all the modules in some way or another.

    There is a fair bit of chemistry
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    (Original post by Texxers)

    I have to say Chem Eng defo's requires more chemistry than physics though.
    This is completely false. Chem eng is mostly maths and physics, there's not much chemistry at all. That is why lots of unis require maths and physics but don't insist on chemistry at a level.
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    (Original post by Student-95)
    This is completely false. Chem eng is mostly maths and physics, there's not much chemistry at all. That is why lots of unis require maths and physics but don't insist on chemistry at a level.
    LOOOOOL, what kind of logic is that? Read any course outline and you'll see the majority of it is chemistry. Every course I see requires maths and chemistry.
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    (Original post by Texxers)
    LOOOOOL, what kind of logic is that? Read any course outline and you'll see the majority of it is chemistry. Every course I see requires maths and chemistry.
    Lol I don't need to read course outlines I'm in my final year at Surrey. There is barely any chemistry and lots of physics. Considering its a vocational degree and most courses are accredited, it will be the same for all of them.
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    (Original post by Student-95)
    Lol I don't need to read course outlines I'm in my final year at Surrey. There is barely any chemistry and lots of physics. Considering its a vocational degree and most courses are accredited, it will be the same for all of them.
    Uhhhh wait what lol? There is hardly any chemistry??

    What sort of physics then, mechanics?
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    (Original post by Texxers)
    LOOOOOL, what kind of logic is that? Read any course outline and you'll see the majority of it is chemistry. Every course I see requires maths and chemistry.
    If you want to do Chemistry do BSc Chemistry. Chemical Engineering is mostly about engineering, not chemistry.

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    Hey at the moment I am doing a BTEC extended diploma in engineering and applying for the foundation year. I feel as if I will drown in the applied maths because i am doing a BTEC, However I get quite excited about pilot plants and I think chemistry is very cool. Will the lectures at Sheffield just throw the work at me and walk off?
 
 
 
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