Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I graduated in 2015 with a first class degree in physics (BSc). I published work in a journal as part of my final year project, called physica status solidi. I entered university as a mature student and I am now 29. I also have a few "As" at A level but they were a long time ago now.

    Over the past two years I have been rejected from almost everything I have applied for and have only worked as a temporary exam marker over the summer. I have never earnt above minimum wage. In May 2017 I was rejected at the final stage from the NHS scientist training programme in medical physics and just recently I was rejected from an entry level graduate job as an acoustics engineer. I have been rejected from minimum wage lab technician roles as well as every other graduate scheme I ever applied for.

    I am totally lost at this point and don't know what to do. Currently I am enrolled on an MSc in nuclear science and technology at the University of Manchester, but I am thinking of withdrawing as I am tired of studying with no job in sight and it may not lead to a job. Despite there being a resurgance in nuclear power in the UK I would probably still lack experience and be rejected by the graduate scheme employers. My course is hard, I'm jaded and don't have a lot of work experience. My MSc is free (no tuition fees due to my grades). Would I be a fool to withdraw?

    There was someone who dropped out after the first year on my undergraduate course. She instead chose to do a software apprenticeshp with the DWP and now works as a java developer, which is a good job.I looked at the apprenticeship myself and can't do it, as it is a "level 4" course whereas my degree is "level 6". In reality, the national framework for qualifications is meaningless as her apprenticeship is worth far more than my degree. My degree is worth no more than toilet paper, as has proven to be the case. It's a shame as I enjoyed physics.

    I have a few years of volunteer work on my CV in addition to office work. I don't have any internships but I do have good references. I present myself well but I am not getting anywhere. I was liked at my previous jobs and was always polite and got work done.To be honest, I wish I had never gone to university, or at least done something employable like medicine. I applied to graduate medicine this cycle but I will probably get rejected from that as well. I am not down on myself here, I'm just being realistic.

    There are a few people from my undergradute course who have jobs. One did a PGCE and is a primary teacher and another works in an engineering company. I contacted the engineering company myself with my CV and never received a reply. I feel like employers just don't want to know me. My undergraduate university is lower down the league tablets (I want to mainain ambiguity) but I don't believe university "prestige" is the reason for my lack of success. I don't have any connections, relevant experience (for anything) and I don't know what options are open to me.

    Is it possible for me to get on a software apprenticeship?

    Should I continue with my masters, or look at other postgrad opportunities?

    Should I give up applying to graduate schemes?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Just a thought, have you looked at MoD positions in aerospace and aviation? Lots of science and physics related roles there.
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by phygrad15)
    I graduated in 2015 with a first class degree in physics (BSc). I published work in a journal as part of my final year project, called physica status solidi. I entered university as a mature student and I am now 29. I also have a few "As" at A level but they were a long time ago now.

    Over the past two years I have been rejected from almost everything I have applied for and have only worked as a temporary exam marker over the summer. I have never earnt above minimum wage. In May 2017 I was rejected at the final stage from the NHS scientist training programme in medical physics and just recently I was rejected from an entry level graduate job as an acoustics engineer. I have been rejected from minimum wage lab technician roles as well as every other graduate scheme I ever applied for.

    I am totally lost at this point and don't know what to do. Currently I am enrolled on an MSc in nuclear science and technology at the University of Manchester, but I am thinking of withdrawing as I am tired of studying with no job in sight and it may not lead to a job. Despite there being a resurgance in nuclear power in the UK I would probably still lack experience and be rejected by the graduate scheme employers. My course is hard, I'm jaded and don't have a lot of work experience. My MSc is free (no tuition fees due to my grades). Would I be a fool to withdraw?

    There was someone who dropped out after the first year on my undergraduate course. She instead chose to do a software apprenticeshp with the DWP and now works as a java developer, which is a good job.I looked at the apprenticeship myself and can't do it, as it is a "level 4" course whereas my degree is "level 6". In reality, the national framework for qualifications is meaningless as her apprenticeship is worth far more than my degree. My degree is worth no more than toilet paper, as has proven to be the case. It's a shame as I enjoyed physics.

    I have a few years of volunteer work on my CV in addition to office work. I don't have any internships but I do have good references. I present myself well but I am not getting anywhere. I was liked at my previous jobs and was always polite and got work done.To be honest, I wish I had never gone to university, or at least done something employable like medicine. I applied to graduate medicine this cycle but I will probably get rejected from that as well. I am not down on myself here, I'm just being realistic.

    There are a few people from my undergradute course who have jobs. One did a PGCE and is a primary teacher and another works in an engineering company. I contacted the engineering company myself with my CV and never received a reply. I feel like employers just don't want to know me. My undergraduate university is lower down the league tablets (I want to mainain ambiguity) but I don't believe university "prestige" is the reason for my lack of success. I don't have any connections, relevant experience (for anything) and I don't know what options are open to me.

    Is it possible for me to get on a software apprenticeship?

    Should I continue with my masters, or look at other postgrad opportunities?

    Should I give up applying to graduate schemes?
    First off what do you want to do? You say you are considering a software dev apprenticeship, that youve applied for graduate entry medicine, you're doing a course that I assume is designed for you to enter the nuclear industry and you did apply for the stp program with the nhs. It is pointless going for a scatter gun approach, you should build up the skills required for the sector you want to work in

    ie

    Medicine - gain relevant work experience (essential for getting onto the course), you cant just do medicine because it is a employable degree, you really have to want to be a doctor

    Software dev - no idea if you can apply for the apprenticeships (no harm in trying) but you can teach yourself how to code in your spare time, building up a portfilo to demonstrate your skills and can also apply for software development grad schemes when you know some programming

    But until you have your eyes set on what industry you want to aim to enter it will be very difficult to recommend to you what to do as skills take time to build and building more than a few at a time would take ages while working/studying
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    Since you're not doing anything at the moment, I think you should continue with your Masters since it's free. It will make your CV standout and make you more employable. Continue applying for graduate scheme jobs, don't give up, but also apply for non-graduate jobs for the sake of getting some income in and work at the job until something better comes along.

    Have you thought about becoming a university lecturer or researcher in Physics?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I truly empathise and can see you’re caught between a rock and a hard place. If you go on with the Masters, you stand the chance of increasing your educational experience but likewise you narrow your job prospects even more, as you’re likely to be overqualified for most posts. If you don’t do the masters, you probably have to carry on being rejected until you strike it lucky.

    Higher education has really been mis-sold to the general public and Blair’s policy of letting half the population go on to study at university has really watered down the talent pool. The final decisions rest with you, both have pros and cons, I don’t think you’d be massively disadvantaged either way.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    First off what do you want to do? You say you are considering a software dev apprenticeship, that youve applied for graduate entry medicine, you're doing a course that I assume is designed for you to enter the nuclear industry and you did apply for the stp program with the nhs. It is pointless going for a scatter gun approach, you should build up the skills required for the sector you want to work in

    ie

    Medicine - gain relevant work experience (essential for getting onto the course), you cant just do medicine because it is a employable degree, you really have to want to be a doctor
    Not to mention it's an extremely competitive course but like most courses you have to gain any type of experience anyway! Vice versa when job searching I'm afraid OP. :sadnod::sigh:
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by phygrad15)
    I contacted the engineering company myself with my CV and never received a reply. I feel like employers just don't want to know me.

    Is it possible for me to get on a software apprenticeship?

    Should I continue with my masters, or look at other postgrad opportunities?

    Should I give up applying to graduate schemes?
    I wonder how you're marketing yourself considering the high frequency of rejection against your impressive education and experience. It's all well and good having a 1st from a good university, but that counts for nothing if you're not selling yourself and your skills in a way that is appropriate to the roles you're applying for. I graduated in the summer from a good university with a 2.1 degree in the Humanities, and never made it past the CV/Cover Letter stage until I realised how short I was selling myself. After this realisation and adapting my applications accordingly, I began to receive interviews for every role I applied for, and am now in a competitive industry with a competitive salary. I don't think a lot of graduates know how to write a well thought out application, and most depend upon their degree/university ranking to secure them a role (I know I did), but you have to market it all properly if it's going to be of any value to employers.

    I say, continue your Masters, since it is a point of interest for employers and characterises you. I also say, however, continue to apply for jobs and graduate schemes, but think more critically about how you're presenting yourself within your CV/Cover Letter and applications. Don't copy and paste answers, don't mass send CVs, don't ignore role specifications. Do make sure you're hitting all their 'essential' qualities by using their own keywords in your applications, do stress achievements and stop being humble, do spend time revising and editing your answers. Since you've been unemployed for 2 years, this can be a point of contention for prospective employers, so also be careful how you address this gap (don't erase it from your history, instead turn it into a strength: perhaps you've been travelling, or have been volunteering, or following your interests after an academic career. Either way, stress the skills and achievements you've gained during this time).

    Unfortunately, you've progressed too much in your education to apply for apprenticeships, but if you're interested in software engineering, why didn't/don't you apply for a Computer Science MSc?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    have you considered teaching ? with your excellent qualifications you could work in any of our top private schools.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    Just do a PGCE for the 30k bursary and run for a real job, thats what I did.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nucleolus)
    I wonder how you're marketing yourself considering the high frequency of rejection against your impressive education and experience. It's all well and good having a 1st from a good university, but that counts for nothing if you're not selling yourself and your skills in a way that is appropriate to the roles you're applying for. I graduated in the summer from a good university with a 2.1 degree in the Humanities, and never made it past the CV/Cover Letter stage until I realised how short I was selling myself. After this realisation and adapting my applications accordingly, I began to receive interviews for every role I applied for, and am now in a competitive industry with a competitive salary. I don't think a lot of graduates know how to write a well thought out application, and most depend upon their degree/university ranking to secure them a role (I know I did), but you have to market it all properly if it's going to be of any value to employers.

    I say, continue your Masters, since it is a point of interest for employers and characterises you. I also say, however, continue to apply for jobs and graduate schemes, but think more critically about how you're presenting yourself within your CV/Cover Letter and applications. Don't copy and paste answers, don't mass send CVs, don't ignore role specifications. Do make sure you're hitting all their 'essential' qualities by using their own keywords in your applications, do stress achievements and stop being humble, do spend time revising and editing your answers. Since you've been unemployed for 2 years, this can be a point of contention for prospective employers, so also be careful how you address this gap (don't erase it from your history, instead turn it into a strength: perhaps you've been travelling, or have been volunteering, or following your interests after an academic career. Either way, stress the skills and achievements you've gained during this time).

    Unfortunately, you've progressed too much in your education to apply for apprenticeships, but if you're interested in software engineering, why didn't/don't you apply for a Computer Science MSc?
    Agreed with this post 100%.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by phygrad15)
    I graduated in 2015 with a first class degree in physics (BSc). I published work in a journal as part of my final year project, called physica status solidi. I entered university as a mature student and I am now 29. I also have a few "As" at A level but they were a long time ago now.

    Over the past two years I have been rejected from almost everything I have applied for and have only worked as a temporary exam marker over the summer. I have never earnt above minimum wage. In May 2017 I was rejected at the final stage from the NHS scientist training programme in medical physics and just recently I was rejected from an entry level graduate job as an acoustics engineer. I have been rejected from minimum wage lab technician roles as well as every other graduate scheme I ever applied for.

    I am totally lost at this point and don't know what to do. Currently I am enrolled on an MSc in nuclear science and technology at the University of Manchester, but I am thinking of withdrawing as I am tired of studying with no job in sight and it may not lead to a job. Despite there being a resurgance in nuclear power in the UK I would probably still lack experience and be rejected by the graduate scheme employers. My course is hard, I'm jaded and don't have a lot of work experience. My MSc is free (no tuition fees due to my grades). Would I be a fool to withdraw?

    There was someone who dropped out after the first year on my undergraduate course. She instead chose to do a software apprenticeshp with the DWP and now works as a java developer, which is a good job.I looked at the apprenticeship myself and can't do it, as it is a "level 4" course whereas my degree is "level 6". In reality, the national framework for qualifications is meaningless as her apprenticeship is worth far more than my degree. My degree is worth no more than toilet paper, as has proven to be the case. It's a shame as I enjoyed physics.

    I have a few years of volunteer work on my CV in addition to office work. I don't have any internships but I do have good references. I present myself well but I am not getting anywhere. I was liked at my previous jobs and was always polite and got work done.To be honest, I wish I had never gone to university, or at least done something employable like medicine. I applied to graduate medicine this cycle but I will probably get rejected from that as well. I am not down on myself here, I'm just being realistic.

    There are a few people from my undergradute course who have jobs. One did a PGCE and is a primary teacher and another works in an engineering company. I contacted the engineering company myself with my CV and never received a reply. I feel like employers just don't want to know me. My undergraduate university is lower down the league tablets (I want to mainain ambiguity) but I don't believe university "prestige" is the reason for my lack of success. I don't have any connections, relevant experience (for anything) and I don't know what options are open to me.

    Is it possible for me to get on a software apprenticeship?

    Should I continue with my masters, or look at other postgrad opportunities?

    Should I give up applying to graduate schemes?
    To add to nucleolus brilliant post I would stay at university if nothing else to make use of the careers department there so they can look over your CV & help you with applications because that sounds like your major sticking point. Not having strictly relevant experience shouldn't matter as long as you have some experience. How you present it makes a massive difference though.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    Useful resources

    Articles and guides:

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A-Z of careers Advice on choosing a careerCV writing helpCovering letter helpInterview tips

    Featured recruiter profiles:

    CGI logo

    CGI is open for applications

    "Offering a range of apprentice and sponsored degree positions."

    Deutsche Bank logo

    Deutsche Bank is recruiting

    "Thrive in an international banking environment"

    ICAEW logo

    Merck

    "Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

    Army logo

    The Army is recruiting now

    "With hundreds of roles available, there’s more than one way to be the best."

    Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

    Handle your digital footprint

    What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

    Quick links:

    Unanswered career sector and employment threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.