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Are your pets scared of the sound of fireworks? Watch

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    Many people campaign that fireworks should be banned, one of the reasons being the distress they cause pets as well wildlife.

    How do your pets respond to the sound of fireworks? My current cats don't bother with the sound and the only time I have witnessed them show any signs of distress with loud noises is when the Typhoon jets zoom by our house when the local air show is on. That being said though, we always make sure they are indoors during firework season just to be safe.

    Animal charity, Blue Cross has released some tips on how to keep your pets safe and comfortable during firework season. From small pets to horses, advice is available right here

    Small pets such as rabbits, hamsters, birds, ferrits and guinea pigs -
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    • Hutches/cages and enclosures should, if possible, be brought into a quiet room indoors, or into a garage or shed.
    • Give your pet extra bedding to burrow into so it feels safe.
    • If you cannot bring your pet’s hutch inside, you should turn its enclosure around so that it faces a wall orfence instead of the open garden.
    • Cover any aviaries or hutches with thick blankets or a duvet to block out the sight of the fireworks and deaden the sound of the bangs, but make sure there is enough ventilation.


    Cats and dogs -
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    • Always keep dogs and cats inside when fireworks are being let off
    • Make sure your dog is walked earlier in the day before the fireworks start
    • Close all windows and doors, and block off catflaps to stop pets escaping and to keep noise to a minimum. Draw the curtains, and if the animals are used to the sounds of TV or radio, switch them on (but not too loudly) in order to block out some of the noise of the fireworks.
    • Ensure dogs are wearing some form of easily readable identification (ID) – even in the house. They should have at least a collar and tag.
    • Think about fitting pets with a microchip, so that if they do run away they have a better chance of being quickly reunited with you
    • Prepare a ‘den’ for your pet where it can feel safe and comfortable – perhaps under a bed with some of your old clothes. They may like to hide there when the fireworks start.
    • Let your pet pace around, whine, miaow and hide in a corner if they want to. Do not try to coax them out – it’s just trying to find safety, and should not be disturbed.
    • Stay calm, act normally and give lots of praise for calm behaviour. It’s OK to cuddle and stroke your pet if it helps them relax, but if they prefer to hide under your bed, then let them do this instead.
    • Avoid leaving your pet alone during such potentially upsetting events. If you do have to leave the house, don’t get angry with your pet if you find they have been destructive or toileted after being left on its own. Shouting at a frightened pet will only make them more stressed.
    • Don’t tie your dog up outside while fireworks are being let off, ie outside a shop while you pop inside, or leave them in the garden or in your car.
    • Never take your dog to a fireworks display. Even if they doesn’t bark or whimper at the noise, it doesn’t mean they are happy. Excessive panting and yawning can indicate that your dog is stressed.




    Horses and ponies -

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    • Fireworks must not be set off near livestock or horses in fields, or close to buildings housing livestock. Anyone planning a firework display in a rural area should warn neighbouring farmers in advance.
    • Try to make sure that fireworks are never set off near your horse’s field or stable. Tell neighbours and local fireworks display organisers there are horses nearby, so that they can ensure fireworks are set off in the opposite direction and well away from them.
    • Keep your horse in a familiar environment, in their normal routine with any companions to make them feel secure. If your horse is usually stabled then keep them stabled. If they are normally out in the field, keep them there as long as it is safe, secure and not near the fireworks display area.
    • Ensure that you or someone experienced stays with your horse if you know fireworks are being set off. This way you can observe their behaviour, ensure they remains as safe and calm as possible and respond to its reactions appropriately.
    • If you know your horse reacts badly to loud noises speak to your vet or perhaps consider moving your horse for the night
    • Try to remain calm and positive as horses can sense unease in a person and this might make things worse if the horse is startled
    • Be careful yourself. Try not to get in the way if your horse becomes startled as you may get hurt.
    • Don’t take the risk of riding when you think fireworks might be set off
    • If it is necessary for you to leave your horse in the care of another person during a fireworks show, leave clear instructions and contact details for yourself and your vet should any problems arise



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    My cats have never cared as far as I can tell. They act exactly the same way whenever there are fireworks going on. Honestly I'm probably more annoyed by fireworks than they are.
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    One of my dogs is more bothered than the other. The birds are usually ok, but my parrot was a bit wound up with it all for an hour earlier. he doesn't like the really loud ones, prefers the whistley types.
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    my lil fluffball doesn't give a flying sht haha

    she's more scared of cars to be honest
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    Earlier tonight, I was trying to watch Strictly Come Dancing whilst my Pugalier dog (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel x Pug) was running around barking at the fireworks, even running across the windowsill and scratching the doors. (He was exactly the same last year too).
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    One of my cats is scared of loud noises in general - if she's eating and you put a plate down too loudly she'll leg it :lol: She hides under the bed while the fireworks are going off. Whereas the other one isn't at all bothered, he goes out into the garden and watches the neighbours' do their fireworks every year!
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    My cats are pussies when it comes to fireworks
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    That's all good advice!

    My dog hates them.
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    I don't have a pet.

    Thunderstorms are an awful lot louder than one or two fireworks.
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    Our cats always stand on the window ledge and eat the displays from the inside. They're mesmerized by the fireworks.
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