I left my job because of racist incidents, how do i explain this to future employers?

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James.Carnell
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I have experience but I have left all of my jobs within 6 months. I have had three jobs since graduating. My current job, I have left after 6 months because of explicit racist incidents from a colleague and HR doing nothing about it. I graduated in 2013.
Note I did not fail probation, I was competent in my job.

I don't think my career is going anywhere fast but I need a job to keep some money coming in. Then hopefully when I get another job then I can think about doing well and progressing.
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Crumpet1
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Maybe try temping. That way you can try out whether you like a workplace, then if a perm job comes up there you can go for it.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by James.Carnell)
I have experience but I have left all of my jobs within 6 months. I have had three jobs since graduating. My current job, I have left after 6 months because of explicit racist incidents from a colleague and HR doing nothing about it. I graduated in 2013.
Note I did not fail probation, I was competent in my job.

I don't think my career is going anywhere fast but I need a job to keep some money coming in. Then hopefully when I get another job then I can think about doing well and progressing.
You've got a problem. Re-think your reasons for leaving, and make sure they aren't something flakey like 'it wasn't for me'. Presumably you will be relying on a couple of these roles for references? What reasons will they give for you leaving, if they are asked?

You must stick at jobs for longer, no matter what the environment or you will put yourself out of the running for a conventional career- if that is what you are looking for - it doesn't have to be.
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James.Carnell
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
You've got a problem. Re-think your reasons for leaving, and make sure they aren't something flakey like 'it wasn't for me'. Presumably you will be relying on a couple of these roles for references? What reasons will they give for you leaving, if they are asked?

You must stick at jobs for longer, no matter what the environment or you will put yourself out of the running for a conventional career- if that is what you are looking for - it doesn't have to be.
I have colleagues that are happy to give me a reference from that job. So, obtaining a reference will be fine. But I just get the sense that employers won't care about why I left but more that I left in the first place. I hope I am wrong about that.

Yeah, that is the part I could not do. I know I could have stayed for another few months, but the guy was trying to aggravate me every single day and if I stayed I may have broke the law by breaking his face... basically.
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shawn_o1
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It would be best to show that you're honest about your previous employment experience, and that you are keen on the jobs that you apply for. I've gone through something similar where I received "training" in my previous "job" - training to lie to others about myself (because what my employers didn't tell me was that they were going to use my name to apply to positions well out of my reach). Once I called out those practices to an unaware employer, I was fired (and forced to sign a non-disclosure "agreement"). Of course, it meant that talking about my previous job got a bit embarrassing.
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James.Carnell
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(Original post by Crumpet1)
Maybe try temping. That way you can try out whether you like a workplace, then if a perm job comes up there you can go for it.
I would like to. Is it not quite difficult to get one of those roles outside London nowadays? I live in the north east.
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ILuvFood1234
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(Original post by James.Carnell)
I have experience but I have left all of my jobs within 6 months. I have had three jobs since graduating. My current job, I have left after 6 months because of explicit racist incidents from a colleague and HR doing nothing about it. I graduated in 2013.
Note I did not fail probation, I was competent in my job.

I don't think my career is going anywhere fast but I need a job to keep some money coming in. Then hopefully when I get another job then I can think about doing well and progressing.
There's something called whistleblowing.... 👀
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James.Carnell
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(Original post by shawn_o1)
It would be best to show that you're honest about your previous employment experience, and that you are keen on the jobs that you apply for. I've gone through something similar where I received "training" in my previous "job" - training to lie to others about myself (because what my employers didn't tell me was that they were going to use my name to apply to positions well out of my reach). Once I called out those practices to an unaware employer, I was fired (and forced to sign a non-disclosure "agreement". Of course, it meant that talking about my previous job got a bit embarrassing.
The guy that was being racist was working at the law firm as an independent translater. So, he was not even an employee really but they still did not really do anything about it. My direct manager did nothing despite me protesting that he was racially harassing me everyday. It's a bit of a strange one.
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James.Carnell
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(Original post by ILuvFood1234)
There's something called whistleblowing.... 👀
I have thought about it. I know it will put off a lot of employers. But if they have destroyed my career anyway, then I will most likely go after them because it does not feel right. I am involved in an exchange of emails with their HR partner at the moment who is representing them. I think I am in a good position with regards to this. If I am screwed anyway, I am not going to be exactly very forgiving.
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Crumpet1
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(Original post by James.Carnell)
I would like to. Is it not quite difficult to get one of those roles outside London nowadays? I live in the north east.
Reed, Adecco, Office Angels are all national firms. If you walk up any high street you're likely to find at least one temping agency, probably more.
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James.Carnell
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(Original post by Crumpet1)
Reed, Adecco, Office Angels are all national firms. If you walk up any high street you're likely to find at least one temping agency, probably more.
Thanks. So do you walk inside and explain your situation to them? I am very unaware this existed.
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Crumpet1
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(Original post by James.Carnell)
Thanks. So do you walk inside and explain your situation to them? I am very unaware this existed.
They will be more interested in your skills, not your reasons for leaving your last job. You'd go in and register your details and skills, then call every week to find out if any of their clients have got anything that you could be considered for. An assignment offered to you might be for a day, a week, or longer. The more you take and prove yourself reliable, the more the temping agency is likely to trust you and send you on good jobs. You'd be working at their client's premises, but contracted to and paid by the temping agency. If the client likes you (and if there is an ongoing job) they may ask to keep you. Or you might like the client so you know to look at their vacancies.

At the very least it's a stop gap while you look for perm jobs.
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James.Carnell
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(Original post by Crumpet1)
They will be more interested in your skills, not your reasons for leaving your last job. You'd go in and register your details and skills, then call every week to find out if any of their clients have got anything that you could be considered for. An assignment offered to you might be for a day, a week, or longer. The more you take and prove yourself reliable, the more the temping agency is likely to trust you and send you on good jobs. You'd be working at their client's premises, but contracted to and paid by the temping agency. If the client likes you (and if there is an ongoing job) they may ask to keep you. Or you might like the client so you know to look at their vacancies.

At the very least it's a stop gap while you look for perm jobs.
I will give it a try. Could it be the case that they just sign me up and then never call me back like recruitment consultants did? Or is it more that I have to always go back (which is fine) and pester them for jobs?
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Crumpet1
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(Original post by James.Carnell)
I will give it a try. Could it be the case that they just sign me up and then never call me back like recruitment consultants did? Or is it more that I have to always go back (which is fine) and pester them for jobs?
Yes, especially if you have no skills or your skills don't align with what they want. But I signed with several, and used to phone every Thursday or Friday to find out what they had next week. I said yes to everything and it kept me busy.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by James.Carnell)
I have thought about it. I know it will put off a lot of employers. But if they have destroyed my career anyway, then I will most likely go after them because it does not feel right. I am involved in an exchange of emails with their HR partner at the moment who is representing them. I think I am in a good position with regards to this. If I am screwed anyway, I am not going to be exactly very forgiving.
Your thinking is all squiffy here. Employers rarely ask why you left your previous role, leave it blank on any application forms. If they do ask, then give some reason that isn't the primary reason, but makes sense - preferably a pull factor that the new employer offers and not a push factor.

For example, I left a job once because my Boss didn't much like me, and we agreed not to convert an interim contract into a permanent one, even though I dearly wanted to go permanent because i loved the job. The timing was dreadful professionally and could have made me look like a job hopper, but I had agreed a good reference. So when I interviewed for other roles, I took the initiative and described the move as a restructuring, that could have included me and found me a role, but I was always very clear I was looking for a job in X location [like the one I was interviewing for], so it was the best decision for the business. I could still use everything about the last job, that I loved it, that I had a good reference, everything I did. All that changed was a slight, untraceable difference in the balance of a couple of conversations and interpretations.


You don't have to go through an agency to find temporary jobs, just look at an employer that employs lots of young women - there are always maternity cover roles. Many of those same organisations (NHS, local government, universities etc) are also very good at keeping people in jobs when fixed term contracts come to an end.
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hannah00
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just say your were interested in applying your skills in a new environment/looking for a new challenge/company was goes through redundancies/ wanted a career break to learn some new skills
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F C Awditt
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Search ‘Michael Huke’ or ‘Banker Behaving Badly’ (YouTube) and witness this senior Lloyds Bank Managers unscrupulous, unlawful, unethical behaviour and determine if you would dismiss or retain him as Lloyds Bank has?This senior manager survives racist, sexist, bullying and unlawful/unethical acts (within the banking profession) and his bank accepts this and does nothing about it. It's a sorry state but it's the world we live in. You have my symythy and respect.
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