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Should I be talking to a teacher about this? Watch

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    Hi!
    I've got anxiety and I'm autistic. I'm in year 12, and during my GCSE exams I would wake up every morning and almost be sick from nerves, then when I got into the exam hall I would feel calmer but then suddenly very ill, like I was going to faint, I think it was just the build up of adrenaline? I don't know.

    Problem is... now I'm getting it on regular days. Just going to school. It's making me almost not turn up because I feel so sick in the morning, sometimes I can't concentrate on the lessons because I'm too busy trying to calm myself down, when I get home I'm so upset with my brain not working properly and tired from panicking, I'm finding it difficult to get work done. I don't even know what I'm scared of anymore, and I know it's all in my head, but I still can't control it.

    I go to therapy, but I don't feel much progress is being made.
    I think the school is pretty oblivious to what is going on.

    Do you think I should go ahead with my current plan of going to talk to a teacher I trust and hoping she knows how to help?
    Or is there something else I should be doing?

    Thanks in advance,
    a kind of desperate sixth former
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    Of course talk to a teacher. Schools often have a lot of support but you need to ask for it in order to get it.
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    I have an 18 year old son with autism who has just started Uni. He went through a lot of anxiety and nerves during the madness that is GCSES and A levels. He said it was like a continual roller coaster of exams and stress and we put in some very good strategies to minimise his stress levels.

    My son was able to sit all exams in a quiet room and not the main school hall. Is that an option for you? He also was allowed 25% extra time for exams which he said was a huge help when going through his paper at the end of the exam.

    Do you have any special/ additional needs support in place or an individual education plan. (It’s called an IEP) ? If your autism is diagnosed and you have evidence from your GP to support this, you need to speak to the Special Needs co- ordinator in the school (SENCO) perhaps best going to see him/her with parents to sort things out for you.

    You really do need specialist support put in place to ease as much pressure and stress from you as possible. Your parents need to be involved closely though so they can be your voice if it is getting too much for you.

    If you have any queries as I have been through the system for 18 years with my son, feel free to inbox me or post on this thread. I will try to help you.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hi!
    I've got anxiety and I'm autistic. I'm in year 12, and during my GCSE exams I would wake up every morning and almost be sick from nerves, then when I got into the exam hall I would feel calmer but then suddenly very ill, like I was going to faint, I think it was just the build up of adrenaline? I don't know.

    Problem is... now I'm getting it on regular days. Just going to school. It's making me almost not turn up because I feel so sick in the morning, sometimes I can't concentrate on the lessons because I'm too busy trying to calm myself down, when I get home I'm so upset with my brain not working properly and tired from panicking, I'm finding it difficult to get work done. I don't even know what I'm scared of anymore, and I know it's all in my head, but I still can't control it.

    I go to therapy, but I don't feel much progress is being made.
    I think the school is pretty oblivious to what is going on.

    Do you think I should go ahead with my current plan of going to talk to a teacher I trust and hoping she knows how to help?
    Or is there something else I should be doing?

    Thanks in advance,
    a kind of desperate sixth former
    I think it would be a great idea to bring it up. They may not know exactly what to do, but they can be aware of it and try their best. They should also be able to get you in tough with the schools student support.
    It might help if you have a think about what might help you. They will have some things they can do, but they won't necessarily know what's best for you because you're an individual and that means having individual needs.

    Bringing it up means starting that discussing and being able to try things out and have a bit more freedom to work out what's best for you.


    So as a bit of an example I had mh issues at college and eventually made the decision to tell my teachers. This is some of the stuff it meant for me:
    It helped me a lot to listen to music while doing work and cos my teachers knew about my issues they cut me some slack and never brought it up.

    I also had one lesson that was always a right pain for me to get to on time because it was so early on a Monday and I had issues with sleep and tiredness. That teacher knew and never told me off for being late.

    And I had big issues with homework. Only one of my courses really had much homework, but I was really behind with it and got into some trouble cos of it. Once I told my teachers about my issues they went way easier on me and didn't push me with it. That really helped give me some more freedom to plan my time how I needed to and prioritise stuff.

    None of that was organised or discussed, it just came from teachers cutting me slack and letting me feel things out a bit. I didn't have to explain myself, I just did stuff and they let me.

    I would definitely go for it. Even f nothing directly comes from it it means they are aware of your issues and can bare that in mind whenever necessary.

    Hope that helps and good luck with everything
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    Hi,

    I would thoroughly recommend talking to a teacher.
    Remember, you won't be the first or the last.
 
 
 
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