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Bit freaked out by the amount to learn for A level chemistry HELP!! Watch

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    So I’m doing Currently doing as chemistry and I’m realising that there’s A LOT of content to learn, and I have been making my own notes after every chemistry lesson but looking at the amount of topics, I have like 50 odd sheets of notes just for the first few topics. I just don’t know how to remember all of the information despite I’ve done my notes like I would for revision. I’m just not sure what to do...

    Any help is highly appreciated.
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    (Original post by Priyanboss517)
    So I’m doing Currently doing as chemistry and I’m realising that there’s A LOT of content to learn, and I have been making my own notes after every chemistry lesson but looking at the amount of topics, I have like 50 odd sheets of notes just for the first few topics. I just don’t know how to remember all of the information despite I’ve done my notes like I would for revision. I’m just not sure what to do...

    Any help is highly appreciated.
    Go onto pastpapers.org and revise by topic rather than through a whole paper. Work through as many past paper questions as you can on a topic, studying the wording of the mark schemes. After a while you will see that the same things come up again and again. Focus on developing your technique for reading the question - the key is to be as specific as possible, not vague in your answers. Things like sig figs and units really matter. Finally, for any calculations, always keep the calculator value in your working out and only round up at the last stage. Very important to use the mole ratio from the balanced equation in any mole calculation. Hope this is useful!
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    (Original post by SEJChem)
    Go onto pastpapers.org and revise by topic rather than through a whole paper. Work through as many past paper questions as you can on a topic, studying the wording of the mark schemes. After a while you will see that the same things come up again and again. Focus on developing your technique for reading the question - the key is to be as specific as possible, not vague in your answers. Things like sig figs and units really matter. Finally, for any calculations, always keep the calculator value in your working out and only round up at the last stage. Very important to use the mole ratio from the balanced equation in any mole calculation. Hope this is useful!

    Thanks a lot, really appreciate it! So should I not make even more notes when is comes do exam season? Just pure past papers and look back at the notes I made if I get stuck?
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    which exam board are you doing? i'm doing aqa
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    (Original post by Bertybassett)
    which exam board are you doing? i'm doing aqa
    WJEC
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    You're supposed to be making your notes as you go topic to topic so that when you come to exam period, you can just flick through them. When it's near exam season you should be moving on to doing a lot questions not making notes as that implies that your notes are not up to date.
    (Original post by Priyanboss517)
    Thanks a lot, really appreciate it! So should I not make even more notes when is comes do exam season? Just pure past papers and look back at the notes I made if I get stuck?
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    (Original post by Priyanboss517)
    Thanks a lot, really appreciate it! So should I not make even more notes when is comes do exam season? Just pure past papers and look back at the notes I made if I get stuck?
    Exactly
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    (Original post by Priyanboss517)
    So I’m doing Currently doing as chemistry and I’m realising that there’s A LOT of content to learn, and I have been making my own notes after every chemistry lesson but looking at the amount of topics, I have like 50 odd sheets of notes just for the first few topics. I just don’t know how to remember all of the information despite I’ve done my notes like I would for revision. I’m just not sure what to do...

    Any help is highly appreciated.
    I'm in year 13 now and got an A in chemistry last year and I found that for chemistry the best thing to do is flashcards and past papers.

    There is a lot to learn, that's true, so putting them in flashcards helps to keep your notes concise and to the point. They're great for remembering reactions, equations and definitions and they're great as you can revise while making them and use them over and over!

    As for past papers they are essential. There's a girl in my chem class this year who had an uncanny ability to recite pages from the textbook from memory but she only got a C last year as she couldn't apply it. The markschemes can be very picky and so by doing past papers you learn what they want you to put for those types of questions and it's great practice for the application and maths parts of the papers.

    I'm not much of a mindmap and diagram kind of girl but I did find diagrams so helpful when it came to mechanisms and remembering where to put the arrows and which bits went where. I also made a little song which I sang under my breath in the paper 2 exam for the mechanisms which was a bit embarrassing but it worked!

    I hope I've helped a little and if you have anymore questions just ask!
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    (Original post by saharan_skies)
    You're supposed to be making your notes as you go topic to topic so that when you come to exam period, you can just flick through them. When it's near exam season you should be moving on to doing a lot questions not making notes as that implies that your notes are not up to date.
    That’s what I’m doing, so it’s literaly past papers and referring back to notes for revision at exam season. Because sure your not going to remember every single detail of content, do you just come to remembering it while doing past papers?
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    (Original post by yeahthatonethere)
    I'm in year 13 now and got an A in chemistry last year and I found that for chemistry the best thing to do is flashcards and past papers.

    There is a lot to learn, that's true, so putting them in flashcards helps to keep your notes concise and to the point. They're great for remembering reactions, equations and definitions and they're great as you can revise while making them and use them over and over!

    As for past papers they are essential. There's a girl in my chem class this year who had an uncanny ability to recite pages from the textbook from memory but she only got a C last year as she couldn't apply it. The markschemes can be very picky and so by doing past papers you learn what they want you to put for those types of questions and it's great practice for the application and maths parts of the papers.

    I'm not much of a mindmap and diagram kind of girl but I did find diagrams so helpful when it came to mechanisms and remembering where to put the arrows and which bits went where. I also made a little song which I sang under my breath in the paper 2 exam for the mechanisms which was a bit embarrassing but it worked!

    I hope I've helped a little and if you have anymore questions just ask!
    Wow this is super helpful, thank you so much! I’m just trying to see how to revise when it comes to exam season instead of being in a mess.
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    (Original post by Priyanboss517)
    Wow this is super helpful, thank you so much! I’m just trying to see how to revise when it comes to exam season instead of being in a mess.
    I'm sure if you put the work in you'll do fine!

    This is more of a tip for after the exams but don't feel too disheartened if you don't think an exam has gone well. I came out of my Paper 1 (AQA) feeling awful, skipped the rest of school because I couldn't deal with anyone else and went home and cried for ages. I felt like I had failed miserably, I didn't answer half the questions and generally just felt so beat down by the sheer amount of maths in the paper that I couldn't do. I go to results day absolutely ******** bricks and find out I've got an A! So seriously don't let it get you too down if you're not confident with your performance on an exam.

    Good luck mate!
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    (Original post by saharan_skies)
    You're supposed to be making your notes as you go topic to topic so that when you come to exam period, you can just flick through them. When it's near exam season you should be moving on to doing a lot questions not making notes as that implies that your notes are not up to date.

    (Original post by yeahthatonethere)
    I'm in year 13 now and got an A in chemistry last year and I found that for chemistry the best thing to do is flashcards and past papers.

    There is a lot to learn, that's true, so putting them in flashcards helps to keep your notes concise and to the point. They're great for remembering reactions, equations and definitions and they're great as you can revise while making them and use them over and over!

    As for past papers they are essential. There's a girl in my chem class this year who had an uncanny ability to recite pages from the textbook from memory but she only got a C last year as she couldn't apply it. The markschemes can be very picky and so by doing past papers you learn what they want you to put for those types of questions and it's great practice for the application and maths parts of the papers.

    I'm not much of a mindmap and diagram kind of girl but I did find diagrams so helpful when it came to mechanisms and remembering where to put the arrows and which bits went where. I also made a little song which I sang under my breath in the paper 2 exam for the mechanisms which was a bit embarrassing but it worked!

    I hope I've helped a little and if you have anymore questions just ask!


    Whats a good approach to memorise notes ? I condensed a 12 page chapter in a textbook to 6 pages of A4 notes(in Q&A format, lots of bullet points). My textbook has 12 chapters, so that around 72 pages.

    I thought I could memorise 6 pages a day, so gave myself 12 morning to memorise it, and in the afternoon I would attempt questions.

    However, as I started memorising then last exam season, i struggled to remember more than 3 a day, and by the 12th day, I had forgotten the earlier chapters.


    Am I just stupid lol ?
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    (Original post by hannah00)
    Whats a good approach to memorise notes ? I condensed a 12 page chapter in a textbook to 6 pages of A4 notes(in Q&A format, lots of bullet points). My textbook has 12 chapters, so that around 72 pages.

    I thought I could memorise 6 pages a day, so gave myself 12 morning to memorise it, and in the afternoon I would attempt questions.

    However, as I started memorising then last exam season, i struggled to remember more than 3 a day, and by the 12th day, I had forgotten the earlier chapters.


    Am I just stupid lol ?
    Trying to remember 6 pages a day sounds like a lot in my opinion!

    I personally bought a pack of flashcards and made a set on each topic from my notes (e.g. "Redox" "Atomic Structure" "Energetics" at the start of the year and went through all the chemistry ones one week, biology ones the next, psychology the week after and RS the week after that and just continued the schedule until the exams. The flash cards would have questions like:

    "What three factors affect the strength of a metallic bond?"
    and on the other side I'd have
    ">Number of protons - More = Stronger
    >Number of delocalised electrons - More = Stronger
    >Size of ion - Smaller = Stronger"

    If you constantly go over them throughout the year, not just during exam season, the notes will stick in your head more!

    Past papers also help you remember notes too! By doing a ton you will start to see patterns of what they want in an answer for certain topics e.g. for Le Chatelier's Principle you generally have to say "The equilibrium will shift [left/right] to oppose the [increase/decrease] in [concentration/temperature/pressure/etc] because [reason]" to get the marks and you can apply that kind of logic to most equilibrium questions.

    Hope that's helped and anymore questions just ask!
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    I'm doing 7 new different subjects in my last year (missed a year from illness). I haven't even started revision yet so you're already ahead of me tbh.
    My teachers all predicted A's for me so my uni reference will look good, I just need to start working.

    Maybe if I get a conditional offer from my top uni I will start working like there's no yesterday.
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    (Original post by yeahthatonethere)
    I'm sure if you put the work in you'll do fine!

    This is more of a tip for after the exams but don't feel too disheartened if you don't think an exam has gone well. I came out of my Paper 1 (AQA) feeling awful, skipped the rest of school because I couldn't deal with anyone else and went home and cried for ages. I felt like I had failed miserably, I didn't answer half the questions and generally just felt so beat down by the sheer amount of maths in the paper that I couldn't do. I go to results day absolutely ******** bricks and find out I've got an A! So seriously don't let it get you too down if you're not confident with your performance on an exam.

    Good luck mate!
    That’s amazing, thanks for the tips.
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    i used the dr boescodnensed noets which cut out what you dotn need to know .I manganed to get an a* with them
 
 
 
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