University System Watch

Liz1919
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Could somebody please explain the university system i,e what is undergraduate, postgraduate and also the years of study because people say that you study medicine for 8 years but on some websites it say 3/4 years
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jsg9
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Undergraduate is the level of study you enter without a degree. So if you're leaving high school or equivalent you do an undergraduate degree. Once you have a Bachelor's degree, BSc/BA or similar, you can progress on to postgraduate study which is the level where you will already have a degree. Postgraduate degrees are Masters degrees or PhD/D.Phil. They are often research based but not always. To enter into a postgraduate course you must have graduated from an undergraduate course.

Now medicine: in the U.K. standard entry medicine (UCAS code A100) is five years long at most universities, with some universities having a six year long course, as these include an "intercalated degree" - this is where you will take a year out of medicine to study another area, usually an area of biomedical sciences or similar. Medicine in the U.K. is an undergraduate course if you hold A levels or similar, and is a Bachelor's degree: BMBS, MBChB or similar, all the letters equate to a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery degree. If the undergraduate medicine course is 6 years you may also be awarded a BSc or BMedSci degree.

If you already have a Bachelors degree, you can do "graduate entry medicine". This course is usually four years long, and is still a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery degree.

If you already hold a primary medical qualification (PMQ), there are areas of post-graduate medicine you could take on, I believe Bath offer a M.D (Doctor of Medicine) degree for those who are already doctors. Hope that explains it
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Last edited by jsg9; 11 months ago
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Liz1919
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(Original post by jsg9)
Undergraduate is the level of study you enter without a degree. So if you're leaving high school or equivalent you do an undergraduate degree. Once you have a Bachelor's degree, BSc/BA or similar, you can progress on to postgraduate study which is the level where you will already have a degree. Postgraduate degrees are Masters degrees or PhD/D.Phil. They are often research based but not always. To enter into a postgraduate course you must have graduated from an undergraduate course.

Now medicine: in the U.K. standard entry medicine (UCAS code A100) is five years long at most universities, with some universities having a six year long course, as these include an "intercalated degree" - this is where you will take a year out of medicine to study another area, usually an area of biomedical sciences or similar. Medicine in the U.K. is an undergraduate course if you hold A levels or similar, and is a Bachelor's degree: BMBS, MBChB or similar, all the letters equate to a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery degree. If the undergraduate medicine course is 6 years you may also be awarded a BSc or BMedSci degree.

If you already have a Bachelors degree, you can do "graduate entry medicine". This course is usually four years long, and is still a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery degree.

If you already hold a primary medical qualification (PMQ), there are areas of post-graduate medicine you could take on, I believe Bath offer a M.D (Doctor of Medicine) degree for those who are already doctors. Hope that explains it
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