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Do British people really hate American accents? watch

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    I am an international student coming to study in the UK. I speak perfect English but my accent is kind of American since I learned American English all my life. Will this make me stand out negatively in the UK? I feel like faking a British accent will be much more annoying to British people than actually speaking with the accent I naturally have. This is probably a lame thing to worry about but I'm just curious. Will everyone just ask me where I'm from when they hear a non-British accent or is it common in the UK?
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    (Original post by RowanneK)
    I am international student coming to study in the UK. I speak perfect English but my accent is kind of American since I learned American English all my life. Will this make me stand out negatively in the UK? I feel like faking a British accent will be much more annoying to British people than actually speaking with the accent I naturally have. This is probably a lame thing to worry about but I'm just curious. Will everyone just ask me where I'm from when they hear a non-British accent or is it common in the UK?
    People will probably ask where you're from because they're curious I have noticed myself a fair amount of international students that are not from the US but learnt American English and speak sort of with an American accent. It is not a negative thing, however if you try to fake a British accent (or in general any accent) it will be noticeable and it will come off weird so I would advise just to speak how you normally speak

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    I don't think it would be a negative aspect. Faking a British accent would definitely be worse!

    You also won't be the first or last international student at your university, so other students will likely be used to hearing other dialects and even languages around campus.

    Don't worry about it.
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    (Original post by RowanneK)
    I am an international student coming to study in the UK. I speak perfect English but my accent is kind of American since I learned American English all my life. Will this make me stand out negatively in the UK? I feel like faking a British accent will be much more annoying to British people than actually speaking with the accent I naturally have. This is probably a lame thing to worry about but I'm just curious. Will everyone just ask me where I'm from when they hear a non-British accent or is it common in the UK?
    Don't fake an accent. No-one would pick on you just because they hate your accent. At university, you'll meet many people abroad and from the UK who all have a different accent. You having an American one would just make you unique, as most people like people who are different.
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    Do not fake being British, it will probably work against you. Speak normally and you'll be fine.
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    (Original post by RowanneK)
    Will this make me stand out negatively in the UK?
    No.

    Edit: however you might need a "British English" decoder to help you understand what people really mean when you talk to them

    See below...
    Spoiler:
    Show





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    (Original post by markovchain17)
    People will probably ask where you're from because they're curious I have noticed myself a fair amount of international students that are not from the US but learnt American English and speak sort of with an American accent. It is not a negative thing, however if you try to fake a British accent (or in general any accent) it will be noticeable and it will come off weird so I would advise just to speak how you normally speak

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    Exactly what I thought! I love how British people speak (I realize there are tons of different British accents but when I think of a British accent I mean the one I hear on the BBC or something lol) However, just like you pointed out faking any accent is really annoying. I do not fake my American-ish accent I just happened to pick it up naturally (having American teachers at school, watching American shows...etc) so I was curious as to how it will be perceived in the UK. Thanks for the insight !
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    (Original post by RowanneK)
    Exactly what I thought! I love how British people speak (I realize there are tons of different British accents but when I think of a British accent I mean the one I hear on the BBC or something lol) However, just like you pointed out faking any accent is really annoying. I do not fake my American-ish accent I just happened to pick it up naturally (having American teachers at school, watching American shows...etc) so I was curious as to how it will be perceived in the UK. Thanks for the insight !
    Welcome to the UK btw Where abouts are you going in the UK to study?
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    No.

    Edit: however you might need a "British English" decoder to help you understand what people really mean when you talk to them:
    Spoiler:
    Show





    That table just about sums up the British way of speaking perfectly.

    Really your accent will not be a big deal with so many people about from different parts of the world. Like above it will be more useful to know what people mean as we don't talk literally but instead most of us use codes to hide meaning or avoid offence.
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    Speak however works best for you. You will probably start having a more British accent sneak in, and honestly we won't mind what accent you use. Accents in the UK can change as frequently as post codes, we're used to variations!
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    I’m sure they’ll be fine - but if you bust out a ‘HELLO GUV’NOR’ - game over.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    No.

    Edit: however you might need a "British English" decoder to help you understand what people really mean when you talk to them

    See below...
    Spoiler:
    Show







    Lol this table is very helpful indeed! Actually, I do understand the hidden meaning behind most of the things in this table so i guess it is safe to say that i'll be fine in the UK
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    (Original post by jabbathemuttdog)
    I’m sure they’ll be fine - but if you bust out a ‘HELLO GUV’NOR’ - game over.
    I actually had to no idea what that means until I looked it up. Thank for the tip though
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    (Original post by markovchain17)
    Welcome to the UK btw Where abouts are you going in the UK to study?
    Thank you! I don't know yet. It's either Edinburgh, London, or Southampton... still waiting to hear back from my unis.
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    Just speak normally and be yourself. People will ask you where you're from out of curiosity, that's all. I've had a few Americans in my school before and we've gotten on well. There'll be a lot of international students at uni anyway, so a lot of people will be in the same boat as you.
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    (Original post by RowanneK)
    I am an international student coming to study in the UK. I speak perfect English but my accent is kind of American since I learned American English all my life. Will this make me stand out negatively in the UK? I feel like faking a British accent will be much more annoying to British people than actually speaking with the accent I naturally have. This is probably a lame thing to worry about but I'm just curious. Will everyone just ask me where I'm from when they hear a non-British accent or is it common in the UK?
    I speak American English and I had fair bit of trouble with having an American accent.

    When I first moved into dorms, I had mainly British women having a problem with it…I got the reaction of ''ugh he's a yank how mining''
    I find a lot of people cringe at some American words I used like '' hey whats up'' or ''dude hows it going'' ''bro Im outta here'' ''Happy Holidays''
    which is frustrating…Even at uni If I got one answer wrong in lectures, a lot of the people give off a smirk or a ''ppfft dumb American in the house''
    Just be careful when you go there bro, most of British are indirectly anti American and can't stand American accents often looking down on people like us.

    But it has its plus sides though.
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    I would just act normally.... but perhaps just be conscious of US stereo-types and work slightly against them (eg being too informal in a formal setting, being too loud, stating an opinion as fact, exaggerating, being over-sensitive, lacking all sense of detail...etc) I would watch and learn, maybe tone-down a few things, but I wouldn't fake an accent, unless you are extremely good. In what was a relatively short space of time (WW2), some German spies were able to speak perfect regional English without ever having visited England, but I don't know how they did it. Good Luck.
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    (Original post by Killian_1992)
    When I first moved into dorms, I had mainly British women having a problem with it…I got the reaction of ''ugh he's a yank how mining''
    Where was this?

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Where was this?

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    Manchester bro. Im not fabricating this, but I swear some people can really dislike you for it…They found it ''annoying'' ''Stupid'' and ''simple'' and labeled me that based off there shallow stereotype even though I'm not American. it really made my time settling in here difficult whichI won't go into detail.
    Bareing in mind these are people in the U.K that come from backgrounds that are trash. even in my essay exam my ex teacher ust to roll his eyes and correct the American spelling in front of a whole lecture -_-.
    Its that kind of mind set.
    BUT, On the flip rise becose of my accent I made a load of friends. At house parties when I'm socialising its a que for a conversation. And once got a first class ticket on a train paid for me because they thought I was canadian...no joke lol...
    So it has its plus sides. But in my opinion try not to use very American words there incase of trouble.
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    (Original post by RowanneK)
    I am an international student coming to study in the UK. I speak perfect English but my accent is kind of American since I learned American English all my life. Will this make me stand out negatively in the UK? I feel like faking a British accent will be much more annoying to British people than actually speaking with the accent I naturally have. This is probably a lame thing to worry about but I'm just curious. Will everyone just ask me where I'm from when they hear a non-British accent or is it common in the UK?
    Actually I quite like American accents

    And there are an array of different people at uni from different places so it won't matter
    If you don't mind me asking, which uni are you going to and to study what?
 
 
 
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