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    I just wanted to air my emotions right now. I have a daughter, 16 years old, and she just opened up that she's bisexual. I am not homophobic and I have many gay friends, but somehow, I am still shocked to know that my daughter just expressed her own true self. Now I question my own self -- am I ready to accept my daughter about this? I love her, no question about that. But why do I have some reservations about this?
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    Would you have had this same reaction if she said she was straight? I assume not, meaning you have a problem with her being with a woman. Sounds like you might be slightly homophobic. I'm honestly not saying that in a rude or mean way, but that's my thought about this.
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    you are subtly homophobic
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    You have reservations because when you had your daughter, you initially visualised her- probably all of her life, with a man as that is stereotypically the 'common' way to be. Of course, you love her, this is just a shock! Just remember what she has just done has taken so much courage and (I'm sure you are) but please remind her how proud you are of her! Perhaps you can talk to some of your friends who you say are gay as they are bound to offer another perspective, their own stories even that can help you to know how to best approach this. As for 'are you ready to accept your daughter like this?' She's still your daughter and nothing has to change at all. It will, of course, take some adjusting to but I can almost promise you it won't be as hard as you think. You asking for advice just shows how much you care about her. It really doesn't have to change and her opening up to you can even be the start of a closer- even better relationship between you both.Props to your daughter and you!
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    In fairness if i were you id like to think on my son/daughters sexual tastes as little as possible. Love her for her and pay as much attention to her preference as you deem it worthy.
    As a side note it has been said that many teenage girls go through a 'phase' of liking girls and that girls are also never straight, per say so make what you will of it.
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    If your parents didn't approve of whatever sexuality you are, how would you feel? I don't mean that to be mean, just to see it from her side if you were to fall down the route of nonacceptance. At 16 to be able to tell her mother that - that's brave. That takes metaphorical balls that most people - let alone teenagers - don't have. I think you should also show that you value how she's telling you this. She didn't have to. She could have kept it to herself and left you oblivious, but she's chosen to involve you and keep you in the loop.

    To be honest, I don't blame you for being a bit taken aback - even though the modern age is very multicultural from a sexuality point of view, naturally your 'norm' wasn't the present modern age. It would have been a little to a lot further back depending on your age, but the point being, it's of a time where it was 'less normal'. My dad, for example, he's grown up feeling corporal punishment is okay because that was very normal in his day and age when he was a kid, or a teen, or a young adult. Don't feel bad about it, but do try and realise it's more than just "My daughter is bisexual".

    This is "My daughter trusts me enough to tell me something so deeply personal that she didn't have to", "My daughter wants my support and chose to open up to me", "My daughter sees me as a mum, and not just a mother."

    Your daughter has my respect to say the least, and you know what? So do you. To stop and think about it and try to understand your apprehension rather than condemning it on the spot. We never stop learning no matter what age, right?
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    You might have reservations because when you look at and talk to your daughter, she doesn’t look like the kind of person you’d expect to be bi. Forget the ‘subtly homophobic’ rubbish above.
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    Thank you for all your wonderful replies. Somehow, I feel relieved after reading your comments. Last night, I made a short self-awareness activity and I found out several things that made me feel this way. I read this article that helped me through the process: https://www.betterhelp.com/advice/re...omeone-deeply/
    Although it's about getting to know someone, I used the same questions about myself. The results were surprising but somehow I have come to the realization of my feelings towards my daughter.
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    I guess as a parent it's normal to have reservations at first. because for one, you were not expecting it; it came as a surprise. But you know deep in your heart that you would accept her for whoever she is. it's good to read articles like the one you shared to help you with the process.
 
 
 
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