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Best mate likes drugs and I don't - HELP advice!!! Watch

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    Hi I need help on this subject..

    My mate loves drugs but I don't. And I think our friendship may be breaking up to them realising how much I actually hate drugs. I know that people have got amazing personalities I just don't like the sort how it affects your body. That's what worries me when my friend takes it, I just get concerned about them, and their health? But they don't think I hate drugs cause of that reason...

    Idk what to do, please any advice would be the very best!!!

    Thank you
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    If they have no intention of stopping then you can't do anything but stop caring. Are they taking anything particularly dangerous anyway?
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    You don't have to do anything lol. Let them take drugs without you and talk to them when they're sober.

    You can educate yourself on what they're taking and find out who they're buying from to see how safe it is if you want lol. you can get testing kits off the internet as well to see if the drug you're taking is what you think it is.

    The danger from illegal drugs is because it's usually something else. The actual drug like cocaine, MDMA, weed, etc. aren't dangerous on their own in small amounts. Pretty much anything you find in the UK is gonna be laced with something else unless you made/grew it yourself though.
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    She said that she takes weed, but has a lot worse from time to time. And yh I just know that they aren't goood for u, and ik that I'm not going to change her, just not sure on what I can do to help her and still remain on our friendship as if nothing has changed. As we are close friends
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    So long as she's not going overboard with it, or addicted to anything, she won't suffer any serious health issues. As chicken madness said, the main danger is impurities, so long as she knows they're safe, and she isn't mixing them wrongly, she should be fine.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    She said that she takes weed, but has a lot worse from time to time. And yh I just know that they aren't goood for u, and ik that I'm not going to change her, just not sure on what I can do to help her and still remain on our friendship as if nothing has changed. As we are close friends
    (Original post by michellincaptain)
    So long as she's not going overboard with it, or addicted to anything, she won't suffer any serious health issues. As chicken madness said, the main danger is impurities, so long as she knows they're safe, and she isn't mixing them wrongly, she should be fine.
    ye if the weed is from some local dude that grew it himself and isn't spraying it with fertilizers and whatever else then it's safe for adults over the age of 21.

    Only concrete thing thats been discovered is that weed is harmful to people under that age because it stunts the growth of your brain and it lowers your memory and IQ once you're an adult. It shrinks the grey matter of your brain which is where alot of the 'thinking / problem solving' stuff happens. People's brains don't stop growing until they're in their 20s. Should probably let her know if she doesn't already she might change her mind if she's a teenager.

    It has minimal affects on adults though.
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    Thank you all for the help and advice!😀
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    What is she trying to escape from? Find the root cause.
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      (Original post by Anonymous)
      She said that she takes weed, but has a lot worse from time to time. And yh I just know that they aren't goood for u, and ik that I'm not going to change her, just not sure on what I can do to help her and still remain on our friendship as if nothing has changed. As we are close friends
      Sounds like she knows what she's doing. If "from time to time" also means small doses, it meand she's probably being careful - but I don't know if it does.

      You're not obliged to condone everything your friends do, by the way. You can remain friends if you still get on.
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      (Original post by Anonymous)
      She said that she takes weed, but has a lot worse from time to time. And yh I just know that they aren't goood for u, and ik that I'm not going to change her, just not sure on what I can do to help her and still remain on our friendship as if nothing has changed. As we are close friends
      There's nothing wrong with that, if you don't want to join her - sure - but that doesn't mean you should treat her any differently for it or try to change what she does if she is happy with her choices. If she is the friend to you that you say she is, don't make a big deal out of nothing and potentially harm that.
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      HI, first thing I would like you to know is this,
      It can be very difficult to watch your friend struggle with drug use. Unfortunately, drugs impair the brain which makes it difficult for your friend to make rational decisions. This can result in some very self-destructive behavior. Therefore, providing effective intervention is very important to your friend’s overall well-being. Contrary to popular belief, a person does not have to hit rock bottom before receiving treatment. In fact, the earlier that your friend receives treatment, the quicker her recovery process will be. Therefore, intervention should be done as soon as a problem is noticed.
      Don't take it with them but you can try to help them stop their habit

      Here are some things to be done
      Prepare a list of problems that the drug use is causing. Before having a discussion with your friend, it’s a good idea to write down all of the problems that are associated with her drug use.[2] Creating this list allows you to be able to stay focused during the conversation. However, be sure to keep the list as concrete as possible. For example, it’s better to write down,
      Select a private place to talk. Make sure that the place that you select is free of distractions and will respect his/her privacy. Inviting him/her to eat out at a quiet restaurant is probably better than trying to have the discussion in the middle of a party. Also, you may want to try to talk to him/her in a place other than his/her home so that she cannot engage in distracting activities.
      Your friend may become defensive when you first approach him/her about your concerns. Avoid accusations or arguments. Stick to the facts and remind yourself to stay calm.

      If he/she tries to shift the conversation to you, you can respond by saying something like, “I know that you don’t agree with everything that I do and I will be happy to talk about those things with you later. Right now though, I’m really concerned about your safety.”
      Identify the negative consequences. Focus on concrete and nonjudgmental statements that reflect your experiences with her behavior. Don’t discuss what other people may feel or have said because that is often unproductive. Also, avoid making generalizations such as “Everyone thinks that you have a problem.” Stick to the facts as you have experienced them.
      Give your friend information. Your friend may not see drugs as a bad thing, so sharing scientific information may help open her eyes. Once your friend is aware of how much drugs affect her brain, body, life, and relationships, she may be more inclined to stop using on her own.
      go with her to an appointment or you can volunteer to accompany her to visit treatment facilities. If your friend knows that she has your support, she may be more open to treatment.
      Even if your friend is reluctant to seek treatment, you can still research treatment options for her. If you find a treatment facility that appeals to her, she may be more likely to consider treatment.[6]
      Confide in a trusted adult if your friend is not an adult and she continues to abuse drugs. Keep in mind that your friend may be angry with you or even feel betrayed by you for a while. However, getting an adult involved is the best way to help her. Eventually she will come back around and understand that you had her best interest at heart.
      Remind yourself that an addiction is a disease of the brain that usually requires treatment for the person to heal.[7] Just like your friend would need to see a doctor if she was suffering from a physical disease, she will need a professional to help her heal from an addiction. Viewing an addiction as a disease that needs treatment may motivate you to seek help from a trusted adult.

      Offer support for your friend. Knowing exactly how to offer support her can be a little tricky because your friend may not want to hear what you have to say. The drugs are likely impacting her mind and she may have fallen in with a rough circle of friends. However, here are some ways that you can support your friend:[8]
      Listen to your friend. If she confides in you, be sure to listen in a nonjudgmental way. It’s probably hard for your friend to open up about her drug use.
      If your fiend is a teenager, encourage your friend to get help from a trusted adult such as a parent, teacher, relative, counselor, clergyman, or coach.
      When she is ready, help her to find a support group or a substance abuse counselor in the local area.

      I hope you understand what I'm trying to state

      "THANK YOU".
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      Hi, First thing
      It can be very difficult to watch your friend struggle with drug use. Unfortunately, drugs impair the brain which makes it difficult for your friend to make rational decisions. This can result in some very self-destructive behavior. Therefore, providing effective intervention is very important to your friend’s overall well-being. Contrary to popular belief, a person does not have to hit rock bottom before receiving treatment. In fact, the earlier that your friend receives treatment, the quicker her recovery process will be. Therefore, intervention should be done as soon as a problem is noticed.
      Prepare a list of problems that the drug use is causing. Before having a discussion with your friend, it’s a good idea to write down all of the problems that are associated with her drug use.[2] Creating this list allows you to be able to stay focused during the conversation. However, be sure to keep the list as concrete as possible.
      Select a private place to talk. Make sure that the place that you select is free of distractions and will respect her privacy. Inviting her to eat out at a quiet restaurant is probably better than trying to have the discussion in the middle of a party. Also, you may want to try to talk to her in a place other than her home so that she cannot engage in distracting activities in an effort to avoid the conversation.

      Tell your friend that you are concerned about her drug use. Of course, this is much easier said than done, however having this conversation is very important. Be sure to bring up the topic in a nonjudgmental way. Always begin the conversation by letting your friend know that you are concerned about her. You want her to know that you are genuinely concerned for her well-being.[4] Use statements that are respectful but also clearly communicate your concern.
      Identify the negative consequences. Focus on concrete and nonjudgmental statements that reflect your experiences with her behavior. Don’t discuss what other people may feel or have said because that is often unproductive. Also, avoid making generalizations such as “Everyone thinks that you have a problem.” Stick to the facts as you have experienced them.

      Expert Reviewed
      How to Help a Friend Quit Doing Drugs
      It can be very difficult to watch your friend struggle with drug use. Unfortunately, drugs impair the brain which makes it difficult for your friend to make rational decisions. This can result in some very self-destructive behavior. Therefore, providing effective intervention is very important to your friend’s overall well-being. Contrary to popular belief, a person does not have to hit rock bottom before receiving treatment. In fact, the earlier that your friend receives treatment, the quicker her recovery process will be. Therefore, intervention should be done as soon as a problem is noticed.

      Part One of Three:
      Talking to Your Friend about Drug Use

      1
      Pay attention to your suspicions. If you suspect that your friend is using drugs, even in small doses, it’s important that someone intervenes early.[1] This can prevent things from getting worse and turning into a full addiction. If she is already addicted, then she already needs even more extensive help.


      2
      Prepare a list of problems that the drug use is causing. Before having a discussion with your friend, it’s a good idea to write down all of the problems that are associated with her drug use.[2] Creating this list allows you to be able to stay focused during the conversation. However, be sure to keep the list as concrete as possible. For example, it’s better to write down, “You damaged the car when you were driving under the influence” than it is to write, “You’re so irresponsible when you’re high.”

      3
      Select a private place to talk. Make sure that the place that you select is free of distractions and will respect her privacy. Inviting her to eat out at a quiet restaurant is probably better than trying to have the discussion in the middle of a party. Also, you may want to try to talk to her in a place other than her home so that she cannot engage in distracting activities in an effort to avoid the conversation.[3]
      Only begin the conversation when your friend is sober. If you try to talk to her when she is under the influence, she will not be able to have a coherent conversation.
      Your friend may become defensive when you first approach her about your concerns. Avoid accusations or arguments. Stick to the facts and remind yourself to stay calm.
      If she tries to shift the conversation to you, you can respond by saying something like, “I know that you don’t agree with everything that I do and I will be happy to talk about those things with you later. Right now though, I’m really concerned about your safety.”

      4
      Tell your friend that you are concerned about her drug use. Of course, this is much easier said than done, however having this conversation is very important. Be sure to bring up the topic in a nonjudgmental way. Always begin the conversation by letting your friend know that you are concerned about her. You want her to know that you are genuinely concerned for her well-being.[4] Use statements that are respectful but also clearly communicate your concern.
      For example, you could say, “Cheney, I’m here right now because I’m worried about you.”
      You might also say “Jenna, I’m concerned that you’re smoking marijuana. You’re important to me and I’m concerned about the impact that your smoking is having on your life…”
      Avoid critical and judgmental statements like “I’m so disgusted with you, Cheney.”

      5
      Identify the negative consequences. Focus on concrete and nonjudgmental statements that reflect your experiences with her behavior. Don’t discuss what other people may feel or have said because that is often unproductive. Also, avoid making generalizations such as “Everyone thinks that you have a problem.” Stick to the facts as you have experienced them.
      Use statements that your friend cannot dispute. For example, you might say, “You left the party with two people that you did not know yesterday. I am very concerned for your safety.”
      Always distinguish between your friend as a person and her behavior. Focus on what behaviors your friend is engaging in and not on her as a person. Avoid statements like, “You’re so irresponsible” or “You’re such a bad influence for your children.”
      Emphasize the difference between her sober behavior and behavior that occurs when she is not sober. For example, you could say “You are always so adventurous and I love that about you. But when you use drugs, you often do very risky and dangerous things.”


      6
      Give your friend information. Your friend may not see drugs as a bad thing, so sharing scientific information may help open her eyes. Once your friend is aware of how much drugs affect her brain, body, life, and relationships, she may be more inclined to stop using on her own.
      You should do research on drugs before talking to your friend so that you have the scientific information available during the conversation.
      Do not accuse or berate your friend. Just share the information in a respectful way. For example, you could say, “Did you know that mollies can cause you to have a seizure? It can also cause your heart to beat abnormally.

      Encourage your friend to seek treatment. Advise her to talk to a professional or give her some literature to read. Let her know that you’d be willing to go with her to an appointment or you can volunteer to accompany her to visit treatment facilities. If your friend knows that she has your support, she may be more open to treatment.
      Offer support for your friend. Knowing exactly how to offer support her can be a little tricky because your friend may not want to hear what you have to say. The drugs are likely impacting her mind and she may have fallen in with a rough circle of friends. However, here are some ways that you can support your friend.
      Listen to your friend. If she confides in you, be sure to listen in a nonjudgmental way. It’s probably hard for your friend to open up about her drug use.
      THANK YOU for listening.
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      Drugs are for mugs
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      There will be things that you do that your friends don't like, its the way of the world.
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      Don't be a pussy
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      (Original post by Anonymous)
      Hi I need help on this subject..

      My mate loves drugs but I don't. And I think our friendship may be breaking up to them realising how much I actually hate drugs. I know that people have got amazing personalities I just don't like the sort how it affects your body. That's what worries me when my friend takes it, I just get concerned about them, and their health? But they don't think I hate drugs cause of that reason...

      Idk what to do, please any advice would be the very best!!!

      Thank you

      Sorry, but you should stay away from anybody doing drugs even if they are your best mate.

      This is because these people will do anything and everything to get drugs. For that reason they make lousy friends. They will probably manage to mess up your life too like they have their own if you let them.

      Not to mention you are going to feel like crap everytime you help them and it gets thrown back in your face, which in most cases it will.

      I'd cut ties with this friend. You don't need that kind of trouble in your life.
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      (Original post by princess kimber)
      Sorry, but you should stay away from anybody doing drugs even if they are your best mate.

      This is because these people will do anything and everything to get drugs. For that reason they make lousy friends. They will probably manage to mess up your life too like they have their own if you let them.

      Not to mention you are going to feel like crap everytime you help them and it gets thrown back in your face, which in most cases it will.

      I'd cut ties with this friend. You don't need that kind of trouble in your life.
      Hmm i have to disagree with you on this, this statement sounds like something straight out of a government endorsed phseec lesson. hard drugs like heroin or meth and coke at a push may lead to something like this due to there highly addicting qualities but the odd pinger, 10 bag, ket and acid things like that really arent addictive and just offer something different to alcohol, something which ruins far more lives than the 4 drugs i just mentioned, support your mate and tell him drugs all the time will take there tole, ensure he reads talk to frank help pages and if he is taking pingers (ecstasy) that he goes on pills report and only ever take one that has been documented on there. you dont want to lose a friend over something most if not all teenagers do just support him. but never feel pressured to do them yourself
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      I lost a LOT of friends who turned into complete drug fiends. In my experience people who take drugs regularly become selfish and so fixated on drug taking that they aren’t people you would want to be friends with anyway.
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      (Original post by princess kimber)
      Sorry, but you should stay away from anybody doing drugs even if they are your best mate.

      This is because these people will do anything and everything to get drugs. For that reason they make lousy friends. They will probably manage to mess up your life too like they have their own if you let them.

      Not to mention you are going to feel like crap everytime you help them and it gets thrown back in your face, which in most cases it will.

      I'd cut ties with this friend. You don't need that kind of trouble in your life.
      I don't agree with this, not all people are like this. My friend did drugs and he knew I didn't like them so he never brought me into his problems and we stayed good friends. He's even started to quit drugs now.
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      (Original post by djballer)
      Hmm i have to disagree with you on this, this statement sounds like something straight out of a government endorsed phseec lesson. hard drugs like heroin or meth and coke at a push may lead to something like this due to there highly addicting qualities but the odd pinger, 10 bag, ket and acid things like that really arent addictive and just offer something different to alcohol, something which ruins far more lives than the 4 drugs i just mentioned, support your mate and tell him drugs all the time will take there tole, ensure he reads talk to frank help pages and if he is taking pingers (ecstasy) that he goes on pills report and only ever take one that has been documented on there. you dont want to lose a friend over something most if not all teenagers do just support him. but never feel pressured to do them yourself
      Bull.

      Both can mess up your life and kill you.

      It doesn't matter and is irrelevant which are more addictive. They are dangerous. Drugs can literally kill you after one dose. Alcohol takes much longer.

      People abusing both of these (drugs and alcohol) can drag people who love them down along with them and risk loosing everything they have, their jobs, their families, their health and their life. They often refuse to help themselves and make their friends and families pay the price. It's not nice watching someone go from bad to worse and refusing your help and you have to sit back and watch knowing they are going to be dead soon and there isn't much you can do.

      Of course, not all are like this. Some people really do want help and will take it. Some take it when it's too late. Some may just be the occasional user but again are still putting themselves at risk. What happens when they have a life problem they can't deal with in the future? They'd probably increase their usage.. leading to abuse. Of course some take help, But a lot do not, because there is an underlying problem, a root cause they have to take control of first. But there is a reason why drugs destroys so many and that's because it makes people selfish, it has made people care more about themselves and these kind of people will rob their own granny to get there next fix. You can't trust them, rely on them or even believe a word they say as they will say and do anything and always put the drugs first. These are the ones you cannot help. Unless they want to help THEMSELVES then you can work with that.
     
     
     
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