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    So I got my assessment grade back for one of the books I’m doing in eng lot, and I got a grade 5... tbh I rly disappointed in tha because I actually worked for it and thought I did well. Does anyone have any tips for English literature revision? Because that is honestly something I can’t do... 😣 thanks!
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    (Original post by Berrydo)
    So I got my assessment grade back for one of the books I’m doing in eng lot, and I got a grade 5... tbh I rly disappointed in tha because I actually worked for it and thought I did well. Does anyone have any tips for English literature revision? Because that is honestly something I can’t do... 😣 thanks!
    Remember PEE point evidence explanation
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    (Original post by choco_monsterxo)
    Remember PEE point evidence explanation
    Yeh thanks 🙏 tbh that is something I can do but I just don’t know where I’m losing marks... I think it’s the information.
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    (Original post by Berrydo)
    Yeh thanks 🙏 tbh that is something I can do but I just don’t know where I’m losing marks... I think it’s the information.
    Possibly lack of explanation. if u want u can PM me an eg of ur work. I got a B at GCSE for lit
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    Know how to explain your quotes well and know what they mean is my tip, also look at some of your class mates that are doing well and see what they write. That will help you understand some of the difference and may help you achive a higher grade.
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    this ain’t really revision help but more exam help but my teacher says PEACE paragraphs are better than PEE for higher level (point evidence analysis context evaluation) or PETER (point evidence technique explanation reader)
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    It sounds simple, but you need to know the book really well. For example, I think loads of people would find it really easy to write an essay about Harry Potter if they revised the quotes because they love the books and the characters and are just so familiar with them.

    English literature revision is the complete opposite of any kind of maths and science revision - you can't learn everything they will throw at you. In a maths exam, you know what topics will be on paper - there are bound to be quadratics and simultaneous equations etc. So it can be quite daunting to revise for a paper in which they could ask you to analyse something you have never thought about before.

    Revising Efficiently
    Whatever book you are studying, read it regularly and use thin post-it notes to mark pages with the best quotes and quotes that can be applied to multiple themes. Make mind-maps of quotes and ideas per theme. These will either a) help because you have revised the specific theme/character they are asking about or b) help because in making these you learned the book really well and can answer questions about something else. Approach it with an open mind. Then, once you feel you know the book really well, start looking anywhere you can for practice questions on your set text.

    General Tips
    Some good acronyms (some you may have heard of...)
    PEAR - Point, Example/Quote, Analyse and Alternative Interpretation, Relevant because... (link back to point)
    SKITTLES - Summary, Knowledge, Imagery, Themes, Tone, Language, Effect on the reader, Structure

    Examiners love their alternative interpretations - if you can effectively justify your point and it is unusual and outside the box, it will make your essay stand out.

    Comment on words and phrases rather than sections - sometimes focus in and make a big point about subtle details.

    Research SHC (Social Historical Context) so you can comment on what the writer might have been alluding to - for example, Macbeth was written at a time where there were a lot of people who did not like the King of England and were plotting against him (including the gunpowder plot) - it is no accident Shakespeare wrote about the downfall of someone who murders their King.

    Before starting any essay, it is a good idea to devote 5-10 minutes planning it. It sounds risky but is honestly so helpful - you get all your ideas and the structure together before starting the essay and you don't end up with a mid-exam panic because you have run out of ideas.

    I hope that helps a little! Good luck!
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    (Original post by JemmaSimmons)
    It sounds simple, but you need to know the book really well. For example, I think loads of people would find it really easy to write an essay about Harry Potter if they revised the quotes because they love the books and the characters and are just so familiar with them.

    English literature revision is the complete opposite of any kind of maths and science revision - you can't learn everything they will throw at you. In a maths exam, you know what topics will be on paper - there are bound to be quadratics and simultaneous equations etc. So it can be quite daunting to revise for a paper in which they could ask you to analyse something you have never thought about before.

    Revising Efficiently
    Whatever book you are studying, read it regularly and use thin post-it notes to mark pages with the best quotes and quotes that can be applied to multiple themes. Make mind-maps of quotes and ideas per theme. These will either a) help because you have revised the specific theme/character they are asking about or b) help because in making these you learned the book really well and can answer questions about something else. Approach it with an open mind. Then, once you feel you know the book really well, start looking anywhere you can for practice questions on your set text.

    General Tips
    Some good acronyms (some you may have heard of...)
    PEAR - Point, Example/Quote, Analyse and Alternative Interpretation, Relevant because... (link back to point)
    SKITTLES - Summary, Knowledge, Imagery, Themes, Tone, Language, Effect on the reader, Structure

    Examiners love their alternative interpretations - if you can effectively justify your point and it is unusual and outside the box, it will make your essay stand out.

    Comment on words and phrases rather than sections - sometimes focus in and make a big point about subtle details.

    Research SHC (Social Historical Context) so you can comment on what the writer might have been alluding to - for example, Macbeth was written at a time where there were a lot of people who did not like the King of England and were plotting against him (including the gunpowder plot) - it is no accident Shakespeare wrote about the downfall of someone who murders their King.

    Before starting any essay, it is a good idea to devote 5-10 minutes planning it. It sounds risky but is honestly so helpful - you get all your ideas and the structure together before starting the essay and you don't end up with a mid-exam panic because you have run out of ideas.

    I hope that helps a little! Good luck!
    Wow thanks for spending your time doing this! Honestly, thanks so much!! I do know the text very very well I must say because I love the book we r doing! Also, I do plan which does rly help!! I only got my grade back not my paper so I’m not sure what I’m wrong on... but yeh the revision tips r rly good thanks!! So mind mapping the key idea/info right?
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    (Original post by Berrydo)
    Wow thanks for spending your time doing this! Honestly, thanks so much!! I do know the text very very well I must say because I love the book we r doing! Also, I do plan which does rly help!! I only got my grade back not my paper so I’m not sure what I’m wrong on... but yeh the revision tips r rly good thanks!! So mind mapping the key idea/info right?
    Sorry haha, I was worried I might be telling you stuff you already know! Yeah, mindmaps of themes and characters can be really useful, especially if you know and love the book.
 
 
 

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