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    I will be applying to do either the BSc Psychology or BSc Psychology with Counselling to start in February.

    As they are both BPS accredited I intended to make my choice of course based on module choices. Largely I would chose the modules which are tied to the Psychology and Counselling degree even if I were to register on the straight Psychology module - the only difference was that I would have selected the Childhood Psychology option at Level 1. However since this module does not run in February and I would have to take 'Introducing the Social Sciences' D102 anyway I would basically end up studying the exact same modules which are compulsory for the Psychology and Counselling degree.

    My question is which is likely to be viewed as the better option by employers? Are there any other benefits to taking one or the other?

    My intention is to use this degree eventually to work in mental health setting, ideally to go on to train as a clinical psychologist (the end goal is a long way off and this is my first step!)
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    (Original post by jadedanby)
    I will be applying to do either the BSc Psychology or BSc Psychology with Counselling to start in February.

    As they are both BPS accredited I intended to make my choice of course based on module choices. Largely I would chose the modules which are tied to the Psychology and Counselling degree even if I were to register on the straight Psychology module - the only difference was that I would have selected the Childhood Psychology option at Level 1. However since this module does not run in February and I would have to take 'Introducing the Social Sciences' D102 anyway I would basically end up studying the exact same modules which are compulsory for the Psychology and Counselling degree.

    My question is which is likely to be viewed as the better option by employers? Are there any other benefits to taking one or the other?

    My intention is to use this degree eventually to work in mental health setting, ideally to go on to train as a clinical psychologist (the end goal is a long way off and this is my first step!)
    If your end goal is to become a clinical psychologist (which requires a PhD), I think you'd be better off doing the BSc Psychology because it has more module options in level 2 and 3 (and one of the modules seems to be research based, which is ideal for postgraduate preparation).
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    I am doing BSc (Hons) Psychology and I know that is BPS accredited, but I heard that the one with counselling is not accredited so I would super double check with that! The Psychology degree gives you more choice though. You can study forensics and counselling together in the final year(s). You can study mental health, children, sports psychology, abnormal psychology etc. It has more choice than the Forensic or Counselling degree and kind of covers those two degrees within it. It even covers social science.

    If you wish to be a clinical psychologist (which I believe is more about diagnosing mental health issues and referring to other professionals (not medication though) rather than providing therapy specifically), then the BSc Psychology would be better imo. People tend to do the Counselling one if they wish to be a therapist/counsellor which is a lower level job compared to a licensed Psychologist, which usually requires a masters degree and then a licensing exam.

    (Original post by jadedanby)
    I will be applying to do either the BSc Psychology or BSc Psychology with Counselling to start in February.

    As they are both BPS accredited I intended to make my choice of course based on module choices. Largely I would chose the modules which are tied to the Psychology and Counselling degree even if I were to register on the straight Psychology module - the only difference was that I would have selected the Childhood Psychology option at Level 1. However since this module does not run in February and I would have to take 'Introducing the Social Sciences' D102 anyway I would basically end up studying the exact same modules which are compulsory for the Psychology and Counselling degree.

    My question is which is likely to be viewed as the better option by employers? Are there any other benefits to taking one or the other?

    My intention is to use this degree eventually to work in mental health setting, ideally to go on to train as a clinical psychologist (the end goal is a long way off and this is my first step!)
 
 
 
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