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What political party do you support and why? Watch

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    (Original post by Danny the Geezer)
    Because Corbyn tried to tap into their psyche by going to Glastonbury and proclaiming himself as the new God of grime etc, and also promising the tuition fee abolition (which he was never ever going to afford).

    He lost the election, nevertheless, because older, possibly more wiser people saw through it. Yes, he did get a large proportion of the youth vote but he marketed himself (ultimately, unsuccessfully) towards this votergroup.

    Lol this is such bs. Older people are wiser because they didn't vote Labour? Well the majority of young people must be very very wise because they rejected austerity, a weak and wobbly govt. propped up by DUP, a campaign focused on Brexit and NOTHING else (look at their 2017 manifesto, it offered nothing worth voting for), which by the way, is a joke, seeing as the PM wanted to remain in the EU.

    It was recently announced that interest rates would be put up for the first time in years, inflation also up time and time again, meanwhile wages are not improving. What does this mean? The cost of living is becoming more and more un-affordable every single day. We've seen U-turns left, right and centre (dementia tax), the chancellor tried to break a manifesto PLEDGE (something you should never, ever EVER do) by raising NI contributions for self-employed workers.

    But broken promises are nothing new with the Conservatives, are they? Just to refresh you, the Tories promised to match Labour spending in 2007 if they were elected. What happened after Cameron, like the snake he is, saw Obama's success with blaming the global banking crisis (yes, BANKING crisis, not "Labour" crisis, but I'm sure you're smarter than most voters sadly were in 2010) and therefore adopted the same policy of blaming the opposition for something they didn't cause. Following on from this, we've seen a promise not to increase VAT, yet 1 year after election (2011) VAT was increased to 20%. A promise to clear the deficit after the first parliament (2015), which was broken.

    If this wasn't enough, let's talk corruption. There is political deadlock at Stormont, so the Tories are now making decisions for Northern Ireland from Westminster, which might I remind you, is working with the DUP. Therefore the DUP effectively has a say in how Northern Ireland is governed, while Sin Feinn don't - despite neither party having a majority.

    And more recently, two cabinet minsters resigning for corruption.

    Thank god younger people were smart.
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    Labour because I believe in social equality and opportunity for all.
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    I flip flop from Lib Dem to Labour. I consider myself a social democrat, so I believe in a mixed economy: free market with regulations and interventions where needed.
    Higher taxation on corporations to pay for public services, because frankly, our public services cannot take anymore austerity.
    No one is born on a level playing field and I (unfortunately) still believe our society is not completely meritocratic , so I believe it's the government's duty to correct this with their polices to encourage equality of opportunity.
    Strong trade unions
    public ownership of some industries such as rail, energy etc
    I'm on the fence on tuition fees, because studies show that free HE, Scotland and the past shows it hinders participation in HE. I definitely think interest rates on student loans need to be lowered or scrapped, maintenance grants need to be reintroduced and the rate at which you start paying loans back needs to be increased.
    The war on drugs needs to be cancelled. Rehabilitate, not punish. Legalise, regulate and tax weed, while decriminalise other drugs.
    Oh, and cancel Brexit, or at least give the public a say on the final deal
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    Labour because out of all the parties they are the one who have my interests at best of heart. I have no reason to support the Conservative party as their interests completely conflict with mine and the lib dems aren't strong enough as a party.
    The conservatives have proved over the past year that their party is a complete shambles and I cannot wait to be rid of them. It's an embarrassment. No party is perfect but the conservatives are in shambles
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    (Original post by Danny the Geezer)
    OK. But I'd rather vote for any UKIP leader than a deluded old twit who supports open borders. They instigated Brexit and to me that was a glorious thing. Next let's leave the Commonwealth :yy:
    Lol, I thought UKIP loved the Commonwealth though?

    And what purpose could leaving it possible serve?
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    I don't believe in party identification and as a young person I feel a responsibility to be particularly critical towards every party. I think Labour is idealistic but in practice it doesn't seem to work - although I'd fully support the abolition of tuition fees, in interviews post-election Corbyn, however, did a complete u-turn. I voted for the Conservatives BUT that doesn't mean I agree with all of their policies and I thought their campaign was a shambles.
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    I have no party alignment and would be comfortable voting Labour under Corbyn, for UKIP under Farage, Conservatives under May etc.
    I also have no specific ideological stances and think most peoples views boil down to our socialisation and there agreement and/or reaction to their parents views.

    I think more than anything I see advantages from every type of potential economic and social policy initiative that's implemented.
    In part I believe most people have been indoctrinated by the idea of a political spectrum and have a pseudo-conviction for their beliefs.
    If I was to interview 10 people and follow a line of questioning to really understand what they believe and why, 9 or 10 would
    fundamentally not believe what they think they believe or it would not align well with who they vote for.

    Therefore I disagree with the British political system which forces a left and right consensus while most people believe in things across the 'spectrum' of political opinion. This forces Labour and the Conservatives to hit a centre ground and really be the exact same party. Even if Corbyn got into power his view would become marginalised and his 'Hard-Left' stance would be somewhat surpessed, then people would call him a 'traitor' and vote for the Conservatives the next election. Then it would go back to middle-ground politics until another Corbyn arises then the same etc.

    You see the point.
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    I support Affinity beacause they will put democracy and the people above benefiting from a corrupt system that appears impossible to break away from.
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    None, they're all manned by a bunch of wrinkly old piss bags who couldn't give a toss for anything except for how much they should roger the tax payer for.
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    (Original post by Bornblue)
    Considering the current and likely future leadership of the Tories, it really doesn't seem you have that much in common with them anymore.

    On what you post, you seem more of an orange booker, than someone aligned with the current Tory party.
    Possibly, but I'm hardly going to leave my party because of 18 months of lacklustre leadership by a relatively gentle version of the Tory right to join a party run by (yet another) faintly shambolic left-wing pensioner.
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    I prefer Lib Dem but I'd vote Labour if I felt they were more likely to win in my constituency.

    I'm not a fan of Corbyn or the people who have sought to turn the Labour party into a hard-left personality cult, that said, something needs to change. Neoliberalism has failed, millennials are in danger of becoming a lost generation. I would like to be able to afford to buy a flat, or rent and still be able to save - that is not possible under the Tories.

    (Original post by Bornblue)
    I'm surprised how right wing this place is, compared to the general student and young adult population.
    It isn't. D&CA =/= TSR as a whole. There's a large silent majority who really can't be bothered to argue about politics on a student forum.
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    (Original post by Kayleighm18)
    Are you labour, tory, libdem etc? And why
    I support the conservatives as I hate them less then I hate labour and I don’t see the point in voting a minor party as they can’t get in government.
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    (Original post by GovernmentEarner)
    I have no party alignment and would be comfortable voting Labour under Corbyn, for UKIP under Farage, Conservatives under May etc.
    I also have no specific ideological stances and think most peoples views boil down to our socialisation and there agreement and/or reaction to their parents views.

    I think more than anything I see advantages from every type of potential economic and social policy initiative that's implemented.
    In part I believe most people have been indoctrinated by the idea of a political spectrum and have a pseudo-conviction for their beliefs.
    If I was to interview 10 people and follow a line of questioning to really understand what they believe and why, 9 or 10 would
    fundamentally not believe what they think they believe or it would not align well with who they vote for.

    Therefore I disagree with the British political system which forces a left and right consensus while most people believe in things across the 'spectrum' of political opinion. This forces Labour and the Conservatives to hit a centre ground and really be the exact same party. Even if Corbyn got into power his view would become marginalised and his 'Hard-Left' stance would be somewhat surpessed, then people would call him a 'traitor' and vote for the Conservatives the next election. Then it would go back to middle-ground politics until another Corbyn arises then the same etc.

    You see the point.
    Most people agree with points across the spectrum however most people also grant more weight to core issues than average an entire manifesto.

    I'm sure there are some areas on which I agree with Labour or the Lib Dem's however I vote Tory because they are much more in tune with me on the economy and foreign policy.

    Indeed by allowing purists to lead a party you can actually restrict choice. I for example would have to vote Tory regardless of policy simply because I utterly despise what Corbyn wishes to do to my country, while although I did not vote for Miliband I had much more freedom because I would have been reasonably comfortable with his victory.
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    (Original post by Snufflesxo)
    I flip flop from Lib Dem to Labour. I consider myself a social democrat, so I believe in a mixed economy: free market with regulations and interventions where needed.
    Higher taxation on corporations to pay for public services, because frankly, our public services cannot take anymore austerity.
    No one is born on a level playing field and I (unfortunately) still believe our society is not completely meritocratic , so I believe it's the government's duty to correct this with their polices to encourage equality of opportunity.
    Strong trade unions
    public ownership of some industries such as rail, energy etc
    I'm on the fence on tuition fees, because studies show that free HE, Scotland and the past shows it hinders participation in HE. I definitely think interest rates on student loans need to be lowered or scrapped, maintenance grants need to be reintroduced and the rate at which you start paying loans back needs to be increased.
    The war on drugs needs to be cancelled. Rehabilitate, not punish. Legalise, regulate and tax weed, while decriminalise other drugs.
    Oh, and cancel Brexit, or at least give the public a say on the final deal
    This is basically me also but also because the conservatives haven't done anything to address the issues that are currently facing our country, lack of housing, Low productivity, unstable employment, the absolute fiasco of Universal Credit
    Their 7 year austerity experiment has been show time and time again not to be working as was intended and yet they continue with it which means they are either incompetent or they have ulterior motives behind it
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    I support Jeremy.
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    Corbyn is just trying to be another Bernie Sanders, the two need to go back to the mental asylum where they belong
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    Monster raving loony party.

    In all seriousness; I'm not old enough to vote so it doesn't really matter. The tories are falling apart from within and are looking more incompetent by the day. Labour looks set to win the next election at the rate things are going. There's no party I'd particularly "Identify" with. Anybody BUT the conservatives, probably labour.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Neoliberalism has failed
    Boo to that. Neoliberalism means you're not dying at 40 in a puddle of pig-****.
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    (Original post by dickwhittington)
    This is basically me also but also because the conservatives haven't done anything to address the issues that are currently facing our country, lack of housing, Low productivity, unstable employment, the absolute fiasco of Universal Credit
    Things have been done about housing, but they're the wrong things. In terms of productivity growth, there's certainly been activity - a pretty big focus on innovation, those huge increases in the AIA, City Deals and so on - in reality, a reduction in productivity was always going to occur where there were significant increases in employment.

    Universal Credit has been a bit of a fiasco, but that was always going to be the case with anything so ambitious.

    Their 7 year austerity experiment has been show time and time again not to be working as was intended and yet they continue with it which means they are either incompetent or they have ulterior motives behind it
    Let's face it though, there's hardly been any true "austerity". It was given a half-hearted attempt at the very start of Osborne's time in office and quickly dumped.

    People are just using that tag ideologically to refer to any period where public spending is not increasing vastly ahead of inflation. Even reducing the deficit has still involved us spending quite considerably - we're only beginning to get the current account deficit under control.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Boo to that. Neoliberalism means you're not dying at 40 in a puddle of pig-****.
    I'd hardly call the NHS an example of neoliberalism.
 
 
 
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