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    Hello,

    I'm starting a PhD in a new area (materials engineering for aerospace applications), I was wondering whether anyone knows of any good resources I can use to 'teach myself' fluid dynamics and aerodynamics to a fairly advanced level?

    I'm totally comfortable with the maths sides of things, as it stands, it's just finding content in orderly sorts of formats.
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    (Original post by Infraspecies)
    Hello,

    I'm starting a PhD in a new area (materials engineering for aerospace applications), I was wondering whether anyone knows of any good resources I can use to 'teach myself' fluid dynamics and aerodynamics to a fairly advanced level?

    I'm totally comfortable with the maths sides of things, as it stands, it's just finding content in orderly sorts of formats.
    Are you confident in low Reynolds number fluid dynamics and high Reynolds number fluid dynamics?

    Both areas go really deep especially at low Reynolds numbers the maths gets crazy.
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    (Original post by trapking)
    Are you confident in low Reynolds number fluid dynamics and high Reynolds number fluid dynamics?

    Both areas go really deep especially at low Reynolds numbers the maths gets crazy.
    I know what they are, and that they correspond to laminar and turbulent flows respectively. Is that all the whole area boils down to, the various expression of Reynolds numbers? For example, predicting flow velocity around high speed complex curvature objects?
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    (Original post by Infraspecies)
    I know what they are, and that they correspond to laminar and turbulent flows respectively. Is that all the whole area boils down to, the various expression of Reynolds numbers? For example, predicting flow velocity around high speed complex curvature objects?
    That's just at the surface level but it goes deeper. For example at low Reynolds numbers inertia forces become invalid and you start to focus only on the viscous forces. You then start to look at the actual properties of the fluids and it very much becomes hydrodynamics because the fluids start behaving in very strange ways. Newtons law of viscosity starts to be applied and you look at stress and strain tensors.

    In other words it becomes very difficult to predict stuff like flow velocity and software has to be used like COMSOL etc.
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    (Original post by trapking)
    That's just at the surface level but it goes deeper. For example at low Reynolds numbers inertia forces become invalid and you start to focus only on the viscous forces. You then start to look at the actual properties of the fluids and it very much becomes hydrodynamics because the fluids start behaving in very strange ways. Newtons law of viscosity starts to be applied and you look at stress and strain tensors.

    In other words it becomes very difficult to predict stuff like flow velocity and software has to be used like COMSOL etc.
    Of course software needs to be used, but the laws and equations (Navier-Stokes, for example) that you're iteratively solving or however the program is working, it's just the theoretical overview that I'm looking to pin down of those sorts of areas.

    So, in order to do that, you'd suggest the order of Reynolds numbers and associated equations, Newtons laws of viscosity... and beyond?
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    (Original post by Infraspecies)
    Of course software needs to be used, but the laws and equations (Navier-Stokes, for example) that you're iteratively solving or however the program is working, it's just the theoretical overview that I'm looking to pin down of those sorts of areas.

    So, in order to do that, you'd suggest the order of Reynolds numbers and associated equations, Newtons laws of viscosity... and beyond?
    Yes! There's a book I was given I'll try and find it and let you know. It was PhD level fluid dynamics.
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    (Original post by Infraspecies)
    Hello,

    I'm starting a PhD in a new area (materials engineering for aerospace applications), I was wondering whether anyone knows of any good resources I can use to 'teach myself' fluid dynamics and aerodynamics to a fairly advanced level?

    I'm totally comfortable with the maths sides of things, as it stands, it's just finding content in orderly sorts of formats.
    You wont really need CFD for materials engineering. It will only really be calculations to work out the force exerted on a material
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    (Original post by damn daniel yeah)
    You wont really need CFD for materials engineering. It will only really be calculations to work out the force exerted on a material
    I'm aware of this, it's for extracurricular reasons.

    Thanks for you input though.
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    (Original post by Infraspecies)
    I'm aware of this, it's for extracurricular reasons.

    Thanks for you input though.
    ah okay i see i have looked for them for similar reasons and they all want either charge a fee of like £30 a month or like proper ones seem to charge £7000
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    (Original post by damn daniel yeah)
    ah okay i see i have looked for them for similar reasons and they all want either charge a fee of like £30 a month or like proper ones seem to charge £7000
    That's not really what I'm looking for.
 
 
 
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