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Does wearing a poppy glorify war? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Will you wear a poppy for remembrance day?
    Definitely, it shows respect
    732
    43.94%
    Yes, it's expected of me
    149
    8.94%
    No, I remember in other ways
    503
    30.19%
    No, it glorifies war
    282
    16.93%

    • TSR Community Team
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    Ahead of Remembrance Day on 11 November, there have been reports that a third of young people will refuse to wear a poppy as 'it glorifies war'.

    Do you agree? Will you be wearing a poppy?
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    No it doesn't.
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    I am against wars, but I think it is important to wear one to remember those who have died.
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    (Original post by BlinkyBill)
    Ahead of Remembrance Day on 11 November, there have been reports that a third of young people will refuse to wear a poppy as 'it glorifies war'.

    Do you agree? Will you be wearing a poppy?
    Young people can be ignorant idiots.

    Its an anti war statement if anything.

    Very click baity by TSR again.
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    *grabs popcorn*
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    Seems a third of young people are idiots. Poppys are to remember those who died in war on any side. It's a mark of respect for the dead, not a call to arms. I will be wearing mine.
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    I wear mine and remember that a lot of the people that fought in the wars had no choice, so we should remember their deaths.
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    Too much left wing indoctrination in the education system. I haven't seen many muslims or immigrants wearing them or even young british people. It tends to only be the elderly british who where them who probably lived in that period or had relatives who fought.
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    I will wear mine. It’s a mark of respect for the sacrifices.
    Unlike the views of some that have been posted, it’s far more than “a crappy piece of paper”
    It doesn’t glorify war in the slightest
    Perhaps those who refuse should remember that the freedoms they have today stem from those sacrifices
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    If I were in Europe, I would wear one. It's a respectful gesture towards the people who were killed in the war, whether or not you believe in war as a principle or not.

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    Of course it doesn't glorify war. I will admit I don't wear them throughout November but I will wear one on 11th November, if I have one. I wear them because it's expected (yeah, I know) but I still like to remember the soldiers who fought for my freedom at points throughout the year too. I don't think you need to necessarily wear a poppy to remember them but it's respectful so if I have one, I will. Again, the statement that poppies "glorify war" is really stupid.
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    I probably won't be wearing one - I donated money to the cause (about £5 - so more than the cost of a poppy) but I don't want to wear one. For one thing, I don't think we need to wear one to show respect, and I choose to show respect in other ways, such as actually caring all year around, not just on the one day.

    I also don't agree with the concept of just remembering British soldiers, as seems to be the norm - if I'm going to participate then I choose to remember everyone who has ever died in a way, whether they be on our side or not. I feel like wearing a poppy is too much of a British thing (which makes little sense, but hear me out). When we're confronted with atrocity, I think it's more important to remember that more than our own soldiers have died. Civilians die too, in the crossfire. We have blown countless Syrian families up.

    So no, I won't be wearing a poppy, and I feel a bit dubious about giving money to the British Legion, even though I do to help the charity. That money does go to the army, in some form, and I don't want to be funding them at all. I may support those who have fallen, but I will never support our current army and the work they do. It's murder, pure and simple, whoever's on the other end of the gun.
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    (Original post by EllieCeeJay)
    I probably won't be wearing one - I donated money to the cause (about £5 - so more than the cost of a poppy) but I don't want to wear one. For one thing, I don't think we need to wear one to show respect, and I choose to show respect in other ways, such as actually caring all year around, not just on the one day.

    I also don't agree with the concept of just remembering British soldiers, as seems to be the norm - if I'm going to participate then I choose to remember everyone who has ever died in a way, whether they be on our side or not. I feel like wearing a poppy is too much of a British thing (which makes little sense, but hear me out). When we're confronted with atrocity, I think it's more important to remember that more than our own soldiers have died. Civilians die too, in the crossfire. We have blown countless Syrian families up.

    So no, I won't be wearing a poppy, and I feel a bit dubious about giving money to the British Legion, even though I do to help the charity. That money does go to the army, in some form, and I don't want to be funding them at all. I may support those who have fallen, but I will never support our current army and the work they do. It's murder, pure and simple, whoever's on the other end of the gun.
    But living in Britain you’re happy to take advantage of the freedoms you have as a result of the previous world wars. And I assume you would never ever wish for our forces to defend your life if such a scenario happens again
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    (Original post by Sammylou40)
    But living in Britain you’re happy to take advantage of the freedoms you have as a result of the previous world wars. And I assume you would never ever wish for our forces to defend your life if such a scenario happens again
    I would rather we didn't have an army at all. I know it's not possible, but it's my personal belief. I take advantage of the freedoms I have as a result of the previous world wars and I try to consider ALL sacrifices made, not just ones that came as a result of our armed forces. There were many people that died on our soil helping our cause too - where's their two minutes silence? Where's the two minutes silence for holocaust victims, and victims of the Russian regime in the 1900's?

    If armies were abolished, across the globe (wishful thinking, I know), the scenario wouldn't happen again. But for every second we have nuclear weapons, and an army, and an air force, and a navy, we are both protecting and dooming our country. I will never condone the armed forces, and I will never consider them to be something we need.

    Everyone is entitled to their own opinion on this matter. Just because I live in this society that we have and I don't wear a poppy doesn't mean that I don't acknowledge sacrifices that people have made. It just means that I have a certain belief system that means that I don't wear a poppy
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    RBL, the charity that benefits from the poppy appeal each year, directly funds active military conflicts, as well as supporting (UK) veterans. I think it's a bit of a stretch to say this is "glorifying war", but all the same, there are arguably better charities out there to be donating your money to.

    I don't care that much what other people do, but RBL won't receive a penny of my money.
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    If our men had not fought in those two world wars, and we had just given in to the opposition, the modern world would be a very different place - Hitler would have won, perhaps purging all Jews and other races (or anyone without blonde hair and blue eyes), imposing a totalitarian regime on every country...
    Yes, war is a horrible thing. But sometimes it is the lesser of the evils; wearing a poppy remembers those who gave up their lives to allow us to live in this world today, where the main topic of conversation is "does wearing a poppy glorify war?" - not "how can I escape from a concentration camp?".
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      (Original post by Capitata)
      If our men had not fought in those two world wars, and we had just given in to the opposition, the modern world would be a very different place

      Hitler would have won, perhaps purging all Jews and other races (or anyone without blonde hair and blue eyes), imposing a totalitarian regime on every country...
      If the war had gone better, their plan was to send all the European Jews off to Madagascar or Siberia. The Nazis wanted to remove Jews and a large proportion of slavs from Europe, and they didn't particularly care how.

      I don't think they particularly had plans for the rest of the world, I think they were pretty happy for Britain to continue to genocide Africans and Indians - no country has committed as much genocide as Britain did constructing the British Empire.

      The final solution was because they realised Britain would not surrender soon, and the USSR had stopped collapsing and was fighting back.

      If you remember, this is what got Ken Livingstone into trouble.
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      (Original post by EllieCeeJay)
      I probably won't be wearing one - I donated money to the cause (about £5 - so more than the cost of a poppy) but I don't want to wear one. For one thing, I don't think we need to wear one to show respect, and I choose to show respect in other ways, such as actually caring all year around, not just on the one day.

      I also don't agree with the concept of just remembering British soldiers, as seems to be the norm - if I'm going to participate then I choose to remember everyone who has ever died in a way, whether they be on our side or not. I feel like wearing a poppy is too much of a British thing (which makes little sense, but hear me out). When we're confronted with atrocity, I think it's more important to remember that more than our own soldiers have died. Civilians die too, in the crossfire. We have blown countless Syrian families up.

      So no, I won't be wearing a poppy, and I feel a bit dubious about giving money to the British Legion, even though I do to help the charity. That money does go to the army, in some form, and I don't want to be funding them at all. I may support those who have fallen, but I will never support our current army and the work they do. It's murder, pure and simple, whoever's on the other end of the gun.
      I couldn't have said it better myself. You've obviously thought this through very well!
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      No, annual remembrance arose from the utter human catastrophe that was World War 1. That seemed to be the point at which war was viewed no longer as some jolly conquest but as a brutal (but sometimes necessary) endeavour. Larkin's 'MCMXIV' really struck me and captures this idea perfectly, well worth a read.
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      The poppy remembers those who have fallen in war, not the actual war
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