Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Does wearing a poppy glorify war? Watch

Announcements
  • View Poll Results: Will you wear a poppy for remembrance day?
    Definitely, it shows respect
    732
    43.91%
    Yes, it's expected of me
    150
    9.00%
    No, I remember in other ways
    503
    30.17%
    No, it glorifies war
    282
    16.92%

    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Wearing one? no

    Some of the people who are adamant that everyone should wear one and anyone who doesn't is somehow a traitor/unpatriotic/etc? Most of them seem pretty keen on glorifying war (and are the main reason I've just donated without wearing one this year)
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Nah it doesn't glorify it. It's a reminder of all those who sacrificed and paid the ultimate price to protect our country and face tyranny head on.
    • Offline

      9
      (Original post by Fujoshi)
      I'm pretty sure that the Mongolian empire has the highest % of the population death toll (killing 10% of the global population at the time)? Russia also racked up a pretty high death toll with the USSR (with about 56-62 million 'unnatural deaths'). A quick search shows that the British empire helped cause a famine in india (by continuing to export food out of the country when Indians were starving) which killed between 12-29 million (other atrocities such as the early concentration camps they set up in Africa (mainly for (white) boers) and the numerous times they killing protesters tended to claim a couple thousand to a hundred thousand, see here: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...756.html%3famp). It's all equally terrible and inexcusable but I haven't found anything which shows that the British empire committed the most genocide? But if you have info which shows they did then please share it with us because frankly nothing is taught about the British empire in schools so it's pretty key to share this stuff + make it accssible to more people :3
      Native Americans
      Aboriginals
      Inuits
      Africans
      The Boers (we invented concentration camps to "deal" with them)
      Indians

      No other empire has been so successful in eliminating a race and replacing them with their own people. Not just forcefully integrating the locals, but wiping them out and replacing them.
      Offline

      10
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by looloo2134)
      Maybe we should increase the voting age to 26 and some form of National service. Not all young people are ignorant idiots plenty of young working class people join the armed services.
      As a 21 year old, I believe that increasing the voting age to 26 is ridiculous. We have Members of Parliament who are younger than 26 (Mhairi Black). Young people who are bought up in today's world are more politically aware and are more interested in current affairs.
      Offline

      13
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by AngeryPenguin)
      we invented concentration camps to "deal" with them
      Actually we didn't, but good try.
      Offline

      12
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by Drewski)
      You fund an organisation yet have no idea what it actually does. Doesn't that bother you?

      The money in no way goes to the Army. It goes to veterans and, in some cases, their families.


      The poppy as a symbol recognises all war dead. Allies and axis, combatant and non, military and civilian. The Poppy Appeal raises money towards former UK service personnel, yes, but conflating the two is your mistake, not the charity's.



      Oh, ok. So all those who are on peacekeeping duties for the UN in South Sudan, training the Afghan army to look after themselves, helping prevent further outbreaks of Ebola, conducting anti-piracy missions off the horn of Africa, working anti-drugs in the Caribbean, reacting to natural disasters all over the globe, helping police the skies for the Baltic states who don't have their own air forces, rescuing UK citizens when floods hit their towns and villages, providing emergency medical transport for the NHS, conducting long range search and rescue over millions of square miles of the Atlantic ocean ...to name but a few... are all things you can't support?

      Good to know.



      Does rather make me wonder what things you do support, though...





      Wear a poppy, don't wear a poppy. I couldn't care less (and for context, unlike everyone else here, I have served). BUT. Try to know what the hell you're talking about.
      Well, one thing's for sure, I don't support the army. I understand they do good work, but I don't condone what make up a large part of their actions. Yes, I am a pacifist. No, I will not support our army. The British Legion is a charity to support 'british armed forces'. I did donate money to them, as I understand they support ex-forces, but I am still wary because 'British Armed Forces' could mean anything. I don't want to support murder.
      Offline

      18
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by BlinkyBill)
      Ahead of Remembrance Day on 11 November, there have been reports that a third of young people will refuse to wear a poppy as 'it glorifies war'.

      Do you agree? Will you be wearing a poppy?
      I wear my poppy (or more often my poppy bracelet instead haha) as a mark of respect. My great great great uncle died in the first world war and since we share a birthday I feel a strange affinity with him. I always used to wear a poppy anyway, but since I found out about my relative, Remembrance Day has a new meaning to me. I remember him when I wear my poppy.
      Offline

      12
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by lalaland808)
      As a 21 year old, I believe that increasing the voting age to 26 is ridiculous. We have Members of Parliament who are younger than 26 (Mhairi Black). Young people who are bought up in today's world are more politically aware and are more interested in current affairs.
      Thank you! I'm seventeen, and I consider myself to be politically aware. I have strong political beliefs too - not being able to vote in the Referendum last year is something I'm still angry about to this day. If the voting age was raised to 26, we'd be facing a country where people with some of the strongest political views are simply being ignored.

      Also, if I was obligated to join the armed forces, I would consider that a breach of my rights as a British Citizen. I don't want anything to do with war, and I don't think anyone should have to join up - especially with a cause that goes against one of their most integral beliefs. Also, as I don't respond at all well to authority, I can't see forcing me into the armed forces going any way except pear-shaped.
      Offline

      12
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by 999tigger)
      What a load of naive twaddle. History shows us we every much need armed forces to protect us as the worlds a dangerous place and people are all too willing to attack the weak. the idea you think protecting the country is dooming it is a joke and without their existence you wouldnt have the freedom to post what you just did.
      I gladly accept and use that freedom to my full advantage. I am happy to hold my own personal beliefs, as much as we do need the army. I don't want to support most of the work they do because I am a pacifist. However, I do accept that they are needed. I will never yell about how we need to get rid of them, but I will never outwardly support them because I just don't. Maybe we should work towards world peace, rather than killing lots of people.
      Offline

      17
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by PQ)
      Wearing one? no

      Some of the people who are adamant that everyone should wear one and anyone who doesn't is somehow a traitor/unpatriotic/etc? Most of them seem pretty keen on glorifying war (and are the main reason I've just donated without wearing one this year)
      I agree. Can't stand the poppy police.
      Offline

      14
      ReputationRep:
      Wearing poppies doesn't glorify war. Poppies are worn to remember the fallen. The hope that is by wearing poppies, those millions who perished will be remembered for as long as we wear them. Wearing poppies does nothing of the kind of glorification of war which we see in countries which did glorify war: for instance, instead of ignoring disastrous military incompetence (such as after WW2 in the USSR), we acknowledge how tens of thousands of our own men were butchered by our officers (we commemorated the 100th anniversary of the Somme, the bloodiest day in British military history).
      Offline

      20
      ReputationRep:
      I don't wear a poppy because I don't feel the need to show my respects via sentimental gestures, my respect is given either way and it matters not to me whether other people realise that. The idea that it glorifies war is silly - the whole idea of remembrance is to pay respects to the fallen soldiers, who didn't go to war because they wanted to, but because it was compulsory.
      Offline

      12
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by AxSirlotl)
      Wearing poppies doesn't glorify war. Poppies are worn to remember the fallen. The hope that is by wearing poppies, those millions who perished will be remembered for as long as we wear them. Wearing poppies does nothing of the kind of glorification of war which we see in countries which did glorify war: for instance, instead of ignoring disastrous military incompetence (such as after WW2 in the USSR), we acknowledge how tens of thousands of our own men were butchered by our officers (we commemorated the 100th anniversary of the Somme, the bloodiest day in British military history).
      It was a pretty bloody day in Russian and German military history, too. Lots of people only focus on British fallen, and British soldiers, which I think is a pretty massive failing of how we go about the day at the moment. Also, it does disregard everyone that helped win wars back home, such as codebreakers, bomb makers, the Home Front. It shouldn't be just 'our own men'. What about everyone that has ever perished in a war, either through fighting, helping at home or being caught in the crossfire? They are just as much the fallen as soldiers.
      Offline

      20
      ReputationRep:
      Can these mad young people not just get one of those white poppies that symbolise pacifism? I would've thought that would make more sense as you get to be anti war without being seen as a massive ****.

      As for me, I sometimes throw the British legion fellas some dosh but I can never get the effing poppy to stay on for longer than 0.5 seconds so I'm not gonna bother with it. I've always found the faux pretending to care for only a day thing a bit weird tho. The minute silence is so fake feeling, I don't like it.
      Offline

      18
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by EllieCeeJay)
      Well, one thing's for sure, I don't support the army. I understand they do good work, but I don't condone what make up a large part of their actions. Yes, I am a pacifist. No, I will not support our army. The British Legion is a charity to support 'british armed forces'. I did donate money to them, as I understand they support ex-forces, but I am still wary because 'British Armed Forces' could mean anything. I don't want to support murder.
      Considering that the armed forces haven't been 'used' in conflict since the withdrawal from Afghanistan a few years ago, the "large part of their actions" you claim to dislike are exactly the missions I describe. The humanitarian, multi-national, life saving operations that nobody else is capable of.


      I know you're young, but if you consider yourself to be (or at least trying to be) politically aware, then you'll continue learning and realise a lot of what you're presenting as facts simply aren't.
      Offline

      18
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by lalaland808)
      Young people who are bought up in today's world are more politically aware and are more interested in current affairs.
      *Some.


      You don't have to look very far too find people - of all ages - who haven't got a clue.
      Offline

      12
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by Drewski)
      Considering that the armed forces haven't been 'used' in conflict since the withdrawal from Afghanistan a few years ago, the "large part of their actions" you claim to dislike are exactly the missions I describe. The humanitarian, multi-national, life-saving operations that nobody else is capable of.


      I know you're young, but if you consider yourself to be (or at least trying to be) politically aware, then you'll continue learning and realise a lot of what you're presenting as facts simply aren't.
      It is still a major part of their training, and it is their main function, at least from an outsiders perspective. One day, they will enter conflict again, that is undeniable. Those are the actions I described - granted, I wasn't aware that they don't currently 'fight'. One thing, though, with a depleted police force, I would suggest that a lot of people in the armed forces could help here.

      It's the concept of the army that I'm more against, I am aware that they do good things, but it's the concept. After all, charities do humanitarian, life-saving operations. And they aren't trained to kill people.
      Offline

      8
      ReputationRep:
      It's so disrespectful to not wear one and a 1/3rd of young people are clearly missing the point. People have given their lives for us, the least we can do is remember them. I'm not wearing it with one particular political view or another, I'm wearing it in thanks and remembrance to the men and women who had the balls to fight for their families and towns.
      • TSR Support Team
      Offline

      20
      ReputationRep:
      I can see how people could think it does. It is for soldiers who died in a war after all.
      The way I see it it's respecting the people involved rather than the war itself. Bit like how you could give money to help people stuck in a collapsed mine and still oppose mining. And if anything I think you could see it as a "never again" statement about how damaging war can be and why it is a bad thing.
      Wearing a daffodil isn't supporting cancer- it's respecting those who suffer it/ contributing to hopefully preventing it. You could see poppies in much the same way.

      I don't have a terribly strong view on the mater though. I have supported it previously by selling poppies and will get one if I see them being sold. I'm not going to go out of my way to get one or to show it off though and I will not judge anybody for wearing one or not. I can see that it could be interpreted as both war propaganda or respect or that it just doesn't sound too important a campaign to some people so they don't care either way. They all seem like reasonable enough views to me.
      Offline

      14
      ReputationRep:
      If its only to remember the WW2 and Ww1 dead then fine.But very often it is expanded to include those who died in iraq and more recent conflicts.Now they had a choice to fight they were not forced.Its a very different thing.Plus I would prefer if it commerated all soldiers not just the british ones.Too often there is a narrative that the germans were evil people.No.Hitler and the higher ups were but the ordinary soldiers were just young men who should have lived long lives and deserve to be commemerated as well.Besides how long do we remember for? 100 years, 1000........ We dont remember the wars fought for the roman empire.At some point you just have to let it go and consign it to history.Maybe its time?
     
     
     
  1. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  2. Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Useful resources
  3. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  4. The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.