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    I have been told the course is easy . After researching the course, I quite liked it and it looked fun but I've been told that most of the students change their course after studying it for a year because there are no jobs available. I'd like to study it if I'll get a job in the healthcare.
    Is the Biomedical degree pointless?
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    Biomedical science is by no means easy and is a lot of work. If you're looking for work as a healthcare/biomed scientist then go for it!
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    Well I just started studying Biomed seven weeks ago. The first year is mainly about getting everyone to the same level. I've done AH Chemistry and Biology so for me some of this year is fully revision.
    After year one we have to go for one of three options which leads to different careers. Applied Biomed, for instance, has a lot of work placements and lets you go straight into healthcare work after the four undergraduate years. The other courses have benefits and disadvantages.
    It really does just depend on how interested you are, but so far it's looking to be very interesting.

    (I'm actually in an Applied Microbiology lecture as I'm posting this.)
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    (Original post by nina313)
    I have been told the course is easy . After researching the course, I quite liked it and it looked fun but I've been told that most of the students change their course after studying it for a year because there are no jobs available. I'd like to study it if I'll get a job in the healthcare.
    Is the Biomedical degree pointless?
    I wouldn't say a Biomedical degree is pointless.

    TraineeBMS will be able to provide some valuable insight on the job market!
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    (Original post by Bio 7)
    Well I just started studying Biomed seven weeks ago. The first year is mainly about getting everyone to the same level. I've done AH Chemistry and Biology so for me some of this year is fully revision.
    After year one we have to go for one of three options which leads to different careers. Applied Biomed, for instance, has a lot of work placements and lets you go straight into health care works after the four undergraduate years. The other courses have benefits and disadvantages.
    It really does just depend on how interested you are, but so far it's looking to be very interesting.

    (I'm actually in an Applied Microbiology lecture as I'm posting this.)
    Thank you for replying.
    What's the difference between the 3 and 4 years long Biomed degree?
    Can you please recommend any websites which will be useful to look at for the modules you are studying?
    what did you learn in the first 7 weeks?
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    (Original post by nina313)
    Thank you for replying.
    What's the difference between the 3 and 4 years long Biomed degree?
    Can you please recommend any websites which will be useful to look at for the modules you are studying?
    what did you learn in the first 7 weeks?
    Well after having a look at the Uni websites for the modules in the courses I would try to see if there are any extra details on some of the specifics of the topics covered.
    The modules I've been doing for Semester One are Biology and Chemistry which is mostly just a small step up from AH Bio and Chem, not sure what the other country equivalents are. Applied Microbiology and a new module to the course Macronutrients. I would assume other Uni's likely don't include the last one as it was just added in for us this year.

    We only get 4 years courses for Biomed I think, but it may be that 3 year courses elsewhere cover different work and can complete it quicker. After year one we have the choice of three paths; Applied Biomed, Bioscience and Biomed.
    The Applied route has a lot of work placements in later years so after you can go straight into healthcare with the NHS. Bioscience route allows you to either go into R&D or spend a year-year and a half as a trainee then go to the NHS. Biomed locks you out of NHS work altogether.
    I can post more if you have more questions. There is a powerpoint I've got which has all the info I gave and more.
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    If you want to be a NHS Biomedical Scientist then your best bet isn't a conventional BSc Biomedical Science course but BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science). It is very similar to the Biomedical Science course but it includes the vital HCPC Registration all within 3 years. Normally that would take at least 4 years and that's assuming you got a rare NHS year in industry as part of your degree. Without HCPC registration you are at most, in regards to the NHS, qualified to work as Band 2 Medical Laboratory Assistant.

    Contrary to what @Kayleighm18 said, I would advise against this course for becoming a Biomedical Scientist, BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science) is far more advantageous. Getting a laboratory to support you in your portfolio is hard work. Last year there were 13 Trainee Biomedical Scientist roles to apply for. At York Hospital there were 200 applicants for one there. The most nailed on route is Healthcare Science. As long as you pass the degree, you will be a registered BMS by the end of it.
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    I have applied for Biomedical Science and have just started to get my offers in. I definitely don't think the course is easy but depending on what your interests are, if you enjoy the science of the body and research, this is such a good course. I eventually want to get into medical research and the courses I have applied to have a year in Industry. Which is such a good thing to have because after your 4th year, you have a good chance of employment due to the years experience you have. And it if such a flexible subject. The optional courses you get to choose from make sure you are almost always doing something that genuinely interests you. I don't know what unis you've been looking at but the ones I've seen have a very low drop out rate.
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    (Original post by Bio 7)
    Well after having a look at the Uni websites for the modules in the courses I would try to see if there are any extra details on some of the specifics of the topics covered.
    The modules I've been doing for Semester One are Biology and Chemistry which is mostly just a small step up from AH Bio and Chem, not sure what the other country equivalents are. Applied Microbiology and a new module to the course Macronutrients. I would assume other Uni's likely don't include the last one as it was just added in for us this year.

    We only get 4 years courses for Biomed I think, but it may be that 3 year courses elsewhere cover different work and can complete it quicker. After year one we have the choice of three paths; Applied Biomed, Bioscience and Biomed.
    The Applied route has a lot of work placements in later years so after you can go straight into healthcare with the NHS. Bioscience route allows you to either go into R&D or spend a year-year and a half as a trainee then go to the NHS. Biomed locks you out of NHS work altogether.
    I can post more if you have more questions. There is a powerpoint I've got which has all the info I gave and more.
    Thanks a lot for answering my questions. Could you please send me the powerpoint?
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    (Original post by Bio 7)
    Well after having a look at the Uni websites for the modules in the courses I would try to see if there are any extra details on some of the specifics of the topics covered.
    The modules I've been doing for Semester One are Biology and Chemistry which is mostly just a small step up from AH Bio and Chem, not sure what the other country equivalents are. Applied Microbiology and a new module to the course Macronutrients. I would assume other Uni's likely don't include the last one as it was just added in for us this year.

    We only get 4 years courses for Biomed I think, but it may be that 3 year courses elsewhere cover different work and can complete it quicker. After year one we have the choice of three paths; Applied Biomed, Bioscience and Biomed.
    The Applied route has a lot of work placements in later years so after you can go straight into healthcare with the NHS. Bioscience route allows you to either go into R&D or spend a year-year and a half as a trainee then go to the NHS. Biomed locks you out of NHS work altogether.
    I can post more if you have more questions. There is a powerpoint I've got which has all the info I gave and more.
    Biomedical Science courses don't lock you out of the NHS and 'Applied Biomedical Science' is an outdated route that is quickly being stopped and replaced with BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science). I say this as an active registered Biomedical Scientist.
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    (Original post by TraineeBMS)
    If you want to be a NHS Biomedical Scientist then your best bet isn't a conventional BSc Biomedical Science course but BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science). It is very similar to the Biomedical Science course but it includes the vital HCPC Registration all within 3 years. Normally that would take at least 4 years and that's assuming you got a rare NHS year in industry as part of your degree. Without HCPC registration you are at most, in regards to the NHS, qualified to work as Band 2 Medical Laboratory Assistant.

    Contrary to what @Kayleighm18 said, I would advise against this course for becoming a Biomedical Scientist, BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science) is far more advantageous. Getting a laboratory to support you in your portfolio is hard work. Last year there were 13 Trainee Biomedical Scientist roles to apply for. At York Hospital there were 200 applicants for one there. The most nailed on route is Healthcare Science. As long as you pass the degree, you will be a registered BMS by the end of it.
    Thanks for replying.
    To study life sciences, don't you need to be a degree holder in Biomedical Sciences?
    I'd like to work with NHS in the Haematology or Immunology department. The Universities I'm applying to their modules are HCPC registered. Will I still be able to find a job? I'm more worried about not been employed after getting the degree.
    Also, what does 2:1 and 2:2 degree means?
    After studying life sciences can I become a doctor?
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    it is by no means 'easy', i promise

    - 2nd year biomed student
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    (Original post by nina313)
    Thanks for replying.
    To study life sciences, don't you need to be a degree holder in Biomedical Sciences?
    I'd like to work with NHS in the Haematology or Immunology department. The Universities I'm applying to their modules are HCPC registered. Will I still be able to find a job? I'm more worried about not been employed after getting the degree.
    Also, what does 2:1 and 2:2 degree means?
    After studying life sciences can I become a doctor?
    BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science), otherwise known as the Practitioner's Training Program, is an undergraduate degree which is IBMS-accredited. Modules do not get HCPC accredited, HCPC is a council that manages the statutary registration of several professional groups. During BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science) each student is given diagnostic laboratory placements and given a portfolio to complete which will lead to registration with the HCPC at the end of the 3-year degree.

    A 2:1/2:2 is the level of degree, 60%/50% respectively.

    Graduates from BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science) tend to walk in to jobs as Biomedical Scientist's in the NHS. Yes you could go on to study Medicine, but why bother taking up a place on a course that only takes a few students each year if you don't actually want to be a Biomedical Scientist?
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    (Original post by TraineeBMS)
    BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science), otherwise known as the Practitioner's Training Program, is an undergraduate degree which is IBMS-accredited. Modules do not get HCPC accredited, HCPC is a council that manages the statutary registration of several professional groups. During BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science) each student is given diagnostic laboratory placements and given a portfolio to complete which will lead to registration with the HCPC at the end of the 3-year degree.

    A 2:1/2:2 is the level of degree, 60%/50% respectively.

    Graduates from BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science) tend to walk into jobs as Biomedical Scientists in the NHS. Yes you could go on to study Medicine, but why bother taking up a place on a course that only takes a few students each year if you don't actually want to be a Biomedical Scientist?
    I want to be a Biomedicine scientist but want to keep my options open and study medicine degree so I could work in different areas of the healthcare field.
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    (Original post by TraineeBMS)
    Biomedical Science courses don't lock you out of the NHS and 'Applied Biomedical Science' is an outdated route that is quickly being stopped and replaced with BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science). I say this as an active registered Biomedical Scientist.
    Yes that did seem odd to me but I remembered wrong, no locking out.
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    Sorry for the delay, here is the powerpoint that I got at the start of the semester about our choices for next year onwards.
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: pptxP&PS Intro & Path Info.pptx (991.1 KB, 7 views)
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    Hey OP please don't get confused and think hcpc and bms accredited courses mean you will be registered by the end of it. You won't be, not unless you compete your portfolio (which is hard to do, as not many training places). BMStrainee is right, the healthcare science route is the best option to actually become a registered BMS.


    Source: I graduated from an accredited bms course, I'm not hcpc registered.

    And no biomed is not easy.
 
 
 
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