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B1305 - Bottle Deposit Scheme Bill 2017 Watch

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    B1305 - Bottle Deposit Scheme Bill 2017, TSR Government




    Bottle Deposit Scheme Bill 2017


    A BILL TO Create a nationwide Bottle Deposit Scheme to incentivise the return of empty beverage containers for recycling.

    BE IT ENACTED by the Queen’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—


    PART I.
    DEFINITIONS



    1) Beverage:
    a) Brandy, gin, rum, whisky, cordials, spirits, wine, cider, perry, mead, ale, port, beers, stouts, ale, carbonated soft drink, water, milk, or any other liquid intended for human consumption by drinking.

    2) Container:
    a) An object designed to contain and transport liquid for the purpose of consumption after purchase.

    3) Collection Depot:
    a) Any household waste centre or business that can facilitate the recycling of glass, aluminium, steel, liquid paperboard or plastic (PET, PVC and HDPE).
    b) The bottle deposit scheme may be operated by both public and private sector recycling centres.

    4) Reverse Vending Machine:
    a) A device that accepts used beverage containers, sorts and processes materials for recycling, and then returns a monetary deposit to the user (in the form of either a cash or electronic payment).




    PART II.
    DEPOSIT, REFUNDS AND LABELLING



    5) A refundable deposit of 10p will be added to the sale price of every beverage container.

    6) Containers will be labelled as follows: ‘Collect a 10p refund by recycling this bottle’.

    7) Consumers may receive their 10p refund when they present the container for recycling.




    PART III.
    OPERATION



    8) Consumers may recycle their containers and collect their cash deposits at the following locations:
    a) Using a Reverse Vending Machine.
    b) At a suitable Collection Depot.

    9) Reverse Vending Machines may be installed in public areas such as supermarkets and community buildings. Machines should be operated within guidelines specified by the manufacturer and in respect of existing Health and Safety legislation.

    10) Reverse Vending Machines can be operated privately once purchased. The owner assumes responsibility for:
    a) the maintenance of said machinery
    b) the provision of sufficient coinage to facilitate deposit returns
    c) the management of recycling all material that has been pre-sorted and crushed by the machine, once it requires emptying.

    11) The following materials are eligible for recycling:
    a) Glass
    b) Aluminium
    c) Steel
    d) Liquid paperboard
    e) Plastic (PET, PVC and HDPE)

    12) £30 million will be allocated to provide financial support for the purchase and installation of Reverse Vending Machines nationwide.





    PART IV.
    SHORT TITLE, COMMENCEMENT AND EXTENT



    13) This Bill may be cited as the Bottle Deposit Scheme Bill 2017.
    14) This Bill will come into effect on the 1st January 2018.
    15) This Act extends to England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

    Notes A nationwide Bottle Deposit Scheme will provide a financial incentive for consumers to recycle their bottles. People may also be motivated to collect discarded bottles in order to make money for themselves. The end result will be cleaner streets and undoubtedly an increase in national recycling rates. In the UK, only around half of all bottles and containers are currently recycled. This needs to change if we are to combat litter and promote the values of re-using raw materials rather than using them from scratch. Currently, 16 million of the 35.8 million plastic bottles consumed every day evade recycling schemes, according to Recycle Now. Several of our European neighbours and numerous states in Australia and the USA already operate a bottle deposit scheme, and there is clear evidence to support the benefits of introducing one in the UK. Companies such as Coca Cola have also expressed their support for a UK bottle deposit scheme, demonstrating the potential for the private sector to take the lead on funding and implementing this scheme.


    CostingsThis legislation encourages strong private sector participation, but also recognises the role of government to offer assistance where required so the deposit scheme can be successfully implemented. £30 million should therefore been allocated to provide grants for businesses who require financial support when purchasing Reverse Vending Machines. The unit costs of these machines ranges from £7000-£10,000, depending on the manufacturer and specification.
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    Aye. This works extremely well in Germany and goes some way towards this government's green agenda.
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    (Original post by DayneD89)
    Aye. This works extremely well in Germany and goes some way towards this government's green agenda.
    Hear Hear! Great to get this bill back out as amended from last term
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    No, I think we should have a scheme in place where the consumer returns bottles and containers to the retailer with a valid receipt in return for the payment. This stops people going through rubbish to find bottles etc.

    Also why doesn't this apply to coffee cups?, for example in Costa they reduce the price of a drink by 25p if you reuse a costa cup.
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    Yay, more regressive taxation.
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    (Original post by Hazzer1998)
    No, I think we should have a scheme in place where the consumer returns bottles and containers to the retailer with a valid receipt in return for the payment. This stops people going through rubbish to find bottles etc.
    One of the unintended benefits of the German system is that bottles are almost never left as litter, and if they are then people have a financial incentive to pick them up and return them. This proposal would remove that benefit.

    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Yay, more regressive taxation.
    It's not taxation, and presuming people have the sense to follow the system it will be cost-neutral to them.
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    Makes sense to me, aye.
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    (Original post by Hazzer1998)
    No, I think we should have a scheme in place where the consumer returns bottles and containers to the retailer with a valid receipt in return for the payment. This stops people going through rubbish to find bottles etc.

    Also why doesn't this apply to coffee cups?, for example in Costa they reduce the price of a drink by 25p if you reuse a costa cup.
    Two main issues I can see with that in addition to what Fez said. One is that it's much more of a pain for the consumer to keep receipts as well as the bottles and this would likely make the scheme less effective. Two is that is that it would mean you'd need to take a receipt which is again bad for the environment by wasting paper and somewhat defeats the purpose.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    Two main issues I can see with that in addition to what Fez said. One is that it's much more of a pain for the consumer to keep receipts as well as the bottles and this would likely make the scheme less effective. Two is that is that it would mean you'd need to take a receipt which is again bad for the environment by wasting paper and somewhat defeats the purpose.
    There is a thing called "recycling", paper can be recycled and remade into lots of useful items. For example you can buy notebooks,etc made from recycled paper.

    On almost everything you buy a receipt is printed, it will not add to numbers of receipts already printed.
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    (Original post by Hazzer1998)
    There is a thing called "recycling", paper can be recycled and remade into lots of useful items. For example you can buy notebooks etc made from recycled paper.

    On almost everything you buy a receipt is printed, it will not add to numbers of receipts already printed.
    No need to be condescending is there? The whole point of this bill is to encourage recycling. Paper can obviously be recycled, but that doesn't mean it always will, whereas you'd hope larger stores in particular would have a procedure in place to make sure it is. It's only a marginal point, but paper receipts are something we should be moving away from IMO rather than encouraging.
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    (Original post by Saracen's Fez)
    One of the unintended benefits of the German system is that bottles are almost never left as litter, and if they are then people have a financial incentive to pick them up and return them. This proposal would remove that benefit
    If customers know that they will get money back if they show the receipt of a drink they brought and they bring the bottle back to the retailer then they are more likely to hold onto the bottle or container and will be less likely to litter.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    No need to be condescending is there? The whole point of this bill is to encourage recycling. Paper can obviously be recycled, but that doesn't mean it always will, whereas you'd hope larger stores in particular would have a procedure in place to make sure it is. It's only a marginal point, but paper receipts are something we should be moving away from IMO rather than encouraging.
    Seen my reply above. If the consumer knows they get money back by showing the receipt the store can then take the receipt and recycle it.
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    I am in agreement with this bill, a clear improvement on the status quo and providing a financial incentive to recycle, hopefully leading to cleaner streets.
    I would not support the valid receipt idea, ultimately it is more difficult for the consumer compared to this scheme(bottles are bought often and so receipts may pile up, making it more difficult to keep control of) , and would then perhaps be less successful..
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    :yep:
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    (Original post by Hazzer1998)
    No, I think we should have a scheme in place where the consumer returns bottles and containers to the retailer with a valid receipt in return for the payment. This stops people going through rubbish to find bottles etc.

    Also why doesn't this apply to coffee cups?, for example in Costa they reduce the price of a drink by 25p if you reuse a costa cup.
    Why, the purpose is to get the item into the recycling chain, if someone wants to put effort into mitigating the actions of others who do not fine, what is the problem?
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    (Original post by Hazzer1998)
    Seen my reply above. If the consumer knows they get money back by showing the receipt the store can then take the receipt and recycle it.
    How does that work where you take 50 bottles back, do you match the bottle to the receipt. The system in Sweden works fine, you are charged extra on your purchase and on the receipt from ICA similar it tells you how much you have paid re containers, you save them up at home and then turn up at ICA or similar, feed them through the machine at the entrance, get a little ticket, use it to reduce bill re your shop. Any need to bring paperwork re the purchase will slow the process, create queues and reduce use of the scheme.

    Swedish recycling is such (far more items than here) that we can stay at our house there for 2 weeks and end up with one small carrier bag of rubbish into the bin for the whole period, the only thing they do not (near us) do is food waste.
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    (Original post by Hazzer1998)
    If customers know that they will get money back if they show the receipt of a drink they brought and they bring the bottle back to the retailer then they are more likely to hold onto the bottle or container and will be less likely to litter.
    Not really an argument. They will get the money back with or without a receipt so the deterrent from littering is still there, but should littering still happen there is the opportunity for someone else to make a few pence from clearing it up.
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    aye
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    A total no-brainer - I'm very very happy to see this idea submitted to the House and I urge everyone to support it.
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    (Original post by Birchington)
    A total no-brainer - I'm very very happy to see this idea submitted to the House and I urge everyone to support it.
    Odd choice of wording given this 'idea' was submitted to the House already, over 7 months ago, by yourself:
    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=4636582

    A 7 month wait for what is in effect a second reading of that bill, is hardly 'soon' as promised either, or maybe it is going by the Government's activity standards this term. Clearly something was needed to make the Government look busy all of a sudden.

    However with that being said, I support the aim of this bill.
 
 
 
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