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    Hello

    So basically i've always wanted to go to Cambridge University to study Law. So, aside from good grades- how did you get accepted into the university of cambridge? Extracurriculars, achievements etc would be appreciated
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    I'll answer this as a lecturer rather than a former student.

    If a student wants to come to study with me, then I'm going to have to spend a considerable amount of time with them over the next three (or more) years. I'm passionate about the subjects and courses I lecture, as should you be, but more importantly, as much as A level students might view academics as dwelling in dusty old tome-filled rooms, we have personalities, hobbies and interests outside of the lecture hall.

    What does this mean for you? It means that if I interview you, then I want you to show a little bit of personality yourself. Everyone I interview will be good at their subject, and for something like law, you won't have really studied it before. So while being well-read is impressive, actually connecting on a personal level with a smile, a positive greeting, perhaps a bit of humour here and there, is great. We're not robots and we don't want to teach robots either.

    I don't honestly care if you do DoE or volunteer at an animal sanctuary or whatever else; just having some sort of demonstrable field you have passion for is what I'm looking for on the EC/achievements front. Because if you're going to be getting drilled by me for three years with work where you're going to need to put in a lot of hours, then it's nice for me to be able to see you already have the capacity to run with and carry a hobby or interest, whatever it may be. We know that A levels are a joke to you and require very little effort - they are that way to almost all applicants. That's why actually showing you can persist and have resilience with something is important.

    Whether it's outside of your academic field or not really doesn't matter. If I'm interviewing for mathematics then I'd be equally as impressed by someone who'd spent 200 hours studying Oxford's published first year maths lecture notes as I would be by someone who'd spent 200 hours studying seasonal migratory habits of birds. It's the dedication and similar traits that I'm looking for. If you're good enough, I can teach you the course material. But teaching you persistence and resilience is not as easy. Display to me that you've already got that, or at least got signs of that, and I'm going to find it a lot easier to view you as a success waiting to happen.
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    (Original post by Simba)
    I'll answer this as a lecturer rather than a former student.

    If a student wants to come to study with me, then I'm going to have to spend a considerable amount of time with them over the next three (or more) years. I'm passionate about the subjects and courses I lecture, as should you be, but more importantly, as much as A level students might view academics as dwelling in dusty old tome-filled rooms, we have personalities, hobbies and interests outside of the lecture hall.

    What does this mean for you? It means that if I interview you, then I want you to show a little bit of personality yourself. Everyone I interview will be good at their subject, and for something like law, you won't have really studied it before. So while being well-read is impressive, actually connecting on a personal level with a smile, a positive greeting, perhaps a bit of humour here and there, is great. We're not robots and we don't want to teach robots either.

    I don't honestly care if you do DoE or volunteer at an animal sanctuary or whatever else; just having some sort of demonstrable field you have passion for is what I'm looking for on the EC/achievements front. Because if you're going to be getting drilled by me for three years with work where you're going to need to put in a lot of hours, then it's nice for me to be able to see you already have the capacity to run with and carry a hobby or interest, whatever it may be. We know that A levels are a joke to you and require very little effort - they are that way to almost all applicants. That's why actually showing you can persist and have resilience with something is important.

    Whether it's outside of your academic field or not really doesn't matter. If I'm interviewing for mathematics then I'd be equally as impressed by someone who'd spent 200 hours studying Oxford's published first year maths lecture notes as I would be by someone who'd spent 200 hours studying seasonal migratory habits of birds. It's the dedication and similar traits that I'm looking for. If you're good enough, I can teach you the course material. But teaching you persistence and resilience is not as easy. Display to me that you've already got that, or at least got signs of that, and I'm going to find it a lot easier to view you as a success waiting to happen.
    Assuming you’re really what you say you are, are you a lecturer at Cambridge or somewhere else? Are you a fellow at a college or just a lecturer? If it’s a former, does your college know you’re active in a forum like this and advising prospective applicants in this manner?
    Is this based on your actual experience as an interviewer for undergraduate admission at Cambridge or is it your personal onpnion of what you imagine they’re looking for or?
    Even if you’re a real and have experience as a Cambridge interviewer (Maths, I presume by checking your other posts?), It’s quite possible not all interviewers conduct their interview with the same set of agenda/standard on what look for in a candidate.

    Sorry if I’m sounding too sceptic but I’m asking this because in a forum like this, it’s virtually impossible to know a true identity of a poster and it’s very easy for misinformation to spread.

    Though I’d agree with most of things (but not all) you’ve said about interview, I feel very uneasy someone without verified identity posting a quite definitive and ‘official’-sounding ‘advice’ on a topic like this, presenting yourself as ‘we’, as if they’re an actual interviewer, without any proof of it, especially when we have real Cambridge admission tutor/s in the forum with official representation.
    And all these 3 official representatives of Cambridge colleges here in TSR (one of them being Deputy Chairperson of Cambridge Admission Forum) have been coordinating their activities in this forum, so if you want to present yourself as another participant who also has a role in the admission and someone who speaks for Cambridge here, id strongly advise you to talk with them to clarify/verify your position and make sure they’re happy with how you operate here as an individual poster with anonymity.
    Otherwise, it’d get too confusing and can be misleading.
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    Sorry if I’m sounding too sceptic but I’m asking this because in a forum like this, it’s virtually impossible to know a true identity of a poster and it’s very easy for misinformation to spread.
    Yes, I agree that you should be sceptical. A lot of the previous post either goes against things Cambridge tutors say at outreach events, or at least does not align with the things said.

    In particular I've never heard an Oxbridge tutor state anything like:

    "It means that if I interview you, then I want you to show a little bit of personality yourself."

    and the phrase

    "Everyone I interview will be good at their subject,..."

    really doesn't ring true from someone who has interviewed. Yes, the applicants are (almost) all going to be good at the subject, but the point is to separate out the strong and very strong from the "mere" good and to do so on academic reasons, not on personality.

    And

    "If I'm interviewing for mathematics then I'd be equally as impressed by someone who'd spent 200 hours studying Oxford's published first year maths lecture notes as I would be by someone who'd spent 200 hours studying seasonal migratory habits of birds."

    runs entirely against what Stephen Siklos would say at all outreach events, which was that maths applicants need to be doing maths and extending themselves mathematically in the process. Indeed Cambridge (I think) coined the term "supercurricular" to describe the former as opposed to extracurricular for the latter.
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    Assuming you’re really what you say you are, are you a lecturer at Cambridge or somewhere else? Are you a fellow at a college or just a lecturer? If it’s a former, does your college know you’re active in a forum like this and advising prospective applicants in this manner?
    Is this based on your actual experience as an interviewer for undergraduate admission at Cambridge or is it your personal onpnion of what you imagine they’re looking for or?
    Even if you’re a real and have experience as a Cambridge interviewer (Maths, I presume by checking your other posts?), It’s quite possible not all interviewers conduct their interview with the same set of agenda/standard on what look for in a candidate.

    Sorry if I’m sounding too sceptic but I’m asking this because in a forum like this, it’s virtually impossible to know a true identity of a poster and it’s very easy for misinformation to spread.

    Though I’d agree with most of things (but not all) you’ve said about interview, I feel very uneasy someone without verified identity posting a quite definitive and ‘official’-sounding ‘advice’ on a topic like this, presenting yourself as ‘we’, as if they’re an actual interviewer, without any proof of it, especially when we have real Cambridge admission tutor/s in the forum with official representation.
    And all these 3 official representatives of Cambridge colleges here in TSR (one of them being Deputy Chairperson of Cambridge Admission Forum) have been coordinating their activities in this forum, so if you want to present yourself as another participant who also has a role in the admission and someone who speaks for Cambridge here, id strongly advise you to talk with them to clarify/verify your position and make sure they’re happy with how you operate here as an individual poster with anonymity.
    Otherwise, it’d get too confusing and can be misleading.
    Thank you for tagging me here. I agree, there is scope for confusion if individuals position themselves as speaking "for" Cambridge, or Cambridge Admissions, under cover of an alias. I would encourage any colleague active here to contact myself, Murray Edwards Admissions or Peterhouse Admissions so that we can coordinate our responses to students' queries as effectively as possible.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Thank you for tagging me here. I agree, there is scope for confusion if individuals position themselves as speaking "for" Cambridge, or Cambridge Admissions, under cover of an alias. I would encourage any colleague active here to contact myself, Murray Edwards Admissions or Peterhouse Admissions so that we can coordinate our responses to students' queries as effectively as possible.
    Thank you very much for responding and really sorry for summoning you at weekend.
 
 
 
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