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    Hi,
    I’ve been stuck on this question for a bit now.

    A mass of 0.35kg ice at -15∘C is lowered into an insulated beaker containing water at 59∘C
    . What is the minimum mass of water at this temperature needed in the beaker to achieve a final temperature of 0.0∘C?

    From previous parts of the question I worked out that it required 10657.5J to heat the ice to 0 degrees, it then required an additional 117250J to melt the ice.

    I think I need to use Q=mc delta T with the smallest value of Q that I can but I’m not sure what value of Q I need as I tried 10657.5 and got a mass of 0.043kg but it said that although that results in 0degrees it isn’t the smallest mass.

    Any help would be much appreciated
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    (Original post by Snoozinghamster)
    Hi,
    I’ve been stuck on this question for a bit now.

    A mass of 0.35kg ice at -15∘C is lowered into an insulated beaker containing water at 59∘C
    . What is the minimum mass of water at this temperature needed in the beaker to achieve a final temperature of 0.0∘C?

    From previous parts of the question I worked out that it required 10657.5J to heat the ice to 0 degrees, it then required an additional 117250J to melt the ice.

    I think I need to use Q=mc delta T with the smallest value of Q that I can but I’m not sure what value of Q I need as I tried 10657.5 and got a mass of 0.043kg but it said that although that results in 0degrees it isn’t the smallest mass.

    Any help would be much appreciated
    There is no description of the final state of matter in the beaker... I guess you don't need to consider the energy used to melt the ice - a beaker containing ice at 0.0 degrees is sufficient to answer the question.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    There is no description of the final state of matter in the beaker... I guess you don't need to consider the energy used to melt the ice - a beaker containing ice at 0.0 degrees is sufficient to answer the question.
    That’s what I thought, the values I used came from just the energy needed to heat the ice to 0 degrees so I have 0 degree ice in 0 degrees water.
    The hint at the end has said think about the energy transferred as ice goes to water and vice Versa. But I can’t think of any way of using that info.

    Thanks again
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