English Coursework- which topic? Watch

wantingp
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I'm doing coursework on a streetcar named desire and notes on a scandal. which question should I do? These aren't finished I just wanted to write a part of each and judge which I can do the best in:

The kaleidoscopic connection between illusion and reality.
Williams’ and Heller’s novels explore characters whose desire for love and vulnerability for love-based illusions are intrinsically similar. However, their flawed attempts at romantic escapades allow the flickering shards of “the broken world” to create a kaleidoscope of reality and illusion. The events and the images in ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ create scenes of strong and sudden contrast which are personified in the play’s characters. The questionable mental state of the characters makes for frantic flashes in which reality is almost indistinguishable-- much like Heller’s world which urges the readers to question Barbara’s authenticity as the impression of sanity quickly warps into obsession- the “confrontation of… reflection” being the only element to truly shatter the illusion.
An illusion can be loosely defined as a false idea or belief. Williams’ play inadvertently redefines this term as illusion is manifested into a slippery slope- from Blanche’s belief of youth and desirability to being consumed with the idea of maintaining her archaic Southern Belle persona in a fundamentally different world. The small flickers of change within the play eventually form a multi-faceted catastrophic picture in which the characters are controlled by one- Stanley Kowalski.
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Compare the ways in which the writers explore how illusion manifests itself within ‘Notes on a Scandal’ and ‘Streetcar Named Desire’
Heller’s manifestation of illusion is a gradual revelation for the readers, as the author orchestrates the subplot of Barbara’s developing infatuation with Sheba, in a manner where the readers’ uneasiness towards Barbara escalates to reveal the ‘illusions of grandeur’ and platonic intimacy. Contrastingly, Williams’ play spins the web of Blanche’s illusion in a raw, personal relationship between audience and character. Blanche’s delusion of youth and luxury are patently false and the hidden shards of the ‘broken world’ can be sensed by the audience very early on in the play.
The construction of the characters in both play and novel are vastly similar as the characteristics scattered amongst the cast provide the building blocks for a “broken world”.
Blanche’s aura is alarmingly incongruous when paired with the chaotic world of New Orleans’ French quarter. This inability to adapt forms the first push into the inevitable rabbit-hole of insanity for Blanche. Her arrival in New Orleans signifies the toxic mesh of two worlds- the archaic southern belle in the cultural melting-pot creates scenarios incomprehensible to Blanche.
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soIiIoquy
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(Original post by wantingp)
i'm doing coursework on a streetcar named desire and notes on a scandal. Which question should i do? These aren't finished i just wanted to write a part of each and judge which i can do the best in:

The kaleidoscopic connection between illusion and reality.
Williams’ and heller’s novels explore characters whose desire for love and vulnerability for love-based illusions are intrinsically similar. However, their flawed attempts at romantic escapades allow the flickering shards of “the broken world” to create a kaleidoscope of reality and illusion. The events and the images in ‘a streetcar named desire’ create scenes of strong and sudden contrast which are personified in the play’s characters. The questionable mental state of the characters makes for frantic flashes in which reality is almost indistinguishable-- much like heller’s world which urges the readers to question barbara’s authenticity as the impression of sanity quickly warps into obsession- the “confrontation of… reflection” being the only element to truly shatter the illusion.
An illusion can be loosely defined as a false idea or belief. Williams’ play inadvertently redefines this term as illusion is manifested into a slippery slope- from blanche’s belief of youth and desirability to being consumed with the idea of maintaining her archaic southern belle persona in a fundamentally different world. The small flickers of change within the play eventually form a multi-faceted catastrophic picture in which the characters are controlled by one- stanley kowalski.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
compare the ways in which the writers explore how illusion manifests itself within ‘notes on a scandal’ and ‘streetcar named desire’
heller’s manifestation of illusion is a gradual revelation for the readers, as the author orchestrates the subplot of barbara’s developing infatuation with sheba, in a manner where the readers’ uneasiness towards barbara escalates to reveal the ‘illusions of grandeur’ and platonic intimacy. Contrastingly, williams’ play spins the web of blanche’s illusion in a raw, personal relationship between audience and character. Blanche’s delusion of youth and luxury are patently false and the hidden shards of the ‘broken world’ can be sensed by the audience very early on in the play.
The construction of the characters in both play and novel are vastly similar as the characteristics scattered amongst the cast provide the building blocks for a “broken world”.
Blanche’s aura is alarmingly incongruous when paired with the chaotic world of new orleans’ french quarter. This inability to adapt forms the first push into the inevitable rabbit-hole of insanity for blanche. Her arrival in new orleans signifies the toxic mesh of two worlds- the archaic southern belle in the cultural melting-pot creates scenarios incomprehensible to blanche.
streetcar named desire!
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wantingp
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(Original post by soIiIoquy)
streetcar named desire!
theyre both on both books, its a comparative essay but both beginnings have more streetcar in them as im starting with streetcar and following by comparing with notes on a scandal.......
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soIiIoquy
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(Original post by wantingp)
theyre both on both books, its a comparative essay but both beginnings have more streetcar in them as im starting with streetcar and following by comparing with notes on a scandal.......
oh. i just saw streetcar named desire and got excited.. sorry.
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